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1) What is the RAM usage of your VPS? If it is running peak, you probably need to upgrade it. 2) WHat is the disk I/O when you say it is running 100%. Some provider limits IOPs which turns into lower disk I/O performance. 3) If above are fine, mongoperf and mongotop will be the option for you to start troubleshooting with ...


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Actually found the answer, inside bios select "load defaults" and press ok. That did it.


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You should look at the data sheets and technical specifications of the drives you want to compare. Each vendor gives detailed information about specified power-on hours (continuuous operation, divide by 24 or 8 for days/workdays) power on/off cycles (if your desktops are shut down frequently) head parking cycles (if you switch between idle and load ...


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There's two things here for you to know - many systems have multiple disks installed and that's fine but any given disk has what's known as a 'Duty Cycle' - this is the amount of time it's designed to run in order to maintain it's specified reliability figures. Most/many top end disks have a 'Duty Cycle' of 100%, meaning they can be operated hard for their ...


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It is usually SATA so yes it will work in any computer, a NAS is a computer as well. Whether it makes sense or not is a different question. These drives usually are designed to be low-power which often means 5400 rpm. This means you get longer seek time over regular desktop drives. Throughput will largely depend on the controller and RAID level in this ...


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With the 2950 getting to be old hardware, there are quite a few becoming available at very low prices. I have one running on Linux Mint 17.3, with a SATA RAID array, and it's working. There are the usual problems, such as fan noise from so many small fans moving a lot of air 1: You don't need an interposer card. The caddy has two sets of screw holes, one ...


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You have several choices: Cheap USB 2.0 stick: not recommended because they are slow and the writes will kill most of them pretty quickly, exception: a read-only system like SmartOS (for ZFS) or ESXi (no ZFS, just as an example) which only writes at bootup or once an hour and keeps everything else in RAM or your data pools. More expensive USB 3.0 stick ...


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For something of this scale, use a separate drive or pair of drives for the OS. Perhaps the M.2 SSD slot is the most appropriate. Give ZFS the full disks and don't attempt to spread the OS across those drives. For home-scale, don't listen to all of the suggestions to get a ZIL and L2ARC. The ZIL is only useful for synchronous writes, and the L2ARC is ...


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Yes, but you'll probably lose 2 TB, because only 3 TB will be used on each of the new drives.


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The control disk is connected to a SATA port built into the motherboard. As stated, the disks experiencing the journal flush time out issues are connected to the PERC, the same controller that the 'problematic' Toshiba's are connected to. The PERC 310 is only a basic hardware raid card. It's CPU is probably easily overwhelmed, either that or there is ...


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This is a lot to digest. You're using ZFS, so there's a good chance that this is an issue with the 5TB disks in your pool and potentially your pool setup. These may be 4k-sector disks, so some accommodations should be made in your ZFS setup to account for that. Can you provide your df -h, fdisk -l, zpool list, zpool status -v and zfs list output?


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It depends on the underlying file system. If df says the disk is full, possible reasons are : you are not mounting the root of the NFS 100 G file system, and there are other files that you do not see because they are higher up than your mount point. you are mounting some other file system on top of the problem file system, and so hiding files there are ...


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If the disk is not a boot disk you can do the following: add a new disk with the required size and format it. mount the new disk cp -r --preserve=all /mnt/disk1/. /mnt/disk2/ edit the /etc/fstab to mount the new disk instead the old one If you have standard disk and you want to shorten the cp time. You can first create new ssd disk from snapshot and copy ...


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It seems that the power plug cables were not ok, I changed the power plug cables from the psu to the backplane, now everything is working - I was able to test 1,5Gb/s without a single disk I/O error. Still can't imagine how this could happen.


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Thanks for the solution on top! Since I am not allowed to comment the answer with the script I have to add my tiny enhancement myself. I just tuned it a little for more convenience so that one only has to define the device. fdisk will deliver the number of sectors: #!/bin/bash # add device to mangle # example: # disk=/dev/sde disk= # get number of sectors ...


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As you correctly state, all Azure disk storage (except for temporary disks) are replicated 3 times in the same DC, and if you use geo replication than another 3 times in another DC, so realistically disk failure is an unlikely cause. There are a few reasons I could think of that might explain this: As HopelesNoob mention, it could be data corruption, if ...


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8x 5400 RPM disks will generally outperform 4x 7200 RPM disks, save for single-threaded sequential read/write. As your use case (virtual machines) is rich of small random reads/writes, you should prefer the solution with more spindles (ie: the more the disks, the better). Anyway, considered how cheap are 7200 RPM disks, I strongly suggest to use 8x such ...



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