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12

FreeNAS is a NAS solution, as such, some technical choices are hidden behind whatever firmware, system or GUI such appliance can use. If you get the partition schema used on a given disk inside a ZFS pool made with FreeNAS (small VM example): $ glabel status Name Status Components ...


12

I think you should reconsider your use of FreeNAS. You've had an uncharacteristically. large. number. of issues. with. your. FreeNAS. installation(s). over. the years. Many of these issues were planning and ZFS design problems. It may be time to refactor or rebuild your environment now that you have some knowledge of best or better-practices.


8

Briefly... Linux is a kernel, FreeBSD is an Operating System. So you really can't compare them like you want. The major distributions of Linux each have various levels of compatibility and differences... but I'll try to hit the things you named at least: There are a couple different package managers (dpkg and rpm probably being the most popular) for Linux ...


7

One thing that comes to my mind is that your system would have a separate /boot partition, which somehow was unmounted while you performed freebsd-update. This made the new kernel to be copied to your /boot directory inside the / partition, not the actual /boot. Now, during boot, your bootloader is configured to use the actual /boot and so the old kernel ...


6

There are some tricky considerations to make everything works out-of-the-box. FreeBSD only supports sssd version 1.9.6 at this moment. So there's no support for Enterprise Principal Names. If you have a domain with non matched UPNs it will fail to login, since the Kerberos authentication will fail during the process, even with FreeBSD supporting Enterprise ...


6

perhaps, you clean up apache's logs recently? if so, try to restart apache after that as well and you should regain your space back. run fsck as your filesystem may be corrupted. few ways to clean up your logs: setup logrorate (better way). echo > $FILE (dirty way).


6

Your problem is not FreeBSD, it's Apache. Apache 2.4 has substantially different configuration file directives than Apache 2.2. You cannot just throw the 2.2 configuration file in place and start your 2.4 server using it - you will need to put important bits (like the SSL Certificate and Key files - per the error message you're getting) in place, and ...


6

You are thinking about things from the wrong level, is all. If you move a file within the confines of a single ZFS dataset, it will react similarly to what you're expecting. If you move a file within the confines of a pool, but between datasets, it is a real move. Yes, technically the data just went from point A to point B and both points are on the same ...


6

No. If you refer to the FreeBSD handbook information on freebsd-update you will see, in a big gray box, the following note (emphasis added): Binary updates are available for all architectures and releases currently supported by the security team. Before updating to a new release, its release announcement should be reviewed as it contains important ...


5

Try portupgrade -f /var/db/pkg/p5*. This will rebuild all your installed p5* ports. portupgrade is not part of the base system. You can find this port in ports-mgmt/portupgrade.


5

Generally, you can consult the contents of the /usr/ports/UPDATING file on how to deal non-trivial upgrades. Usually, it provides solutions for users that are using portupgrade, portmaster or binary pkgng packages. Here are the instructions from the 20130612 entry in the UPDATING file: ... Please rebuild all Perl ports and all ports that depend on it: ...


5

You remove the files that were installed by hand, using the rm command. (If you don't know which files you need to remove sometimes it helps to make install again and look for the files that were updated - you've probably made yourself quite a mess though.) The next time you need to build a test environment you should think it through and plan for the ...


4

To get a disk serial requires that it is running and available: camcontrol identify <device> |grep ^serial (this might be (S)ATA specific) smartcl -i <device> |grep ^Serial reading the disk label once removed from the enclosure In your case, I think the 3rd solution is the only available. So, Assuming you just want first identify the disk: ...


4

The (sqlite) database used by pkg(ng) is corrupted. You should be able to restore the pkg db file using its daily backup: have a look at /var/backups/ # ls -lrt /var/backups/pkg* -rw-r--r-- 1 root wheel 16462211 May 3 03:01 pkgdb.bak.tbz -rw-r--r-- 1 root wheel 16462853 Apr 16 03:01 pkgdb.bak.tbz.2 -rw-r--r-- 1 root wheel 17824768 May 3 03:02 ...


