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19

I have a Customer with two buildings across the street from each other in a similiar situation. When I started working with them in 2003 we put in a fixed wireless (802.11b using Cisco Aironet gear at the time) system. It worked well enough, but we had outages when an AP failed, and a loss of performance when the neighbors all started putting up wireless ...


18

Gigabit Ethernet over fiber and 100Base-LX10 aren't compatible. Further, the gigabit switch will not "fall back" or negotiate speed over fiber. This behavior is perfectly normal for fiber-based Ethernet. While copper-based Ethernet typically does have speed and duplex negotiation capabilities, fiber-based Ethernet does not. It sounds like you need to get a ...


17

If you're using copper, your cable runs will be limited. (15m for twin-ax, 55m for STP/UTP). Also, bear in mind that you will need Cat6 if you go with the STP/UTP option. (Cat6a will allow you to run 10G/copper at distances of 100m). The other thing you should look into is the relative cost of hardware. Most 10G fiber line cards are modular, with the optics ...


17

Depending on the technology you are employing, there may be many ways to achieve what you are trying to do: if your fiber links are Ethernet links and you can control the configuration of switches at both ends of the link, you may use 802.3ad link aggregation (also known as Trunking or Fast Etherchannel) to transparently aggregate at Layer 2 if you are ...


16

While Ethernet runs should extend up to 330 feet, as you've found many pieces of cheap equipment don't meet that specification. The most reliable solution you'll find here is to run fiber from one building to the next. It provides inherent galvanic isolation, so there's no need for surge suppressors (which probable don't work the way you think they do in the ...


12

That's not a network - that's just the physical medium. More information is on Wikipedia. The type of connectors you have on top are LC, the connectors you have on the bottom are SC. LC: SC:


11

The short answer re: how much cable to run and where to run it is: It DependsTM. I like having as few wiring closets as possible, with either copper or fiber risers interconnecting the wiring closets (more runs than you think you'll ever need), and minimizing the number of overall Ethernet switches.. Unless you have some compelling need for more Ethernet ...


10

Yes, they're completely hot-swappable. Think of them the same way as cables (note the link lights). Same for SFP+ direct-attach cables. It wouldn't make sense for them not to be hot-swappable. Heck, most network switches don't even have power switches :)


9

Orange cable meets the OM2 standard. Aqua meets OM3 or OM4 standards (usually OM3). Yellow is singlemode cable. The OM standards are backward compatible (for the most part; OM1 was defined to be 62.5/125 size; OM2+ are 50/125; but not all manufacturers followed this, just be sure to get the size that matches your equipment or you'll experience some ...


9

Are these lines coming from the same provider? What is your goal? Is it resiliency or performance? If it's performance and a single provider, lobby for a higher-bandwidth link from the provider (on a GigE port). If these are diverse links, I think the path of least resistance is to use of a link balancer unit. This was covered recently in: Load balancing ...


9

Now we have a fiber bundle between the two geographically separated sites. It's our own 'owned' fiber so a middleman isn't a concern... Additionally, the fiber ring has included multiple redundancies including separate physical pathings. All well and good. Given this, is it still considered 'best practice' to use routing and different subnets between ...


8

Why stop at gigabit? This device allows you to connect a pci express 16x card using an external box and the laptop's expresscard/34 slot. Now you put a 10gig card with sfp+, like one of these, into that. While you're at it, grab a couple of passive fiber taps. Now you've got a box that allows you to snoop any link you may encounter short of a sonet link, ...


8

I'm a little surprised at the answer your tech gave you. I'll accept that he may have told you more than you relayed, but... If I use test gear on a fiber run, it will tell me more than just "enough light for 1g". If there are problems, a TDR will tell exactly where the problem is and likely what it is as well. People with good testing equipment and ...


8

Dark fiber is just fiber that is not active. It is usually dark because it is planned surplus for future growth, this is normal.


8

Pretty much don't bend them past 90 degrees under load, pinch them, step on them, or crush them. Fiber has a minimum bending radius and varies between fiber manufactures (check out their documentation on the specific fiber). Fiber has a lower tolerance to pulling tension so you should generally pull it by hand, steadily, and not jerky. For the final ...


8

There's no reason why you technically can't do this. I'd probably do something similar, under the circumstances, actually. From a purely linux point of view, it's really easy, just give the connection an IP address with a /30 bitmask, giving you 2 IP addresses, then it's a simple Point-to-Point link. If you wanted to grow the network, you could get a 10GE ...


