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12

On Debian based systems there is the DPKG (below apt) can have diversions setup using the command dpkg-divert dpkg-divert is the utility used to set up and update the list of diversions. File diversions are a way of forcing dpkg(1) not to install a file into its location, but to a diverted location. ... System administrators can also use it ...


9

On Linux, you can use sudo killall ffmpeg to kill every process called "ffmpeg" or ps -ef | grep ffmpeg to get the process ids and then sudo kill <PID> to kill each one individually. If they don't die, sudo kill -9 <PID> will terminate them. If you don't want to kill ffmpeg, you can pause a running process with sudo kill -s SIGSTOP <PID> ...


8

Another solution I found was to change how I built the ffmbc package. Generally it's possible to pass an alternate prefix for the purpose of changing the final paths of the installed files: ./configure --prefix=/usr/local For Debian packages, this goes in the ${package}/debian/rules file as follows: override_dh_auto_configure: ./configure ...


7

At the top of your crontab file put SHELL and PATH declaration like: SHELL=/bin/bash PATH=/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin See this SE post for more details. The default SHELL and PATH for cron are SHELL=/bin/sh, PATH=/usr/bin:/bin (From man 5 crontab man page).


6

Not quite what you're asking, but if it's important for the ffmpeg job to finish, it might be enough to renice it to give it a lower priority than the web server processes. Run something like ps auxw |grep ffmpeg to get the PID of the ffmpeg process, then issue sudo renice -n 19 PID to change the process priority, for process PID from the first command. ...


5

It probably does not pick up your path since it's running from cron. There are several ways to make it know the path the easiest I have found is just hard code the path to which. Do a: locate which Mine returns this: [user@server ~]$ locate which |grep bin /usr/bin/which Then change your script to do: if [ $(/usr/bin/which ffmpeg | grep -c "ffmpeg") ...


3

Try whereis ffmpeg on the command line.


3

If ffmpeg is in the path, use which ffmpeg to find its path. If it's not in the path, use locate ffmpeg. The fact that it's a server should not change the path where it is installed if you installed it with packages, so it should probably be in /usr/bin/ffmpeg.


3

I've used ffmpeg for a long time and for different encoding/decoding purposes. I find it very reliable. MPlayer, Mencoder and VLC are good players which are based on the ffmpeg library, so you could use them for easier syntax and extended functionality. And a side note: VLC is not only a great player, but also an extremly powerful streaming media server. ...


3

Red Hat doesn't distribute MP3-enabled packages due to patent and licensing issues. You can find the necessary packages for CentOS and Fedora from the RPM Fusion free and nonfree repositories.


3

You can allow users to upload directly to your S3 bucket, see Browser Uploads to S3 using HTML POST Forms for an example.


3

In the past I've used mplayer with dumpstream + a filesizecheck for mms. (let it run for a few seconds, kill it, check if the file is large enough) Maybe this will work for rtmp as well, but I don't know how reliable mplayer's support is. Btw, title has the abbreviation wrong


3

ffmpeg knows that the %d means a single numeric character and so increments through the list of files. So it is ffmpeg doing this rather than the shell - this is important to make sure the images are in sequence. Note that if your numeric suffixes are more than single digit - like image001.jpg up to image110.jpg then you need to let it know: ffmpeg -r 0.1 ...


3

On Fedora or RHEL I use ATRPMS to install ffmpeg. I'm not sure how well that'll work for Amazon Linux. Worst case is you'd pull down all the RPMs manually and then rebuild them locally which should be simpler than trying to build all the ffmpeg deps yourself. And you'd have RPMs you can put in your local repo or whatever. In regards to the yum package ...


2

It might be in the bin, etc... It kinda depends where it got installed. Use the find function to get it for sure.


2

Well, the direct answer is no, but the correct answer is I can. When you have missing dependencies during compile, you just need to hunt those down and compile them, then try again. If you're feeling really fancy, you can make your own package out of all those dependencies. There is no fundamental incompatibility about it, just a bit of hard experience.


2

on godaddy, yum is not working. Of course it's not working, because it's not your server to install packages on. You may be able to find a statically-linked binary of ffmpeg around, which you should be able to run in a shared hosting environment. However, if you really need the ability to add/remove packages like this, switch to a VPS solution instead ...


2

Various builds of ffmpeg have certain modules enabled/disabled, often for legal reasons. (Certain patented codecs and what not can generally not be distributed, except in source form, depending on the country.) If you want the full package, you will likely have to build it yourself, or browse Google for an hour, searching for a binary that has the modules ...


2

VLC does not support segmenting the output file. You can try to use directly ffmpeg as it supports output segmentation: ffmpeg -i rtsp://admin:admin@10.1.1.1:554/ch1-s1 -c copy -map 0 -f segment -segment_time 600 -segment_format mp4 "out%03d.mp4"


2

You told the server to bind to port 100. On UNIX systems such as Mac OS X and Linux, ports below 1024 can only be listened to by the root user. To resolve the issue, use one of the following two solutions: Select a different port for the server, which is 1024 or higher. Run the server as the root user, e.g. with sudo. (Not recommended)


2

video encoding is almost always cpu bottlenecked, so odds are amazon's high-cpu instances will be worth it for you. Similarly amazon's pricing has clear economies of scale so fewer more powerful instances are going to be more cost effective in general. Push comes to shove though, none of us know your app so you gotta test yourself and do the math.


2

I found this to be the best guide when installing ffmpeg. http://www.videochat-scripts.com/install-ffmpeg-mplayer-flvtool2-yamdi-x264-theora-mp3lame-vorbis-ogg-faac/ Make sure you follow each step. If the install of any dependency fails, retry. Good luck. EDIT The guide doesn't include qt-faststart. Follow this if you need it: cd ~/ffmpeg make ...


2

Hi I hope this helps you, it seems pretty popular for easy installs. http://www.ffmpeginstaller.com/ ffmpeginstaller is a free software completely written in bash shell script. The purpose of this script is to build a video streaming platform form in your Gnu/Linux server. So you can start video streaming websites and avoid the cost of ...


2

As Zoredache mentioned, it's not showing as available from anywhere but main; it needs to be there before this will work. That said, you'll want to look into using pinning to set the origin used for a given package. Edit /etc/apt/preferences, and add a block something like this: Package: ffmpeg Pin: origin packages.medibuntu.org Pin-Priority: 600


2

This may be sufficient, but I don't know for sure. With ffmpeg 0.6.1, I get $ ffmpeg -h 2>&1 | grep crop -croptop size set top crop band size (in pixels) -cropbottom size set bottom crop band size (in pixels) -cropleft size set left crop band size (in pixels) -cropright size set right crop band size (in pixels) With ffmpeg ...


2

a "Connection refused" simply means that you attempted to connect doing everything correctly, and for whatever reason, the remote host responded with a TCP Reject packet. As to why they might have rejected your connection, I can only guess. There may have been a device somewhere in the middle that might have also rejected the connection (a firewall ...


2

Only one service can listen on a given IP and port combination at any one time. You probably have two options: Bind ffmpeg on port 80 to a different IP and setup a separate hostname. Have Apache redirect the requests transparently using mod_proxy.


2

Consider using a reverse proxy like nginx. Move apache on 8080 port, let ffserver be on 8090 and setup nginx on 80. Then configure nginx to proxy requests for location /video, for example, to 127.0.0.1:8090 and everything else to 127.0.0.1:8080. This will help you. Now clients connect only on 80 port.



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