4

its because its specifying a single ip, you need to write it with the subnet: pass in from 111.111.0.0/16 man pf.conf should list a few methods of defining ranges and blocks. A side note, take care to ensure there are no drop quick kind of rules above your pass, and no rules below that could accidently match and block your packets.


4

The last thing you should do now is increase MaxClients. It's rather hard to tell. The slowdown and MaxClients warnings suggest that you're getting too much demand for the server to cope with. Unless you run a lot of AJAX/COMET stuff on the server then you really should reduce the keepalive timeout (to, say, 2 initially). The "Battery needs replacement" is ...


4

You have probably upgraded the system from 9.1 to 9.2 but failed to reboot it. You might also have simply booted a previous kernel, but given the output you've shown, this seems much less likely. One other possibility comes to mind, that the system is actually inside a jail, running on a 9.1 system, so that while the jail is upgraded to 9.2, the host ...


4

I think you're looking for /etc/make.conf.


4

I've been playing around a bit with my own mail logs. Try grep 'to=<emailaddress' /var/log/maillog | cut -d ' ' -f 6 | grep -f - /var/log/maillog The -f - will read the list of strings to search for from stdin.


4

The problem is that the clients didn't realise that the nfs server went away, so they're still trying to access the filehandle that was originally created the previous time they mounted the file system. Normally, rebooting the client is a sure way of making it remount the file systems. But if you don't want to do that, start by killing all processes that ...


4

In FreeBSD the firewalls (IPF, IPFW, and PF) sit between the Device Driver and the IP Stack. Routing is part of the IP Stack.


4

This is tested on FreeBSD 10.0-RELEASE, but will likely work on FreeBSD 9.x. BIOS Configuration Open the BIOS settings and navigate to “Advanced → Serial Port Console Redirection” and ensure “SOL Console Redirection” is set to “Enabled” (you do not need to enable COM1 or COM2 or Out-of-Band management). Open the “SOL Console Redirection Settings” and ...


4

If you have the ports tree installed, just make install clean from /usr/ports/ports-mgmt/pkg. If you don't have ports: fetch "http://pkg.freebsd.org/freebsd:10:x86:64/latest/Latest/pkg.txz" setenv SIGNATURE_TYPE NONE pkg add pkg.txz If you're not using the default shell you might have to use set or export instead of setenv. And now to rant about ...


3

This is most likely because the file that used to be known as /var/log/messages is still open despite having been unlinked. Kill/restart the process that holds the file open (I would bet on syslogd) so that the space can be freed. Alternatively there could be more links to the file, but that seems rather unlikely unless you have deliberately set that up.


3

Whatever process writes to that file still has an open file handle for it. The space won't be reclaimed until that file handle is closed. Either restart the process (probably your syslog daemon) or restart the entire system if you don't care to track down the process.


3

CPU load information can be obtained in shell script from sysctl kern.cp_times. This is commulative counters, and to get load in % you need derivative, e. g. get kern.cp_times with 1 minute interval and divide counters by 60. But more easy to use existing monitoring systems like Nagios (there are many monitoring systems, but no perfect and I can't suggest ...


3

You'll probably want to check out /etc/devd.conf. devd is the primary way on FreeBSD of reacting to kernel/hardware events. There's an example in there that shows how to match a network UP/DOWN event and run a task, as below, and the man page has some good information. notify 0 { match "system" "IFNET"; match "type" "LINK_UP"; ...


3

It depends on your zpool arrangement, RAID type and whether you'll have any desire/ability to rewrite the data. If you're using ZFS in a group of RAIDZ vdevs, you can only expand by adding vdevs. New data will utilize the full set of drives, but existing data will not be redistributed. The same applies to zpool mirrors, but you can add those in smaller ...


3

Pfsense is it's own customised OS. You can't 'install' pfsense on an existing FreeBSD system as there is nothing released to allow you to do this. This pfsense Digest post also lists the currently available official AMIs The certified instance is It’s AMI ID id ami-6821b858 The public instances are US East (N. Virginia) - ami-11a58278 US ...


3

pfsense is a firewall OS and is based on FreeBSD And PF and would offer you a fully web based GUI. for more information check out http://www.pfsense.org



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