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9

At the most basic level, a Windows user profile is entirety of the files and directories that contain the user-specific data (a very basic way to look at it is the profile is anything and everything contained within the c:\users\username directory) as well as the various registry entries that contain user specific settings contained within the HKCU hive. A ...


6

Q: is there another way to do this? A: Do yourself a favor and backup his old data and then delete his profile and redirected folders. Then allow Windows to create his user profile and redirected folders on first login. Then restore the data to the new redirected folders. Currently you're dealing with two different security entities (SID's) even though the ...


5

Data doesn't roam with Folder Redirection. Data is redirected with Folder Redirection. A roaming profile roams with the user, meaning that the data in the user profile "roams" to whatever computer the user logs on to. Folder Redirection data doesn't roam at all. It's location is static, but it's redirected from the standard location (the local hard drive) to ...


5

They are not mutually exclusive, you can use one, the other, or both. Although it can be advantageous, in certain configurations, to use both in tandem. A Roaming Profile refers to storing the user's profile in a networked location which will roam with their logon sessions of different computers. Folder Redirection is simply the redirection of specific ...


4

Check the affected profile directories for a hidden desktop.ini file.. This file can alter the display name and other directory display attributes. Deleting the desktop.ini file should restore the directory's display to "normal". On XP, the PersonalizedName in the [CopyOnDelete] section: [DeleteOnCopy] Owner=jscott Personalized=5 PersonalizedName=My ...


4

In Windows Vista and 7 you can use NTFS symbolic link. Wikipedia states that "the NTFS symbolic link implementation provides full support for cross-filesystem links." If you're not comfortable using the command line program mklink, you can use Link Shell Extension. After downloading and installing the software, follow the step-by-step guide in "Using Link ...


4

You can use them together. With roaming profiles, Windows clients download the whole profile to disk and use it from there, on logout they upload it to the server. Folder redirection redirects parts of user profile to network folders. The difference is: roaming profile will make log in and log out slower while folder redirection will make access to files ...


4

You could put up a machine in each site that answers for \\[crappy-old-server]\users as a standalone DFS root with users being a DFS link to the new \\[not-crappy-DFS-root]\[sitename]\users folder. You may be able to use the server you're deploying in each site using OptionalNames, assuming that you don't already have a share named users.


4

You should use Group Policy Preferences shortcut settings for this.


4

The folder redirection GPO settings include an option to remove the redirection or not when the group policy setting no longer applies. By default, this setting is set to leave the redirection in place after the GPO is removed. So that's probably what happened here. You removed the GPO, but it was set to keep the redirection in place anyway. You'll need ...


4

You can do this one of two ways. The way that I would recommend is as follows: Create a DFS namespace for your shares, something like \\domain\users should do. Add both servers to this DFS root. Check the box so that clients prefer (or are required) to use a server located in their AD site. Yes, it's smart enough to determine this using subnets defined ...


3

Don't enable the option that grants the user exclusive rights to the folder. We don't enable this on ANY of the redirects (that includes application data - makes it much easier to do stuff like generating signatures). Image for reference:


3

The folder was copied on 18.01.2013 (1/18/13) from one that was last modified 14.07.2009 (7/14/09).


3

Though I think you are asking for pain in your request, the solution is relatively simple. Simply update the policy to redirect to the local profile, and choose the option that migrates files. You could create a new policy that does the local redirection, set it to have a higher precedence, and apply it to some test users to be safe.


3

Redirected folders (should be) by default are setup for Offline Files unless explicitly configured otherwise. However, I would still verify it's setup correctly. But yes, offline files is what you're looking for.


3

In order for the Windows Search Service to be able to index a folder/share, the local SYSTEM account requires NTFS permissions on the server. After setting these permissions, group policy was able to add the users' home shares to the Documents library and I was able to do this manually myself without the message, "This network location can't be included ...


3

I believe that you'll witness this behavior on all non-local, non-spinning storage (eg network mounts and flash drives - though it may be true across all USB-mounted media as well). The Recycle Bin is really a local alias to a directory that holds files before being fully deleted. Windows does not setup a RECYCLER alias on non-local media (ie, not the ...


3

No it's not a good idea. Microsoft's recommendation is to not enable offline files for roaming profiles.


3

I just mocked this up with a Windows 7 SP1 client to make sure my "gut" feeling was correct, and it was. My settings were: My Documents Basic - Redirect everyone's folder to the same location Redirect to the following location \\SERVER\Users\%username%\Documents Grant the user exclusive rights to My Documents - Unticked Move the contents of My Documents to ...


3

It's stored in the client computer's registry. http://support.microsoft.com/kb/242557


3

I am inclined to think "These items are not found in the folder the start menu is redirected to" is the problem, and that it's actually being redirected somewhere else. Are your user accounts so locked down that you can't right click on start menu items and then look at the properties to see where they are located? Can you turn that setting off for a test? ...


2

It is expected to have such behavior over a WAN connection -which got confirmed by yourself in the answer you just posted (actually 45sec is not bad at all). have a look to this Technet Article for Folder Redirection over Slow Link GPO.


2

This is probably the wrong way to do this (as in, you probably want to use the file server migration tool or handle this through Group Policy, or get DFS replication working), but if you insist on using robocopy, you want the /zb switch. /ZB : Use restartable mode; if access denied use Backup mode.


2

You're seeing as-intended behavior. It sounds like you're expecting users to access these folders by navigating to paths under "C:\Users...". That's not what Microsoft intended. They intend the user to use the "Libraries" or other shell functionality to access the folders via their semantic names, not based on the physical path. There aren't supposed to be ...


2

To solve this problem, you have to ensure that you set the 'Redirect the folder back to the local userprofile location when policy is removed' setting when initially setting up the GPO So in this case, I have to add Folder Redirection that is not wanted, ensuring that I select the setting above, and then disable it once the policy has taken effect. A bit ...


2

It is possible with Group Policy. Those folders are Known Folders and you can disable them through Group Policy. Have a read at these links: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/bb776911(v=vs.85).aspx http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd744697(v=ws.10).aspx#WS_DisableKnownFolders ...


2

You could probably apply a WMI filter (spit) to your Folder Redirection GPO. The following link describes a WMI query that determines if a computer is a laptop or not: http://blogs.technet.com/heyscriptingguy/archive/2004/09/21/how-can-i-determine-if-a-computer-is-a-laptop-or-a-desktop-machine.aspx. This is a computer property but one good thing about WMI ...


2

Just remember to administer GPOs from the same level OS level as the clients you're targeting. If you don't have a Win2008R2 server, just install the admin tools onto your Win7 and you'll have access to everything you need. Be sure to check out GPO on technet, http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/windowsserver/grouppolicy/default.aspx, there are some guides ...


2

I don't allow Windows clients to create their redirected folders. Frankly, it seems like a potential DoS attack to me to have a world-writeable folder on a server computer where any user account can create sub-folders. (The whole notion of the client creating important folders like this seems brain-damaged to me-- as does the default behavior of breaking the ...


2

First, I would like to thank all who posted. I used all the tools you've mentioned to narrow down the problem. It seems like the GPO I posted was the correct configuration after all. All I did was change the order of my GPO's. I moved the Folder Redirection GPO to the top and the Default Domain Policy GPO to the bottom. I guess there is ...



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