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The previous answer should work but thought i'd mention 'Yum-utils' can make this simpler Check what kernels are installed with: rpm -q kernel install yum utils: yum install yum-utils Package cleanup where count is how many kernels you want to retain: package-cleanup --oldkernels --count=2


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I think your plan is overly complicated. The files you're suggesting to remove in step 2 are likely all owned by the relevant kernel package anyway. On my test RHEL 6 machine: $ rpm -qf /boot/initramfs-2.6.32-573.18.1.el6.x86_64.img kernel-2.6.32-573.18.1.el6.x86_64 etc. So step 1 should remove everything. As for what to remove, rpm -qa kernel\* will ...


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How the change GRUB kernel on redhat 7 version To list all the menu entries that will be displayed at system boot, issue the following command: # awk -F\' '$1=="menuentry " {print i++ " : " $2}' /etc/grub2.cfg 0 : Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (3.10.0-327.18.2.el7.x86_64) 7.2 (Maipo) 1 : Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (3.10.0-327.10.1.el7.x86_64) 7.2 ...


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change GRUB_DEFAULT=0 in /etc/default/grub to the number that you want, now you need to regenarate the grub2 config using grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2/grub.cfg


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Had the same thing today. Turns out it's caused by grub-probe trying to access partitions through /dev/sda, which is not cache-coherent with /dev/sda1 (and sda2 etcetera). You can fix it using blockdev --flushbufs /dev/sda1 (repeat for other partitions as necessary).


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You need to update your GRUB and boot kernel installation. update-initramfs -u This command updates your boot kernel configuration to match the current state of your system. mdadm --detail --scan > /tmp/mdadm.conf Copy /tmp/mdadm.conf contents to /etc/mdadm/mdadm.conf replacing any previous entries. This way the MD device configuration information ...



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