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24

The answer really depends on your objective. gentoo is not worth the effort if you want to get a server up quickly and easily or think that you will get noticeably better performance. Other distributions (ubuntu, RHEL, CentOS) are easier to set up and operate. I do not believe the typical user will notice much of a performance benefit from controlling the ...


23

I'll offer a slightly different suggestion. I see many people, once they get comfortable with a particular distribution, fall into a cycle of perpetual changeover. They install a new shiny distro, but they can't get their webcam to work. So they switch. Now the webcam works, but something else doesn't work, and they switch again. (Then they get a job and are ...


15

I maintain more than a fair number of Gentoo machines. Not because we care for childish funroll-loops speed tuning. What we care about is the flexibility of installing precisely what we want, not every package feature and dependency that a contributor thinks we might one day want. We are perfectly comfortable with how Linux, compiling and libraries work. We ...


13

The reason to use Gentoo is so that you can install packages with the features you want. What I mean by this is: if you get a RedHat/CentOS/Debian/Ubuntu package for, say, Apache, you're going to get the features that they decided that you needed. If you want an additional feature, your only recourse is to download the source and compile. There's nothing ...


12

In addition to jldugger's answer, if you want to learn how things fit together, I'd recommend working your way through Linux from Scratch, which will teach you how to compile your own Linux install. It's sort of like doing a gentoo install by hand. It's not a distribution to use; it's something to do and then throw away once you've done the work. You can ...


11

The lm flag in your /proc/cpuinfo indicates that your server has a 64 bit CPU. The info from file prog indicates that the program is compiled for 32 bit architectures. Try installing the 32 libraries. I'm not familiar with how to do this in Gentoo, but maybe this Gentoo wiki article can help. I have had a simliar problem (bash reporting the file not being ...


9

You really kinda need the original mdadm.conf file. But, as you don't have it, you'll have to recreate it. First, before doing anything, read up on mdadm via its manual page. Why chance loosing your data to a situation or command that you didn't have a grasp of? That being said, this advice is at your own risk. You can easily loose all your data with the ...


8

Most common solutions are NIS+NFS or LDAP+NFS. NIS is easier to set up than LDAP, but LDAP supports multiple OSes and is more flexible in that sense. I would recommend using one of these two since both are well documented and established in the industry.


7

I won't comment on if you should use Gentoo or not - or if building from source 'is worth it' What I will say is that I use Gentoo and Ubuntu. I used to use Gentoo for all my GNU/Linux machines but decided that Ubuntu on my desktops was easier to manage. I am on the side of admins that think using Gentoo for a server is a great idea -- and use it for ...


7

I haven't experienced this issue, but I spent a while googling around and found that it may have been introduced in Apache 2.2.12 or 13. It is suggested that downgrading to 2.2.11 may fix it, as well as setting SSLProtocol -ALL +SSLv2 +SSLv3 in your Apache config. Neither one seemed definitive. Good luck! Hope you find a solution. ...


7

That was the correct thing to do. The Gentoo LiveCD may have been using the IDE driver instead of the SCSI driver for your (I'm assuming) SATA hard drives. Slower, but guaranteed to be reliable. You shouldn't need to do anything else; your system is stable.


6

I've been using close to the same steps you do, except for: eix-sync instead of emerge --sync because I like seeing the changes to the portage tree. This is especially nice for noticing packages I might want to install that are new to the tree. layman -S (occasionally) before the main emerge to sync any changes in overlays. eclean-dist -d after the ...


6

/etc/portage/package.mask will keep packages from being installed if they are optional. Otherwise they'll just block installation. You probably want to find use flags for what you're looking for. In the case of xorg-x11, it's a meta package that pulls in lots of stuff. You could install the dependencies by themselves if that's all you want.


6

If you are using GRUB as a boot manager, stop the boot at the boot menu. Highlight the kernel you boot into and hit the 'e' key to edit the line. Add the option "single" at the end of the line and it will boot into single user mode. If that fails, boot into a LiveCD and use that environment to mount your drive and fix the necessary files you need in order ...


