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5

My general rule of thumb is that if the errors are continuing to rise unexpectedly, the disk needs replaced; if it's static, there might have been some transient condition that caused the error, and the system's not reproducing the conditions that caused problems. A few checksum errors doesn't necessarily indicate anything bad mechanically with the drive (...


3

Having those errors across multiple drives seems to indicate a backplane/controller/cabling problem more than a disk or RAM issue.


2

One disk at a time. Let each drive rebuild successfully, then replace the next drive. That's all. (replacing all disks at the same time == data loss - don't do that!)


2

DVR drives are tuned for sequential IO workloads. Random IO speeds will suffer if you use these, but depending on your load and IO profile, this may not be a problem.


2

/dev/sdc2 failed. It will need to be replaced.


1

Well I tried it and it worked. Turns out new revisions of SAS are compatible with hardware supporting only an older revision of SAS. (though they do not get the higher throughput supported) I'm not aware of any capacity ceiling on older SAS hardware. I did stick with the same brand Seagate, though I wouldn't be surprised if any brand of SAS drive would work....


1

People generally speak about bit rot in regards to RAID rebuilds, as it is the worst time to encounter a unrecoverable read error. Issues with rebuilds can generally be boiled down to 3 areas. hardware failure (during a rebuild), user error, and poor maintenance. I have seen lots of users try to "recover" a RAID volume, and just make things worse for ...



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