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10

Before doing any of this make sure you are familiar with the freebsd-update process, possible ramifications, and requirements. Like any automated update there is a chance it will screw up. Create the file /usr/local/etc/periodic/weekly/912.freebsd-update with the following: #!/bin/sh - # # # If there is a global system configuration file, suck it in. # if ...


7

One thing that comes to my mind is that your system would have a separate /boot partition, which somehow was unmounted while you performed freebsd-update. This made the new kernel to be copied to your /boot directory inside the / partition, not the actual /boot. Now, during boot, your bootloader is configured to use the actual /boot and so the old kernel ...


6

No. If you refer to the FreeBSD handbook information on freebsd-update you will see, in a big gray box, the following note (emphasis added): Binary updates are available for all architectures and releases currently supported by the security team. Before updating to a new release, its release announcement should be reviewed as it contains important ...


4

You have probably upgraded the system from 9.1 to 9.2 but failed to reboot it. You might also have simply booted a previous kernel, but given the output you've shown, this seems much less likely. One other possibility comes to mind, that the system is actually inside a jail, running on a 9.1 system, so that while the jail is upgraded to 9.2, the host ...


3

Allow freebsd-update to run fetch without stdin attached to a terminal: sed 's/\[ ! -t 0 \]/false/' /usr/sbin/freebsd-update > /tmp/freebsd-update chmod +x /tmp/freebsd-update Allow portsnap to run fetch without stdin attached to a terminal: sed 's/\[ ! -t 0 \]/false/' /usr/sbin/portsnap > /tmp/portsnap chmod +x /tmp/portsnap Credits: veewee


3

I wasn't getting much response here, so I asked at forums.freebsd.org. The short answer is: No. There is no easy way to merge these changes using freebsd-update. freebsd-update uses merge(1) to perform the diffs and merging, and merge is not very friendly or flexible. There are other options, such as sysutils/etcupdate as suggested by kworr. However, I ...


2

8.2 to 8.3 should be a very seamless upgrade. There were quite few changes and the ports installed software should work without modification. The time to do the upgrade will depend on your system's speed. You can (and should) do a freebsd-update fetch to get the update files before starting in on the upgrade itself. The freebsd-update install command will ...


2

ls -Alt /var/db/pkg | grep '/$' | tail -n 20 should show 20 oldest apps installed from ports. Also, pkg_version -vIL= command could be usefult to compare versions of installed ports and ports in updated tree.


2

Blindly installing updates (even freebsd-update updates) can be a Bad Thing: One option in rc.conf changes, and suddenly your machine has no SSH daemon anymore. Similarly you probably don't want to blindly install all available port updates via portsnap / portupgrade -a -- you might take a major version number bump and break the universe, or you might ...


2

Use freebsd-update to upgrade the rest of the system and rebuild the kernel from sources as before. If the kernel has changed, freebsd-update will update the sources so you can then build your custom kernel as before. Bear in mind that some updates will not make any kernel changes and will not require a kernel rebuild.


2

FreeBSD uname is using sysctl values to fill-in its output, so there is no file to update except for the kernel. Here are the corresponding sysctl key to uname options (from usr.bin/uname/uname.c): -i : kern.ident -m : hw.machine -n : kern.hostname -p : hw.machine_arch -r : kern.osrelease -s or -o : kern.ostype -v : kern.version It seems your actual ...


1

Got answer on project's IRC: xmj: building the base from sources will force you to keep rebuilding it from source


1

You could setup your own freebsd-update server which would allow you to use a custom kernel. From the documentation: If you build your own release using the native make release procedure, the freebsd-update-server code will work from your release. As an example, you may build a release without ports or documentation and add a custom kernel. After ...


1

Have you tried to put this to your /boot/loader.conf? dummynet_load="YES" Should work with GENERIC kernel, too.


1

I would agree that in many cases, the older way will give less trouble; that is, if you're upgrading from a non-RELEASE "branch", major version upgrades, etc. But freebsd-update is "da schiz" for keeping a RELEASE-branch system current with security patches (or, in other words, a production machine/server). Anytime you update from something more than a few ...



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