8

Certainly Cisco MDS 95xx FC switches can have 1Gbps and 10Gbps Fibre-Channel-over-Ethernet line cards added to them to convert regular FC traffic onto Data Centre Ethernet which can then be fed into any FCoE/DCE-capable switch, which in turn could have regular 1Gbps and 10Gbps Ethernet ports. That doesn't answer your question however, I'm unaware of any one ...


8

Can anyone point me to any coax-extending fiber hardware? No, coax is broadband (in the radiological sense, not the marking hype sense). Fiber is baseband. You can not convert from one to the other without something processing every discrete signal separately. This takes immensely expensive and complicated equipment. Would this introduce substantial ...


7

Replacing the bundles would be expensive. If you've got it in your budget (or insurance will pay for it), do it. As long as there were no nicks in the PVC sheathing, you should be alright (http://www.cat-5-cable-company.com/faq-bury-burial-cat-5-cable.html). It's hard to tell if you had any nicks in the plastic, but I imagine that you're going to find ...


7

If I installed Cisco GLC-SX-MM 1000Base SFP's, would that cause an issue if the other end of that fiber was connected to a 100Base SFP? Or do I need to have matching speeds on both ends? Your speeds must match


7

FC and 10GE use different bit encoding mechanisms, which dictates the maximum theoretical throughput for either. FC uses 8b/10b encoding while 10GE uses 64b/66b. What this means is that within the 8 Gbps for FC, 10 bits are sent for each byte of actual data. On the 8.5 Gbps (full underlying line rate of 8G FC) this comes out to 8.5 * 0.8 = 6.8 Gigabits ...


7

Personally I wouldn't bother. You would need: Cameras that support PPP Hardware at the other end that supports PPP To power media converters and the cameras This is just making something that's already reasonably simple into something that's more complicated when it doesn't need to be. You've stated that there is already power running around the ...


7

I read your entire question, and your last sentence Am I wrong in the assumption that a hardware router would solve our problem? no one here can properly answer even with the data provided. OH, and for grins I'll say that you should first check and see what kind of duplex/speed settings the ISP setup on their fiber handoff...as you almost always want to ...


6

I've personally made this device Build Wifi Hi-gain Antenna and have two buildings 2km's apart able to run 44Mbit/s Wifi Connection without any problems (802.11g) The whole cost ended up being about $70 excluding time, but it worked and worked well for over 2 years till I needed more bandwidth and ran SC fibre between them.


6

The only real danger is at the terminations, whore corrosion can start. As for the cables themselves, they're fine in water, although I'd be careful using it in a corrosive solution. Keep an eye open and you should see plenty of examples of network cables, including fibre, used outdoors in the weather. I know of examples where cables sit permanently in water ...


6

Basically they're not remotely compatible and will fail either on day one or pretty soon afterwards if used simultaneously. There are lots of reasons why there are two standards but they're far too dull, there's nothing inherently better or worse technically for each one carrying any kind or speed of traffic but the key thing is not to use the same together. ...


6

This article by SciFi author Neal Stephenson is a not-bad introduction. Wikipedia's article on Submarine Cables has a good overview as well. Details of cables differ, but the Wikipedia picture is representative: a bunch of fibers in the middle, a lot of layers wrapped around to protect them and to provide power. The fibers are single-mode (I think - I ...


6

Presumably you're using MMF, not SMF. If you're running SMF, you'll probably be fine. Check whether you're using 62.5µm or 50µm fibre. It's probable that your transceivers will only support the 50µm fibre. As well, you'll want to use OM3 or OM4-class fibre as OM1 or OM2 likely won't work well.


6

SX and LX is not about single- and multimode cables. It's different wavelengths of the Laser being used. LX has a much longer wavelength than SX. SX wavelength is usually 850 nm, where as LX is usually around 1300 nm. There is still a difference between multi- and singlemode cabling, but since you seem to be having a legacy-cabling, I bet you're using ...


6

I'll take a contrarian view here. There is nearly no value in going from cat5e to cat6a in almost all office environments. 10gb copper is nasty, expensive, and flakey. It uses far more space than 5e, is heavier, and is harder to install. You have to fully test the entire cable plant including your patch cables if you want it to work. And by test I ...



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