Hot answers tagged

46

GoDaddy [...] I assume their servers are geographically distributed Don't assume, verify with GoDaddy or verify it yourself. A quick traceroute to nsX.secureserver.com (a common DNS server name for GoDaddy) gives me a response from a datacenter here in Scandinavia where I live. So yes, it seems that GoDaddy has its nameservers spread out over at least ...


23

Go Daddy Managed servers cannot be made HIPAA complaint. HIPAA requires a DC inspection which will not be possible with our data centers.


19

Don't assume anything about GoDaddy. I've found them to be awful on many occasions. I personally have a separate DNS host to my domain registrar, because the DNS host provides a better service (more adjustable records, rather than just A and CNAME). From what I've seen, Route53 is supposed to be quite inexpensive, at least in line with Dynect's offering ...


19

I ran into the same problem with a site that I had hosted on a HostNine shared hosting package. They too give you ssh access, but they unfortunately don't have git installed and don't even give you access to run gcc, making it rather difficult to download and install git for your user. The only way I could think of to work around these restrictions was to ...


19

If you'd have posted the domain name (so we can do a WHOIS lookup on it) it would have been more helpful. That being said, there are typically 3-4 contacts for a domain. Registrant, Technical, Billing, and Administrator. As long as you're listed in at least ONE of these three you have a good chance of getting your domain. The process varies from ...


18

The bindings in IIS should use the internal IP. You will either have Port Forwarding Rules or Load Balancing Rules that take the external IP and translate it to the internal IP. Once translated the virtual machines will use the internal IP for everything, including bindings in IIS. When the request leaves the server the request will be translated back to the ...


15

To add a PTR record in the GoDaddy DNS Manager, you need to do the following: In the Zone Field Editor go down to the TXT(text) Zone Click Add SPF Record A window will open with 4 tabs (Inbound, Outbound, The well hidden 'PTR' and Outsourced) Go to the PTR tab Check Include PTR and add your public IP


14

If I'm not mistaken, the problem is that your registrar has published DS records for your domain - that is, DNSSEC signing keys: [me@risby player]$ dig ds ultreyatours.com [...] ;; ANSWER SECTION: ultreyatours.com. 85920 IN DS 49864 8 1 0152C1213569799FAFA42C7699A20132A293F908 ultreyatours.com. 85920 IN DS 20536 8 1 ...


13

In short, you can't make the @ record a CNAME without deleting all other resource records for @, and you can't do that since some (like the NS records) are required for proper DNS functionality. This is one reason why providers such as Heroku tell you not to use naked domain names. You will need a host to perform the HTTP redirection from example.com to ...


12

Your hosting provider who owns the IP sets the PTR record for it. There is nothing to do in the DNS zone editor for your domain. I have just done it. My hosting provider (digitalocean) automatically created PTR record when I named the host, it just needed to be the full name, ending with the domain. I added the IP in Godaddy's DNS editor. Now nslookup ...


11

To make things nice and clear, as some of the GoDaddy help articles are dead wrong: You just need to paste the two records from the server settings into your Route 53 control panel as a new record. The possible deception here is the the GD email panel will tell you you're wrong, but not what is right so you can make it right. Further, their help ...


10

You can eliminate this single point of failure by using two DNS providers. It might also be feasible to run your own DNS server on one of your servers. GoDaddy allows you to do zone transfers from their servers (IIRC premium DNS is required for this). Get a second DNS provider which allows you to run a slave server (or run it yourself). Adjust NS/Nserver ...


10

You can't. ELB provides one -- or more -- IP addresses, hiding behind the CNAME you are using with www record, and these addresses are not static, so you can't create an A record at the top ("apex") of your domain and point to the addresses... along with that, a CNAME at the apex of a domain is not a valid DNS configuration. So there isn't directly a way ...


9

You can create a CNAME record that points to the EC2 Public DNS In the GoDaddy DNS manager: Set record type to: CNAME Domain name to: whatever.domain.com Canonical name to: ec2-your-ec2.compute-1.amazonaws.com Then you can access ec2-your-ec2.compute-1.amazonaws.com using whatever.domain.com This will same you from having to pay the $.01 per hour for ...


