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In addition to the "force create mode" and "force directory mode" options suggested by kolypto, you may also need force directory mode = 2770 force security mode = 660 See man smb.conf to adapt the mode bits to your needs.


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You're looking for Access Based Enumeration. Here's the explanation of the List Folder/Read Data permission: List Folder allows or denies viewing file names and subfolder names within the folder. List Folder affects the contents of that folder only and does not affect whether the folder you are setting the permission on will be listed. (Applies to folders ...


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I think you can use audit for specific file/directory or you can write custom rule based on your requirement auditctl -w <path to the file you need to monitor> -p war -k test Where -w is for specifying file path -p is for permission access (read,write,execute and attribute change) -k key name,you can give name you can ...


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I think 'Access-based Enumeration' is what you are looking for. Check: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc784710(v=ws.10).aspx


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i have the same issue vhost logs always owned by root with 640 permissions when created, a work round is to write a script to chmod or chown the permissions of the vhost log file name using a wild card on the end of the file name to capture the date format, on the end of the file then cron that script and set it once an hour or once a day, then your vhost ...


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A quick google reveals inotify api in the Linux kernel. Inotify (inode notify) is a Linux kernel subsystem that acts to extend filesystems to notice changes to the filesystem, and report those changes to applications I can't find any applications that allow you to watch a file directly with inotify. However there is the inotify-tools package which ...


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Sorry, there is nothing in the standard Linux system that does logging at such a level. You'll probably have to write a script, however, even that is a hit or miss proposition. Hmmmm....you might be able to set the immutable bit on the file to protect it and see who complains that it cannot be changed: chattr +i filename1 ... filenamen


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If the web server is running as the same user and group for every domain hosted, it is difficult (if not impossible) to make the setup secure. You want certain files to be accessible to the user as well as the web server, but not to other users. But as soon as the web server can access them, another user could read them by putting a symlink to the file ...


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I found off why, well, someone gave me the global hint. It's neither the fault of php or tmpfs. The culprit was systemd and his security system PrivateTmp. For those who get in the same issue that I did, the service php (and probably some others) have the PrivateTmp option to true in the systemd script (/usr/lib/systemd/system). In that case, a new /tmp ...


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I came up with this: find $SOURCE -mindepth 1 -printf 'chmod --reference=%p\t%p\n'|sed "s/\t$SOURCE/ $DEST/g"|sh It is not fully bullet proof, but does what I need.



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