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As far as I know, and as supported by this article, you can setup a RAID array of different size disks, but the array will end up sized as Number of Disks * Smallest Disk. Can I create an md(4) RAID array out of block devices of unequal size? Yes, but the RAID array will have the size of the smallest block device (plus some overheads for its own ...


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No. In a raid, every member drive must be the same size, it is unavoidable. Otherwise, where could be mapped the upper 2TB of your new drives? But, what you can do: Partition your new drives to have two-two 2TB partitions, Grow your old array to include the lower 2-2 TB partitions from your disks (mdadm --grow /dev/md0 --raid-devices=5) And finally, you ...


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mount -o remount,rw /mountpoint


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Short of patching your kernel, I don't think you can. During shutdown, the scsi disk driver issues a SYNCHRONIZE CACHE command to flush the disk's internal cache. This will cause the drive to spin up, then the drive is spun down again before shutting down.


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I have a Adaptec card running just fine with the HP DL320e and the new trays. It does show the drives working, but of course not any of the other led indications. But I am having some trouble right now to swap the standard cable for a longer one to the backplane... so maybe there is something going on there... but not sure what that would be... looks like a ...


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Can I just place this in the new server? Yes Do I need to go through any steps to convert the VMs? No Is there anything else to consider? You might want to convert the VMFS on the disk to the latest version.


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Yes, you should be concerned. Not extremely concerned, but investigate it and - if necessary - replace some parts. SCSI errors are usually generated by: problems with drivers/firmware or hardware faults. Refer to: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Key_Code_Qualifier At minimum though, a SCSI error means 'something went wrong'. This may only be a minor ...


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Your disk had read errors and should be considered as dead. Replace it.


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After hours of Googling and some extremely wise help from JyZyXEL in the #linux-raid Freenode channel, we have a solution! There was not a single interruption to the RAID array during this process - exactly what I needed and expected from mdadm. For some (currently unknown) reason, the RAID state became frozen. The winning command to figure this out is cat ...


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As already stated, you had first to resize the partition containing the logical volume, than you can proceed with LVM resize. Follow these steps: with fdisk -l -u /dev/sda take note of the current partition setting (especially the start sector) delete partition sda2 and recreate it. Use the very same start sector, or you will lose your data! Obviously, ...


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Assuming this is a hardware RAID 1+0 and there's a controller managing the devices, just let the drive fail. Imagine this were a spinning hard disk. Do you care why or how it failed... or just that it failed? RAID controllers use a variety of parameters to determine drive and array health. S.M.A.R.T. statistics are just one element of this... But an SSD ...


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Write capacity is one of the biggest myths surrounding SSDs, and was only really an issue with the very early drives. Most SSDs will last decades before reaching their write capacity - well beyond the useful life of any drive. See this article for more info. That said, if you really want to check how much data has been written to an SSD, you should be able ...


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You can check this in cloudwatch Check for EBS Metrics and choose VolumeWriteOps (Metric Name) take any sample from the graph for e.g. Data-point : 152398 at 2011-02-10T07:54+0000 (Any highest count from the graph) so it means 152398 IOPS for 10 mins intervel calculate this for 1 min 152398 IOPS / 10 minutes = 15239.8 IOPS/minute then calculate ...


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I'm a bit iffy on the competence bit. I'm a IT management grad and they don't teach you squat about hardware. There's a few simple truths here At some point of time dead hardware is dead hardware. Time/effort costs money. You may not be able to fix this Hard drives arn't free well unless you have a service contract that covers everything. We do. Our ...


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Such catastrophic failures can be caused only by a much higher voltage on the power rail. It should be relatively simple to use a multimeter to measure the current/voltage going to the SATA power connector. As you mention a (custom built) backplane: have you tried to connect a single hard disk directly to the power connector, bypassing the ...


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You cannot extract SMART information from a RAID array. The array does have SMART information, the drives that make it do. Dev sda is a RAID, not a unit (sd0, sd1 / sda1, sdb1 etc). So extract your information from disk units, not array.


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You should take a look at atop, which combines the power of iotop/top/iftop, all in one place, and highlights the critical parts on your system.


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No, this is not possible. Most hardware RAID controllers forbid the creation of arrays of mixed media; e.g. SATA and SAS together or SAS and SSD. The array would not accept an SSD replacement for a failed SAS/SATA mechanical drive.



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