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You seem to be under the assumption that git-daemon is responsible. Have you confirmed that git-daemon is, in fact, running on the system? Check the process list as well as the open ports list: $ ps auxwww | grep git-daemon $ sudo netstat -ptuna | grep 9814 If git-daemon is not running and there's nothing listening on port 9814, it's possible that ...


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Port 9814 is where git-daemon runs (e.g clone, git clone git://git.example.com/repo). This is meant for an internal git repository. Read the documentation for more details. You have 2 other options for setting up a remote git server: SSH server: git clone ssh://git.example.com/git/repo HTTP server git clone https://git.example.com/git/repo SSH is a lot ...


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To aggregate the bits and pieces of good advice from the various other answers and comments about setting up a new repo: If you're setting up a brand new repo myrepo in /srv/git for the group mygroup, this is what you want: mkdir /srv/git/myrepo.git chgrp mygroup /srv/git/myrepo.git git init --bare --shared /srv/git/myrepo.git the first line creates the ...


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You need to read the Gentoo Perl upgrade news item. There is good additional background here: http://dilfridge.blogspot.com/2014/08/perl-in-gentoo-upgrading-pains-perl.html


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git bundle is helpful here. I've been using this for a while now: base_dir=/home/git for gitrepo in `ls -d *.git` do echo '**********[' ${gitrepo} ']***********' repo_name=${gitrepo%.git} echo cd ${base_dir}/${gitrepo} cd ${base_dir}/${gitrepo} backup_cmd="git bundle create /opt/git-backups/${repo_name}.bundle master" verify_command="git bundle verify ...



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