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1

Darn. It was a different userid afterall. My Windows admin gave me bad info because she had confused herself with different client accounts.


1

I've often seen this when client machines have Offline Files enabled for a given share. Same user, same share, different files on different machines.


0

/proc is a virtual filesystem, also referred to as a process information pseudo-file system. It doesn't contain 'real' files but runtime system information (e.g. system memory, devices mounted, hardware configuration, etc).


0

According to the spec, The VHDX file begins with a fixed-sized header section. After this, non-overlapping objects and free space are intermixed freely in no particular order; the only restriction being that all objects have 1 MB alignment within the file. The objects currently defined include the BAT region (also referred to as BAT), the ...


2

It effectively writes zeroes to all empty space on the volume; this allows for better compression of the physical file containing the virtual disk.


0

Did you try and repair using an alternate superblock? dumpe2fs /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s7 | grep superblock to get a list of backup superblocks then use one of the backup superblocks with fsck -b (backup superblock) /dev/rdsk/c0t0d0s7


2

dm-cache wasn't merged until 3.9 and bcache wasn't merged until 3.10. EnhanceIO is a fork of flashcache which some optimizations that also is available on 3.10. There have been a lot of advancements since 2.6.32 in the kernel and there aren't any backports for these features in the RHEL6 kernel which OpenVZ is based off of. OpenVZ will be releasing a beta ...


0

Here are some ideas. Ive used regshot before and it worked well https://www.raymond.cc/blog/tracking-registry-and-files-changes-when-installing-software-in-windows/


1

Is there anything preventing you from changing where your secondary disk mounts? I would unmount it, then mount it at a new point such as /newpointpoint then make sure /var still exists on your disk mounted at /. At that point you can just move everything from /newmountpoint/ to /var/.


-1

Look into something like one of the snapshot based package creators. Emisoft makes some. Cameyo is a app visualization platform, but will get the same info for free.


2

You could run Sysinternals Process Monitor which allows monitoring file system, registry and process/thread activity in real-time. You can also set filters that allows you to monitor just the installer, which helps to rule out changes made by other processes. Of course it doesn't track previous changes, so you have to run it during the installation. The ...


0

Try this. You can add any amount of folders, file types and file counts to the vairable $FoldersToCheck: # File to store log $LogFile = '.\FileCount.log' $FoldersToCheck = @( @{ Path = 'C:\path\to\folder' FileType = '*.cab' FileCount = 13 }, @{ Path = 'C:\path\to\folder\subfolder' FileType = '*.txt' ...


0

Modern Linux (ext4) adds a B-tree index for file lists. One of his effect is default files order depends on a hash of their names. To disable this feature use : tune2fs -O^dir_index


0

As already stated, you had first to resize the partition containing the logical volume, than you can proceed with LVM resize. Follow these steps: with fdisk -l -u /dev/sda take note of the current partition setting (especially the start sector) delete partition sda2 and recreate it. Use the very same start sector, or you will lose your data! Obviously, ...


0

In your script that creates the directories/files, add the 'chown developer' at the end to make the newly created files owned by the correct user. This seems much preferable to having root-owned files writeable by non-root users. However, I don't quite understand why ACLs aren't doing the right thing; if you have set the 'default' ACL, that should ensure ...


2

Get-Process won't get you anywhere. Assign the Count to a variable and test if the value of that variable is then 13: $cabFileCount = (Get-ChildItem -Filter "*.cab" "C:\path\to\folder").Count Write-Host $cabFileCount if($cabFileCount -eq 13){ # Success! Write-Host "$cabFileCount files found, perfect!" } else { # Failure! Write-Host ...


1

You can try iotop tool which shows you I/O usage by processes (in other words, which top processes are using your disk), so you can track which process is responsible for eating the space. Another way is to use inotify (part of inotify-tools) which can monitor directories for changes. Or simple way is to use du in the following way. Define the following ...


2

Look for recently modified files by using the command below. It will show the files modified during the last ten minutes inside FOLDER. Increase the -mmin -10 parameter to see how the FOLDER was modified through time. See man find and look for -mtime and -mmin for full details: sudo find FOLDER -xdev -type f -mmin -10 -ls Another situation is when deleted ...


0

If you have limited space available, you should not over-fragment it in multiple LVs. You can create a single large "data" LV and use it to store all user/application data. If you need to mount that single LV in multiple directories, you have two options: mount it under a single location (eg: /mnt/data) and use symlinks to point to it; mount it under a ...


0

I usually use ncdu to explore disk space usage, if your increasingly big folder doesn't block your system or the ncdu scan you should be able to find by looking which folders look anormaly big.


3

This is a classic case of trying to solve a people problem with a technical solution. Is it possible? Not as standard, no. Is there a workaround? Almost certainly, you could run a script or service to monitor the folder and rename things. Should you? In my opinion, no. Any attempt to come up with some hacky solution will only lead to excruciating pain ...


5

In the general case, you can't increase your inode limit without reformatting. ReiserFS doesn't use inodes. Don't use ReiserFS... it's as dead as Mrs. Reiser... though I suppose she'd probably prefer Mrs. Sharanova, considering.


2

You can use vmtouch for this... To see how much of SYSERR.TXT is in the file system cache, [root@GreenLeaf /ppro/data]# vmtouch -v SYSERR.TXT SYSERR.TXT [OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO] 1859/1859 Files: 1 Directories: 0 Resident Pages: 1859/1859 7M/7M 100% Elapsed: 0.000316 seconds 100% of it ...



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