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The SID's and GUID attributes will be retained You will see question marks regarding the NTFS permissions within the directory structure after you force remove the host from the domain. After you rejoin the system it will remap all of the SID's and GUID's and you will see the username associated to the GUID's and SID's again.


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Check out the permissions on the files directory. World needs to have the execute permission set to be able to traverse into it. You can set this with chmod o+x files from within the appropriate directory.


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I deleted files folder and created a new one in my web root, then copied all files to the new folder, now it's working fine.


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I know this issue was 10 months ago but I would just like to post that I had a very similar issue recently. I added a user to a group and the user still had no access to the folder. The solution was simply to log off from the user and then log in again. Based on your answer in the chat http://chat.stackexchange.com/transcript/message/22794884#22794884 ...


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The clean solution based on capabilities is described here: https://blog.night-shade.org.uk/2015/04/linux-capabilities-and-rsync-from-presentation-to-practice/ EDIT: details of the solution. Capabilities are composed of a combination of process capabilities, inherited between processes, and set initially by PAM, and file capabilities, set on executables. To ...


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If users don't have write permission on the parent share they don't have write permission on the subfolders. You need to give Users Change permission on the share. Useful blog post here discussing share and NTFS permissions: http://www.basvankaam.com/2013/06/15/share-vs-ntfs-permissions/ When you create a shared folder you apply share permissions and ...


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Had to brake this post into 2 Apache config # # This is the main Apache server configuration file. It contains the # configuration directives that give the server its instructions. # See <URL:http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/> for detailed information. # In particular, see # <URL:http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/mod/directives.html> # for a ...


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Found the answer here http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/79395/how-does-the-sticky-bit-work But it didn't solve my issue about why lighttpd can't access same files and apache can't But that might be another thread


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GNU 'ls' uses a '.' character to indicate a file with an SELinux security context, but no other alternate access method. Your system has SELinux installed and enabled, there really isn't anything you need to do. getenforce Disabled and cat /etc/selinux/ = SELINUX=permissive SELinux really isn't causing your problem you will need to look ...


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this is fairly trivial in word by simply controlling the regions. with a text file you need either an app or script that opens the file with FILE_APPEND_DATA access, and set permissions on the file with append only. for more details in word, ask on superuser.


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Change your user account password to a local password if you have now switched to using your apple ID login credentials. WINS and file share does not work with your iCloud login credentials.


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This could be do-able in linux, however if only for certain filesystems. I'm not sure this is achievable in any windows-based file systems. And even if it were I'm not sure it's achievable for the .docx file type since when you modify those files to just append text, it's more than just the last bytes of the file that are edited. In short, I don't think it's ...



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