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28

This can be done by the means of WMI filtering. The group policy client would execute the WQL query from an attached WMI filter and only apply the GPO if the query would return a non-zero number of rows. So by creating a WMI filter checking if the current system time is within a given time interval and linking this WMI filter to the GPO you want to timebomb ...


13

Yes, there is an option in GPO. Do realize that users can still add or create shortcuts or items on their desktops. You can also prohibit this if needed. If you want to do it using the registry, you can do it in HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Advanced\HideIcons you can still deploy this using GPO. You can find this under ...


11

Provided you have a Windows 2012 Domain controller, yes! Where can we find group membership details? When you look into the member attribute of an AD group you’ll find a list of all members in distinguished name format. But that’s it. There is no smoking gun or finger prints that tell you how they got there. However, there is a little-known piece of ...


8

You're running into a design-limitation of Offline Files. It is a per-machine cache, enabled and disabled at a per-machine level. Offline Files limits visibility of items to users who are authorized to view them, but there is a single cache on the machine. You can't disable the caching functionality for just certain users on a machine. There just isn't a ...


7

My take is "Group policy needs to be run synchronously". Seriously. The default in Windows 2000 was to run all Group Policy (computer and user) synchronously. Microsoft had materials in their "Official Curriculum" back then that even describe asynchronous policy application as potentially unreliable. You can change this default behavior by using a ...


7

Add the specified machines to an Active Directory Security Group and add the Group to the GPO with a "Deny" for "Apply Policy" (Don't fall for doing a full deny as it will stop the GPO name from enumerating, making troubleshooting difficult). Then, add the machines to that Group as required.


7

As with many Group Policies, the setting are stored in a Policies key in the registry. The Windows Firewall machine policy key is located at: HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\WindowsFirewall If you delete this key the "old" GP firewall settings are gone. If you restart the machine, it should able to pull down a fresh copy of your firewall GPO.


6

Using different LUNs for different shares really seems like overkill. I can definitely tell you that I've never seen that done. They're all going to have a random-access pattern, so the workloads are going to be very nearly the same. Putting them on separate LUNs may make reconfiguring the storage w/o taking downtime more difficult down the road. I don't ...


6

donL, So I was curious enough about this one to research it out. I don't have a 2003 server environment to test on, so it was up to "Google Fu" to check into this. Turns out it is a "bug" in the GUI. The policy you applied did work correctly, it just doesn't show up correctly in IE's GUI on the client. Stupid, yes...but true. Here's an example accepted ...


6

Your conception is incorrect. ADM/ADMX files are nothing like exports from the registry. Administrative Templates (both the old-style ADM and newer-style ADMX files) exist to drive the user interface in the Group Policy editor. They define the settings that can be managed, not the settings themselves. These settings amount to registry values which are ...


6

.admx files are written in XML and contain settings that the Group Policy Management Console can read. Group Policy then translates those settings to registry keys (which may not exist prior to the policy being applied). Windows update settings live in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate. When I worked in a setting without ...


6

I've dealt with similar problems in the past. That being said your organization doesn't look too far from ordinary. A lot of small business are built just like you outline. If you really want to restructure the best solution I have found is setting up an OU with block group policy inheritance at the root of your domain. Build your new structure under this ...


6

I think you need to read The Machine SID Duplication Myth: http://blogs.technet.com/b/markrussinovich/archive/2009/11/03/3291024.aspx Machine SIDs and domain SIDs/RIDs are two different things, which is why you see two different things when you run a local tool on the machine, versus an Active Directory Powershell cmdlet. A couple of notes from the ...


6

Most software installation programs for Windows require Administrator rights to function properly. This is an artifact of the design (or lack thereof, some might say) of the Windows platform. While there is an increasing trend toward software that installs only within the writable directories accessible to a limited (i.e. non-Administrator) user (things like ...


