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23

Looks like Google will be a good fit when you want a DNS that conforms to RFC 1034, and when you aren't all tinfoil-hat about Google. OpenDNS hijacks your unresolved DNS queries and redirects you to advertising. This breaks the NXDOMAIN response. However, their claim to fame is that they provide user-definable filtering at the DNS level. Frankly, few ...


18

In case anyone else runs into this problem there is a way to force google-bot to re-download the robots.txt file. Go to Health -> Fetch as Google [1] and have it fetch /robots.txt That will re-download the file and google will also re-parse the file. [1] in the previous Google UI it was 'Diagnostics -> Fetch as GoogleBot'.


17

Google has servers all over the world and uses Anycast so that a server near you answers your request, they use the same method in their public DNS product. If you have servers on multiple geographic locations, you can set up something similiar with BIND, not using Anycast, but based on geolocation by using views for certain IP addresses.


16

I'm one of the developers on mod_spdy. At this stage the module is reasonably stable and fully SPDY/2 compliant (an earlier poster incorrectly claimed that it does not support multiplexing. That is incorrect). That said, it is not as stable as the core Apache modules like mod_ssl. I consider it a "beta" module suitable for use in environments where you can ...


13

Generally they look for subtle forensic clues; such as their homepage being changed to a banner which reads "p0Wned by TeH L33t Krew!! haahah1h1!! u noobs"


13

OK, I can duplicate the behavior (BIND 9.6), and believe I've sussed out the cause: If you have a wildcard A record and a more specific TXT record as below the A record breaks. *.test.bsd-box.net. IN A 127.0.0.1 www.test.bsd-box.net. IN TXT "This be a text record, mon!" but if you have a specific A record it works ...


12

Google's spiders are constantly crawling the web. They have multiple machines which crawl their massive index and add new pages to it all the time. Reasons it's fast: They have tons of machines doing the crawling at ridiculous speeds They have tons of bandwidth available They already have a giant index of pages to search so it saves time looking for new ...


11

Google has a corporate solution called Google Apps. Your company could consider using that. The paid version of Google Apps has service level guarantees, which could be better than what your internal IT could provide. As for advantages, Google has better spam filtering than most other email providers, because they have so much mail data they process ...


11

Nope, that is not possible. You can use whatever you want in the "From:" header, you could maybe ask google to remove it from his account (you need to confirm your From address in gmail the first time). But there is nothing that stops him from using his old from-address in his desktop-client. You could setup SPF records to tell remote mail servers that use ...


10

It appears to work by doing this: vbscript site:serverfault.com OR site:stackoverflow.com Of course, this could be a false positive and would require further testing Edit: It definitely works, as demonstrated in the Results Summary: Results 1 - 10 of about 9,080 from serverfault.com OR stackoverflow.com for vbscript. (0.06 seconds)


10

Take a look at Google platform.


10

Lots of these: Servers


10

A successful hack is one that goes undetected ;) A sysadmin can set up honey pots, dummy computers to fool hackers into thinking that they're a real system with real data. In the honey pot all activity is monitored and the behaviour of the hacker is studied to help learn more about what a hacker or virus is trying to do to help security experts figure out ...


9

I did the same thing recently for two of my clients. Commander Keen is correct you are looking for Google Applications. There is a free and paid plan. The paid plan has more uptime guarantees and vastly more space. You route mail from your server to Google by modifying your Zone Record/DNS. Its not that hard to do. And they provide some decent ...


9

If you're mostly concerned with it being indexed by Google, et al., then you could use a robots.txt file. That said, if you tell robots not to index it, you're also tipping your hand to its existence. ("Ignore the man behind the curtain.") Two people so far have commented that if you put the directory in robots.txt, it becomes obvious that there's ...


9

Nobody's mentioned logging yet. If you are using plain HTTP, then any proxy / firewall device in between your server and your end user can log your URL and administrators of those devices will be able to see the "supposedly private" URL being accessed. If you want to be sure your URL won't be leaked even to intermediate devices like proxies and firewalls, ...


9

How Google search actually works is, of course, a closely-guarded secret. However, in the past there has been some info coming out of them with general practices they employ. First off, Google has hundreds of datacenters - back in 2008-ish, they were already estimated to run on several hundred thousand servers; you can safely assume they have more than a ...


9

You cannot do this because you can only see cookies from the domain that your site is on. The browser will NOT send you any cookies from other domains.


8

It is unlikely that it will be found, but you can't trust it. If you don't want the world to see it, put some kind of authentication on it so your friend has to at least log in. Even then, once you share it with your friend you can't be sure he hasn't leaked the secret to someone else. If you must do this, take it down once you no longer need to share it.


8

Many routers are typically programmed to give lower priority to ICMP packets so they aren't "wasting" processing power over "real" traffic. Just because you see a hop with high loss doesn't mean it's slowing down "real" traffic; it may only be throwing away ICMP. That's not necessarily good because it might mean the router is too busy, but it's not ...


8

http://code.google.com/p/namebench/ It will compare several public DNS server(s) including Google to your current one.


8

Google is very clear that they do not penalize sites for being on the same IP address or server. Matt Cutts of Google answers the question very directly via Google Video. Another direct quote, from seroundtable.com: "Actually, Google handles virtually hosted domains and their links just the same as domains on unique IP addresses. If your ISP does ...


8

Go to google webmaster tools, put in throttling. Several other spiders respect the Crawl-delay directive in robots.txt, but Googlebot doesn't.


8

It looks like they purchased and/or leased some address space out of Level 3's 8.0.0.0/8 block. This is a standard thing - a company with a large IP block such as a /8 (e.g. Level3's 8.0.0.0-8.255.255.255) will allocate blocks out to other companies. Level 3's had the 8.0.0.0/8 netblock for a while - since 1992 according to WHOIS. Below is an output from ...


8

Why on earth would you install Google Desktop on a server? That's got bad idea written all over it. I don't mean that question rhetorically, either. I literally cannot think of a single legitimate reason to install it on a server and I'm curious about why you think your situation dictates its usage. If the Microsoft-blessed Windows Search 4.0 isn't doing ...


7

You're mixing the terms a bit. Google App Engine is for developing your own services. You want to sign up for Google Applications: http://www.google.com/apps/intl/en/business/index.html When doing that, you'll get good instructions on how to relay your email through google. Both in- and outgoing.


7

Have you looked at roundcube?


7

Setup a robots.txt file to block things from search engines.


7

Google has documented their methods at least partially in their paper Moving Beyond End-to-End Path Information to Optimize CDN Performance. It is largely based on latency to various ASes according to this paper.


7

I would like to know some suggestions for open source solutions, I dont want something really complex ("a complete enterprise groupware solution", just the name "enterprise" gives me itches), I want a simple web based e-mail account. If a web interface is not possible, at least a *nix solution very light which supports pop3/imap. I use: Postfix for ...



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