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35

I have been using freenas on a spare machine with 4x 1TB hard drives (2 raid 1's, so 2TB usable). It has been up 24/7 for 6 months. I find it brilliant! I tested many NAS's devices and only got a maximum of 10Mb/s on a gigabit port, and that was rare, typically it was around 3-4. My main reason for a device was to save energy, however 2x 2 drive nas's = ...


15

You can use rsync's --iconv option to convert between UTF-8 NFC & NFD, at least if you're on a Mac. There is a special utf-8-mac character set that stands for UTF-8 NFD. So to copy files from your Mac to your NAS, you'd need to run something like: rsync -a --iconv=utf-8-mac,utf-8 localdir/ mynas:remotedir/ This will convert all the local filenames ...


12

FreeNAS is a NAS solution, as such, some technical choices are hidden behind whatever firmware, system or GUI such appliance can use. If you get the partition schema used on a given disk inside a ZFS pool made with FreeNAS (small VM example): $ glabel status Name Status Components ...


12

I think you should reconsider your use of FreeNAS. You've had an uncharacteristically. large. number. of issues. with. your. FreeNAS. installation(s). over. the years. Many of these issues were planning and ZFS design problems. It may be time to refactor or rebuild your environment now that you have some knowledge of best or better-practices.


11

ZFS only protects your investment in the data on the disk. If the server is to be in production then you want the highest possible uptime and ECC helps this by allowing the server to tolerate a ONE BIT error in failing memory. This can give you time to schedule and replace failing memory without a panic.


11

ECC RAM is a good thing, but let's look at the context... For your intended use, a ProLiant Microserver is a nice small form-factor low-impact server. It lacks some of the attributes commonly associated with production-quality systems (only four drive bays, single power supply, weaker CPU). So, I think you'll run into problems associated with those ...


11

After much research on this I discovered what the problem was. Both pfSense and FreeNAS provide SNMP support through the FreeBSD begemot SNMP daemon (bsnmpd). In order to provide memory usage, CPU usage, and Load Average information, the begemot SNMP daemon needs to have an additional module, snmp_ucd.so loaded. I found the following forum thread explaining ...


11

I'd say the main advantage is ease of configuration - using something that's specifically designed for the role of a NAS server, as opposed to an all-around Linux distro. FreeNAS and OpenFiler also have features within easy reach that stock Ubuntu doesn't.


10

Map a drive as normal, only instead of \\server\share format you use server:/share format (don't forget the colon). Here's a nice post from the Ubuntu forums, but should be the same for NFS served by others.


9

There's no software RAID option for the setup you've described. VMware won't support it. If your hosts were Linux/Windows, you'd have some additional options. If your concern is system stability, you could have used RAID 1+0 and/or designated hot-spare drives in your setup. If performance isn't a concern (e.g. the use of RAID6), why worry about the ...


9

You really can't monitor the array status that well on your platform. One tacky option is cciss_vol_status, but it's far from the mainstream approach. This is kind of a bad combination of hardware and software. FreeBSD ProLiant support is a bit Meh... Okay, it's actually worse than that... So a few things to consider: ZFS is a software RAID and volume ...


9

Yes, it all works... Dedupe, compression, checksumming, caching are all present when using zvols in ZFS. But I really prefer NFS for virtualization purposes because of the transparency. But either will do the job. Can you elaborate a bit more on your intended use for ZFS? I ask because there are a lot of potential design/planning issues. Take a good read ...


8

Always run: "cd /filesystem; find . -type f -exec md5sum {} \; >& /filesystem-md5.log" and then "cd /filesystem-new; md5sum -c /filesystem-md5.log" before and after copying a large amount of data. You'll be surprised how much random data corruption you experience in the real world. When you find a corrupt file, "cmp -l badfile goodfile" to attempt to ...


8

I have a number of these servers and it is awkward to disconnect, although it does sound odd you are having this amount of trouble Tips, because of how the cable is routed and cable tied, also the length of the connector, you need to pull directly up while putting a kink in the actual cable. The metal clip seems to depress further if you place your finger ...


7

As you probably already know, DAVG refers to disk latency, and yeah, greater than 30msec is usually going to give you a noticeable decrease in performance and responsiveness. Latency can be caused by a lot of issues but first and foremost your disks must be able to handle the IO load you are throwing at them. IO load refers not only to the # of IO's per ...


