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Configure the approriate SELinux booleans List the related booleans # semanage boolean -l | egrep 'ftp|http' | sort Turn on booleans that may be applicable temporarily i.e. # setsebool httpd_can_connect_ftp on To turn a boolean on permanently use -P flag i.e. # setsebool -P ftp_home_dir on


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How about "bind mount" ? # mount -o bind /var/www/vhosts/website1.com/ /home/ContractorA/website1.com/ # mount -o bind /var/www/vhosts/website2.com/ /home/ContractorA/website2.com/ # mount -o bind /var/www/vhosts/website3.com/ /home/ContractorA/website3.com/ # mount -o bind /var/www/vhosts/website1.com/ /home/ContractorB/website1.com/ # mount -o bind ...


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In POSIX-compliant file systems open files are not removed until no one has them open anymore. This same behavior is used in the standard library tmpfile which opens a temporary file and then deletes it. The open file handle is still usable by the process that has the file handle (or its children) but no other processes can open the file since there is no ...


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Unfortunately, this isn't really how EFS was intended to be used. I generally only use EFS for "deep storage" and archival purposes where only a couple of people would need to access the files. What you need is a more robust encryption and key management solution. I'm definitely not an expert when it comes to solutions that you probably should be using, ...


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The server did not have enough memory. Instead of caching NTFS metafile data in memory every file access required multiple disk reads. As usual, the issue is obvious once you see it. Let me share what clouded my perspective: The server showed 2 GB memory available both in Task Manager and RamMap. So either Windows decided that the available memory was not ...


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It takes that long for rsync just to analyze that many files, even though the transfer is efficient. It has to do in excess of 15M IOs, plus or minus caching. You could throw very fast storage at it, but that can be costly. The zfs suggestion is to use block level copies in which this becomes one giant file to transfer. The concepts also apply to lvm, ...


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Even if it's not Accessed Based Enumeration, the files could be invisible to users that don't have permission to access them. The word "moved" in your first sentence jumped out at me. I'm assuming that the application which creates the files is running either as domain administrator, or a service account. Whatever files are created by that process will ...


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What you described are Boot Environments (BE), which will be created automatically on system upgrades or manually with the beadm command. You can have multiple independent BEs, although only a single one can be active at the same time. You also can update/modify each BE separately. Normally you would do that to test specific software versions or a full ...


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As @c2h5oh says, the Unrecoverable is critical - it means the disk has already tried and failed to re-read the sector. In my experience, once a disk starts producing unrecoverable read errors (UREs), some data is lost forever, and your only hope is to immediately backup all data using GNU ddrescue, which can retry the failing sectors as well as skip ...


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After a bit of reading I realized that my question is incorrect. I wanted to know how to create partitions (not filesystems) on a disk with raid partitions. I used cfdisk to do that. But now I have another question: how come there is a 215 gb raid disk in a ~112 gb disk? Makes no sense to me.


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After creating your RAID you just format them using the RAID Device like this: mkfs.ext4 /dev/md0


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The answer is in the mount(8) manual page as well: Use findmnt -o TARGET,PROPAGATION to see the current propagation flags. An example: $ findmnt -o TARGET,PROPAGATION /opt TARGET PROPAGATION /opt shared $ sudo mount -o bind /opt /mnt $ sudo mount --make-slave /opt $ findmnt -o TARGET,PROPAGATION /opt TARGET PROPAGATION /opt private,slave $ sudo ...


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It's 2 views of the same data, modifications in one reflects in the other mount --bind /source /destrination http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/198590/what-is-a-bind-mount mount binds are just of way of ordering a filesystem view to your own preference


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Replacing the disk lines from sda to xvd was ultimately the solution: 'tap:aio:/dev/vg0/xen.placeholder.com-VolGroup00-disk1,xvda,rw', 'tap:aio:/dev/vg0/xen.placeholder.com-VolGroup00-disk2,xvdb,rw',



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