6

This can dramatically slow down logons (as expected), but you can force all logon scripts to run before giving a desktop with the GPO policy User Configuration\Administrative Templates\System\Scripts\Run logon scripts synchronously See http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc975925.aspx for more details


6

As already commented, the "Account is sensitive and cannot be delegated" flag is a user account attribute, not a GPO setting. If you've checked this box and want to make sure that the change is immediately replicated everywhere, you can use repadmin to force it: repadmin /replsingleobj * source-dc01.domain.tld CN=SensitiveUser,OU=Users,DC=domain,DC=tld


6

I don't know of any GPO policy on its own that will do this, but the registry key to do this is HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Advanced\HideIcons Set to 1 to hide the icons. If you change the registry directly you'll need to log off and back on to affect the change.


6

If these systems are members of an Active Directory domain you can use group policy to add a group of admin users to the Local Administrators group. If these systems are members of a domain but the users are local, you can use Restricted Groups to produce the desired effect. If these computers are not members of an AD domain you can use PowerShell to ...


6

You can specify the managedBy attribute, and check the box for "Manager can update membership list". (This grants write permission for the Member attribute.) The person(s) who need to edit the group may be able to do it with the DSQuery widget, for which you can create the following shortcut: rundll32 dsquery,OpenQueryWindow They can search for the ...


5

There are settings in the Server 2008/2012 policies that aren't accessible on your 2003 server I believe, such as "Do not connect to any Windows Update Internet locations" under the Computer settings you show above. I believe the settings you are looking for in a 2003 environment are: Disable access to Windows Update The correct policy for v6 ...


5

The only way for domain computers to get updated group policy settings is if they have connectivity to a domain controller at a time when they are refreshing their group policy settings. Group Policy is refreshed: At computer startup (foreground refresh of Computer settings) At user logon (foreground refresh of User settings) Periodically in the background ...


5

The only thing I can think of to solve this is a trick where you use an intermediate group as a dynamic object and then nest that into the primary group so that the user has the permissions conferred to the primary group by way of nested group membership, however, the intermediate group has a TTL (time to live, the entry-TTL attribute) and when that TTL ...


5

What you're talking about is a feature called "fine-grained password policies", and requires a domain functional level of Server 2008 or higher. There's a nice, easy step-by-step instruction guide on enabling and using fine-grained password policies on the Technet blogs, if you'd like to take a look, but it's not all that complicated. The thing that trips ...


5

That's not a very sound recovery strategy. You cannot simply re-create the same naming and expect things to work. Every object in AD has a security identifier (SID). Creating a lot of objects with the same names might look the same to you, but to AD they are all completely different because the SIDs will differ. You should look into the proper way to backup ...


5

Another couple common spots to look for problems like this are listed in my screenshots below. You've likely checked these settings, but in case you haven't, it would be worth your while to do so. Obviously we're dealing with User Preferences here and you already know that, but for the sake of future users reading this question I'll give the location in ...


5

Domain Controllers have their own local security policies, just like regular domain members do. Group Policies will also take precedence/override local security policies, just as they do on regular domain members. As you have witnessed, there are plenty of Group Policy settings that have the ability to "tattoo," or leave their mark on a system's local ...


5

Simply use the "Apply to All users except local administrators" setting in the Software Restriction Policies Enforcement... you don't let all your users run as Administrator... do you??? As an alternative, perhaps you could define the Software Restriction Policies in the User Configuration portion of the GPO, then use Security Filtering to allow that GPO ...


5

Yes it will be applied. The Winning is relevant to identical settings being applied by each GPO. The Winning GPO has precedence and will have it's settings applied. If another GPO configures other settings (not in common with the Winning GPO) then it will have those settings set. ...


4

That sounds more like you've got an old script with a NET USE * ... command in it, and less like a problem with Group Policy Preference. Using drive letters starting with "Z:" and moving backwards is exactly the behavior of NET USE *. I'd run a "Resultant Set of Policy" as that user and take a look at all the scripts assigned to run as Logon Scripts. I'd ...


4

First off, don't use the Software Installation GPOs. They suck. Second off, make sure you have the proper "offline" Java installer. Then, create a startup script, and put it a GPO at \Computer configuration\Policies\Windows Settings\Scripts\Startup to install it. Must be a startup script, not a logon script, since startup scripts run under SYSTEM ...



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