8

You usually want to receive mail for address@mydomain.com, not for address@mail.mydomain.com, so an MX entry for mydomain.com will be sufficient, which usually should point to mail.mydomain.com to enable your mail server as an MX.


8

Which DNS providers allow me to do this? All competent ones. It doesn't even need to be a DNS-specific providing, most good hosts will help you with this too. There are two stages: A DNS entry is added for *.example.com The host's web server (e.g. Apache) is setup to respond to *.example.com by routing it to example.com's VirtualHost. Then, at your ...


8

Linode has DNS servers and a well-documented DNS Manager application that you can use to create your own DNS zone and records.


8

Verify that the correct intermediate certificates are being given out by the server at http://www.sslshopper.com/ssl-checker.html As martona suggested, you may need to use a different bundle.


8

Keep in mind FTP sends your password in CLEAR TEXT. So the potential for compromise is definitely there. Another thing to consider, is your FTP password UNIQUE to your hosting? Are you sure you're not using it ANYWHERE else? No other accounts, websites, etc? How secure is your EMAIL password? I've been involved in cases where the "weak link" was ...


7

Short answer - If you don't know reasons yourself, you probably don't need to switch - just stick with whatever you use. Route53 may be more reliable, may be faster, have some features that help integrate it with other AWS services, but you don't need any of it. If you care about the difference between 99.9 and 99.7, or if you care about 100ms vs 150ms, ...


7

Two things you can do: Verify the intermediate chain Clean up the intermediate chain Verify the intermediate chain As the error seems to indicate, there is something off about your intermediate certificate chain. You should check where you got your certificate from and that you got the correct intermediate bundle. You should verify the "hash" and ...


7

Something twinged as familiar while reading through your post. Then it hit me: I had seen this before, over a month ago, when trying to access a site for a game. See here - same behavior, the redirect action taken just on search engine referrers. The domain name in your .htaccess looked familiar because my home computer's antivirus had made loud noises ...


6

Easy! Don't use FTP. It transmits the credentials in plain-text and transmits all data in plain-text. It's one of the most insecure ways to transfer files. If your host doesn't support any other ways, find a new host.


6

Per AWS' examination, it was clear the MX record was pointing to mail.mydomain.com rather than simply the apex (mydomain.com). GoDaddy's e-mail set-up was likewise seeking mydomain.com...and not a non-existant subdomain. (I had mistakenly added the "mail." prefix in Route53.) When adding an MX record via the Route53 "Edit Record Set" panel (on the right ...


6

Depending on which type of certificate you have, go to https://certs.godaddy.com/Repository.go and download the appropriate intermediate certificate chain (one of the .crt files, most likely this one). Paste that into your PEM file along with your own certificate and key.


6

Log into the godaddy.com portal and edit the domain you want to change the DNS settings for (You are looking for the domain Manager). In the host summary (bottom left) is where you need to add the entries to ns1 and ns2 along with their IP addresses. It'll then take a little bit for everything to replicate so that you can point other domains to those ...


6

If you require the registrar (godaddy) to forward your domain, godaddy will redirect the web access from a domain to your IP. Client ===> Godaddy ===> You Godaddy acts as an intermediate between the client and you. If you want to bypass godaddy, the client has to initially resolve your domain as your IP. So the change must occur at the DNS level. ...


6

What you want is called virtual hosting. And it works much better than what you described! Just add multiple server blocks with different server_name and root directories. One server block per domain name. Note that only one of them can be marked as default_server but apart from that all blocks can look identical. The best way to do this is by creating one ...


5

You can achieve this easily using server blocks in Nginx to create multiple 'virtual hosts', each with a different HTTP configuration. This works by Nginx processing your request differently depending on which URL you used to reach the server. Put simply, to reach siteone.com you need to create a server block with a server_name value of siteone.com. Each ...


5

You'll want to replace the two GoDaddy nameservers with the four Route53 ones. To prevent downtime, ensure you have the same records in both GoDaddy and Route53 before making the nameserver changes.



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