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0

To be 100% sure that your data are really gone when you delete a file, you had to be sure that it is impossible to do a filesystem undelete; even with raw access to the device, it should be impossible to recover data in a consistent/significant manner simply by scanning (reading) the device. To accomplish both points in the simplest way, I suggest you to ...


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First, check if there is any quota set in owncloud config. If there isn't, check how your disk is partitioned. Is the whole 1TB under / filesystem, or is it divided into smaller /, /home, /boot and so on. df -h shows this clearly.


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Which version of MySQL server do you use? After 5.5 you can use the performance_schema to get realtime statistics from the database. I'd start querying the table_io_waits_summary_by_table table_io_waits_summary_by_table table_lock_waits_summary_by_table to see what is happening exactly. An another solution would be if you check the buffer pool ...


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Let us read the manual page for the underlying library call: Programs can use posix_fadvise() to announce an intention to access file data in a specific pattern in the future, thus allowing the kernel to perform appropriate optimizations. The advice applies to a (not necessarily existent) region starting at offset and extending for len bytes (or ...


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Resilvering is a vdev optionation, as you implied only the storage devices in that vdev are used to rebuild the new device. I'm not sure why it quotes the full size of the zpool, but I suspect the developers borrowed code from the scrub functions, or that it simply quotes the full zpool size as that would be the worst case scenario.


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For future visitors: I got the same error 3 days ago and the reason was that Windows 8.1 corrupted entire file system in my HDD in Dell Studio. Condition: Windows was not loading and computer kept restarting on boot. Dell diagnostic clearly mentioned that HDD not found. Error: 0141 Resolution: When I tried to use Ubuntu live DVD to see if other ...


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I changed the following option in my *.vmx file: mem.hotadd = "FALSE" By default it is set to "TRUE". I've not seen any issues changing it... I don't have any CentOS VMs running on MS Hyper-V so, dig in and see what options are available to fix this issue.


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FYI the same server type can have different backplanes for a server model, in your case you have a SCSI Backplane as the guys have already told you. Unfortunate mistake. little point buying the adapters as they won't fit in your hotswap environment, just buy the SCSI drives those SSDs will come in handy later..


1

There are products for this but they are converters not adapters so are higher priced. One example is: ARS-2320S Ultra320 SCSI-to-SATA II Hard Disk Drive non Hot SWAP As mentioned by others your server and old drive use the SCA 80 pin connector which pre-dates SATA/SAS and was used to provide hotplug support for SCSI drives.


7

Oh my... What the heck are you trying to do?!? This is a bit of a square-peg in a round-hole issue. SCSI is not SATA or SAS. Your Dell server is a PowerEdge 1850, which featured parallel SCSI (Ultra-320 SCSI) drives. These disks connected to an 80-pin SCA connector on the drive cage backplane. SATA and Serial-Attached-SCSI (SAS) superseded the old ...


0

I've got a NeXTStation slab, and I'm trying figure out why it doesn't boot. I removed the drive from the NeXTStation and installed it in old PC (IBM Z Pro) with an onboard UltraWide SCSI controller. I found an adapter which converts from the 80-pin UW-connector to the old style 50-pin connector used by SCSI-1 drives. Other obvious choices could be digging up ...


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Is the backup a USB disk? Sometime, I saw long-standing USB disks (eg: ones that are attached to a machine with long uptime and are not removed often) give all kind of errors, behaving erratically. If it your case and the message refers to the USB disk, the message itself is effectively harmless. Here you can find some more information.


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The error decode is Bh/4Bh/0Bh = ABORTED_COMMAND/NAK_RECEIVED. I wrote my own tool to decode these and try to give a basic assessment at http://scsi.ev-en.org/ These errors indicate that you have a bad link somewhere, most often it is a bad cable but it can also be a bad port on either side (drive or slot).


2

When ruggedized hard drive purpose-built technologies like RDX exist... This seems silly to worry about the handling of the drive. If it really is a problem, are you sure it's not a people issue? If it DOES require a technological solution, Google "ruggedized hard drive". There are plenty of options in the consumer and enterprise realms for this.


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While it may make sense to use an external HDD to transfer from your onsite location to your offsite location, you should not be using an external HDD as your offsite backup.


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No, the test does not continue after the first bad sector is detected. From smartctl man page: selftest - [ATA] prints the SMART self-test log. The disk maintains a self-test log showing the results of the self tests, which can be run using the '-t' option described below. For each of the most recent twenty-one self-tests, the log shows the type of test ...


1

Since the two disks are exactly the same size and need to contain exactly the same data, you could use dd: dd if=/dev/sdb of=/dev/sda bs=16M You'll need to boot from a live use though. Please check the if(in file) and of(out file) statements from the live usb. Once you start dd(disk destroyer), there's no going back.


1

Another consideration is power usage (which is often billed). While 2.5" use less power per drive than 3.5" drives, because they are not available at higher capacities they use more power per GB.


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Use 2.5" disks for enterprise SAS workloads and 3.5" for bulk and high-capacity storage. You've answered your own question. Buy the right type of server for your anticipated workload. If you need high performance drives, optimize for that. If you need a lot of storage, then focus on that. Small-form-factor (2.5") disks are available in the following ...


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It is a cost/performance vs capacity question. 2.5" HDD, at the same RPM/rotational delay, have a performance advantage versus their taller brother by the virtue of the smaller platter area. This in turn permit lower seek time (because the head had to travel a physically shorter distance). At the same time, this means that total platter area (read: ...



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