Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

2

The issue is not write access on /var/repo - I believe from the errors you've copied/pasted that this is set up correctly and probably always was. The issue is a lack of write permissions on /var/www. By following the instructions you've linked to what you've set up is a script that automatically takes the files you push to the git repository on the server ...


2

Hi i needed recently to patch gitlab for skipping confirmation for LDAP users. I do not consider this as a good patch but it works. vim /opt/gitlab/embedded/service/gitlab-rails/lib/api/users.rb: post do authenticated_as_admin! ... # <patch: if attrs[:extern_uid] # skip confirmation for LDAP ...


1

I ran into this same issue when running the salt-minion as "Local System" account on Windows. It has something to do with git itself when running as that user. Git is trying to do something which times out. The actual command succeeds, but is slowed down by whatever is timing out. It's a git issue.


1

Since you've said in the comments that users push to git via their username@server, you need to make sure all git users have read and write permissions to the repository. Add all users to a common group, called, say, git-users. groupadd git-users Now add each git user to the group: usermod -a -G git-users <username> Now, change the ownership ...


1

That tutorial is assuming you have superuser rights, so just use sudo su before you start running commands, or insert sudo before all the commands that require elevation.


1

you need root privilege so you have to add sudo : cd /var sudo mkdir repo && cd repo sudo mkdir site.git && cd site.git sudo git init --bare


1

A git repository is effectively a data structure for storing files as they change over time. The basic internals of the repo are commits and heads. The commits are basically the code changes being checked in. The heads are pointers to commits. Depending on how changes are being managed it could be a main or a branch (people use differing terminology ...


1

The answer to your question is no, there is no way within ssh to enforce regular changing pass phrases. As you're using a single account presumably all the public keys will be in a single authorised_keys file so you could invalidate keys by removing them from it. This though feels like too much effort and people could just use the same pass phrase on a ...


1

Building from source is quite straightforward. Digital Ocean has a nice guide on building Git from source on CentOS 7. Place the resulting binary in /usr/local/bin/ on your CentOS 7 system (which, by default, is included in your $PATH) and you're good to go. Of course you would prefer packages/using the repo, however given your situation I would not ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible