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33

It's a SID, or Security Identifier. If it's showing the string rather than a "friendly name," it sounds like the new server doesn't recognize the account.


5

You probably just want to use XFS. It's quite capable of what you're asking for, and does the job. There's no reason to complicate this with lesser-used filesystems, which can come with other tradeoffs. Please see: How does the number of subdirectories impact drive read / write performance on Linux? and The impact of a high directory-to-file ratio on XFS ...


3

Try running the install from an elevated command prompt that maps the network storage prior to running the install. (Basically, when you elevate the process it doesn't have access to the network share, because it's its own session and doesn't have access to the same resources your regular account has.)


3

You mustn't deny the user listing permission in the Windows directory, because he wouldn't be able to open vital programs (e.g. Explorer.exe), and that would cause all sorts of problem.


3

Create a folder with write permissions for the user. Create a robocopy job which copys everything out of this folder every minute. Is the only clean way for your thing. Otherwise you can set the listup permission, read attributes and the permission to write files into a folder.


2

If it's an AD account, then by "network hiccup" I would mean that windows is having trouble looking up the account, which sometimes happens when there's a connectivity issue. It might also be that your account doesn't have the privileges to look up a domain account (being a local account, perhaps?). However, my Adobe Flash Player Updater on my ...


1

The answer is the use of bash extglob, and works here, as well as many other Linux functions that accept file designation in the /directory/* form. Changing the group of files greedily in a directory, while excluding a directory, is possible by first turning extglob on, and then including the directory name to exclude as such: shopt -s extglob chgrp ...


1

You can use GNU find's ability to not follow a directory path into another filesystem: find /some/path -mount -exec chgrp groupname {} +


1

If it is read-only, why to not use a ISO file? You can use genisoimage or mkisofs. If you want to compress the whole thing, you can also use squashfs, another read-only filesystem with very high compression ratio.


1

Seeing the number of small files, I would consider using SquashFS. Especially if you have powerful enough CPU (meaning no Pentium III, or 1GHz ARM). Depending on the type of data stored, SquashFS can greatly reduce its size and thus the I/O when reading it. Only downside is CPU usage on read. On the other hand, any modern CPU can decompress at speeds far ...



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