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A big advantage is that most email spammer-blacklist organizations treat subdomains separately. So, even if your automated e-mail subdomain gets blocklisted (PC term for blacklist), your main domain will still be able to continue sending e-mails. This is actually pretty important, because even the most innocent newsletters/automated replies get flaged as ...


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The best thing to do is to forward e-mails from the old e-mails to one central e-mail address that you create, (provided that the customers doesn't use these anymore). That way they won't miss anything and will receive all of their mail. Then use the IMAP and POP3 services in a google account for the new e-mail that forwards all the incoming mail from the ...


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The TXT SPF record has to specify the IP of servers authorized to send mail on behalf of a given domain. The obvious solution is to use a different server to send email, not your web server. The easiest way to do this is to use an external SMTP provider - in the past I've used AuthSMTP, but I'm sure there are many available. In this scenario, if you have a ...


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I believe I found the most appropriate solution given all the caveats and constrains in this given scenario. Lindqvist's solutions were fine but if you whitelist your own server on the recipient side (in Google Apps, not through SPF) and at the same time you set DMARC policy with p=reject the emails your server is sending to you will be rejected no matter ...


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I would like to see the code you're using on your contact form that sends the email. A lot of people use the "From" address of the person filling out the email. When that happens, you open yourself up to a complete nightmare scenario when using Google. If the person sending the email has DMARC turned on. You're SPF might pass (but it won't be aligned). ...


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A couple of possible solutions come to mind: If you are only ever sending email to yourself, you may be able to whitelist your own server on the recipient side (not through SPF). Having a contact form on your web site does not actually necessitate that it's your own web server that also delivers the email; there are plenty of service providers for ...


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this is a mixture of SLO and SSO - the single login aspects are common and can be configured in a number of ways, they will rely on the LDAP protocol, as such your linux clients will be inside your private network and be configured to send authentication requests to a domain controller - this covers single login, there are many resources that cover ...



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