6

For a server I would recommend CentOS. It is Red Hat without the support or trademarked logos, but line for line the binaries are identical. The amount of documentation available for a Red Hat server is far greater than for any other distro. At the very least it is worth a look. To a Linux beginner, Gentoo may be overwhelming. I'd recommend getting your ...


6

The easy_install code installs the packages for whichever version of Python is being used to run it. It sounds like your system default version of Python is 3.1, so something like this should make it work the way you want: /path/to/python2.5 /path/to/easy_install ReviewBoard Worst case you can edit the easy_install script and change the shebang to point ...


6

The right way to do this these days is, I believe, to add the DNS information to your /etc/conf.d/net file, so that the rc scripts manage your /etc/resolv.conf file correctly. Add: dns_servers="8.8.8.8 8.8.4.4" to that file and you should be good to go. If you need other resolver settings, look at the net.example file in /usr/share/doc/openrc-*/. Some of ...


6

Did you try to add --delete-excluded? Message cannot delete non-empty directory happens easily if delete a directory on the source side and then you want to run rsync --delete. Rsync will not let you delete the excluded files in the directory.


5

The best-practice is to use whatever kernel that comes with your distribution-channels. But if you're compiling your own, you certainly can use the old .config file for the basis of your new config. The tricky part is all the added modules between 2.6.27 and 2.6.32. The way I see it you have two options Option 1: Do all the research What's new in each ...


5

Actually you don't need to specify a full version. More appropriate way is emerge -av python:2.5


5

Well, FreeBSD won't really help you learn system internals for Linux. I'm partial to Gentoo, and Slackware is another option. For any option that will give you a really solid understanding of how the system is built, you're going to have to spend a fair bit of time configuring everything for the first time. That's how you will learn. Personally, I ...


5

UPDATE After reading the http-dev thread about this issue, archived at http://www.gossamer-threads.com/lists/apache/dev/375633 , it seems this issue is caused by a bug in the client-side OpenSSL library in regards to how SSL Tickets / IDs are handled, which explains why the error does not occur immediately, but takes a few seconds to minutes. This ...


5

It is perfectly safe... but, when you change global USE flags. You may as well run a emerge -auDN world. That'll re-emerge anything that was built with different flags than what you have now. When that is finished, it is also often a good idea to do a revdep-rebuild (from gentoolkit to ensure that libraries are in good shape. Finally, when all this is ...


4

Apparently in python-experimental, according to http://bugs.gentoo.org/250186


4

Yes, you shouldn't have any problems. I'd avoid making too many changes to the system filesystem. Things will go quicker if it's not competing with you for CPU, memory or IO, so avoid doing anything resource intensive if you want it to finish sooner. I'd also avoid rebooting. :)


4

I believe the difference is that DOS uses the IBM Standard Master Boot Record format defined by IBM back in the early 80's (and is the reason for the 2TB max-disk size we have), and Solaris uses the newer EFI standard. IIRC, Apple also uses EFI-style partitioning. Windows Dynamic Disks use EFI as well. DOS-format has by far the most support from commodity ...


4

you can set the variable PORTAGE_NICENESS in the file /etc/make.conf. it sums up a nice value to the emerge process, so that it has less priority on the system. for example: PORTAGE_NICENESS=10 the above line, in /etc/make.conf, will make portage increment 10 to the default nice value for that process (this will not set the nice value to 10, it will ...


4

When Linux boots up, it first boots a minimal Linux distribution from inside the initramfs. This is just a ram disk with a simple root file system. The initramfs does some initialization, loads all the necessary block device and filesystem drivers, and then mounts the real root file system, pivots into it, and boots from it. It looks like you have your raid ...


4

Most monitoring systems, whether they're software you install like Nagios or Zabbix or monitoring services such as Panopta or Pingdom, can be configured to detect 500 responses as errors and alert you to investigate. The benefit of using a full monitoring system is that you can get SMS or voice alerts in addition to just emails. You can also get notified ...


4

It's possible that the underlying network devices on the host do not have promiscuous mode enabled. In VMWare, for example, if the underlying virtual network adapter isn't +promisc then the guest bridge will fail miserably -- even though it thinks its able to enter promiscuous mode, it can't. I've never used HyperV, but the logic should be the same, if the ...



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