7

As ewwhite said, pool shrinking isn't currently possible with ZFS. If you need to do it, you'll have to backup to another storage medium (another pool, tape, SAN, etc) create a new pool and restore. As for expanding there are a number of options of how to grow your ZFS 5x3TB raidz pool: Add a mirror VDEV (pairs of disks) pool spans the two VDEVs (12TB ...


7

A RAID-Z group within a ZFS pool will always lock the size to the smallest disk within the pool. So, currently, you have what is essentially a RAID-Z of 3x 40GB drives. One disk worth is dedicated to parity bits, so you've got 2x 40GB, which is 76.29 GiB. The way that you can work around this limitation is by not using RAID-Z at all. ZFS also lets you ...


7

I'm not sure what you mean. You can ask the disk to run a (SMART) self-test. This usually takes some time, and is somewhat stressful for the disk. I'd not recommend to run it more than once in a long while. On the other hand, you can check the SMART status from the disk. In other words, this means "read the SMART meters from the disk". This operation is ...


7

Rename can do this.. try something like find dir -depth -exec rename -n 's/[^[:ascii:]]/_/g' {} \; | cat -v you may need the cat -v to properly display any weird characters without your terminal getting screwed. if that prints acceptable substitutions change the -n to -v. That said, it sounds like the charset on your filesystem is wrong(mount -o utf8 ...


7

Freenas/Zfs reserves a small fragment of drive space. So besides having only ~1.82TB of actual space. ZFS reserves 1/64th of drive space for its own means, thus 'stealing' another ~28gb from you on every drive. Also freenas makes a 2gb swap file on every drive, Then losing the 1 drive to Raidz, 8.6TB seems pretty close. Source: ...


6

Yes, that is exactly what a hot spare is. The hot spare drive would occupy a drive bay and could be assigned to one or more data pools (global spare), and would automatically start a rebuilding process in the event of a failed disk. This is in contrast to a cold spare drive, that would sit outside of the server/enclosure in order to be swapped manually when ...


6

You could reword this as a non-shopping question, "How do I hook up a dozen SATA drives without using port multipliers or multiple PCI cards?" so I'll write an answer to that magical question: Buy a multi-ported SAS card and associated SAS 4x breakout cable (SFF-8087 MiniSAS to 4 SATA). 6gbps SAS2 is like SATA3 (6Gbps). Then use whatever motherboard you ...


6

After hours of googling and testing, I finally managed to get FreeNAS 8 integrated with Mac OS X Open Directory. Here's what's needed to make this happen: First, make sure that Open Directory is up and running using the Server Admin application: Note the LDAP Search Base and the Kerberos Realm. In FreeNAS's Web GUI, configure the LDAP service as ...


6

You are thinking about things from the wrong level, is all. If you move a file within the confines of a single ZFS dataset, it will react similarly to what you're expecting. If you move a file within the confines of a pool, but between datasets, it is a real move. Yes, technically the data just went from point A to point B and both points are on the same ...


6

Edit the username, groupname and home path in the passwd file with vipw Edit the groupname in the group file with vipw -g Rename your homefolder with mv


6

I think there are a few obvious solutions to finding out more: Hook up an additional device to the same UPS output. If both devices reboot simultaneously, that would be evidence of a power issue. Hook up some equipment that can monitor the actual voltage output by the UPS output and record changes over time.


6

It's been mentioned that RAID is not a backup. VERY TRUE. Keep that in mind. You're using terabyte sized disks, which increases the chances of an unrecoverable read error, which is a MAJOR PAIN IN THE @#$. Raid 5 is almost unusable as disks get larger; you could have one of the three disks fail completely, you replace it, and that's when you discover that ...


6

Performance would be my main concern; even if you're going to give the VM "direct" access to the physical disks, there's still VM-related overhead, and if you've got any decent load you'll have problems earlier in a VM than you would on a physical machine. But benchmark it, it might work OK for your workload. (For the record, I'd definitely lean towards ...


6

Get "cheap" 2.5" SATA drives, they work in SAS enclosures. If you're using a Pxxx series controller (the norm in HP servers) it might not work with just any drives, and is guaranteed to not run at optimum (HP uses custom firmware on their drives to get the most out of them). I really could not recommend one particular drive over another, though I've had good ...


6

The ZFS support in FreeBSD and OpenIndiana is based on the same OpenSolaris code, so they are certainly compatible within the normal limits (same goes with other OpenSolaris derivatives). There is a Linux module available that allows you to use the OpenSolaris code in Linux (they can't be distributed together, ever, because of Linux's infectious license). ...



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