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Assuming you want to save /dev/sdXN to /tgtfs/image.rawand you are root: mkdir /srcfs && mount /dev/sdXN /srcfs Use zerofill or just: dd if=/dev/zero of=/srcfs/tmpzero.txt to fill unused blocks with zero (wait for it fill the file system completely then rm /srcfs/tmpzero.txt) Take the image with dd and use conv=sparse to punch zeros on-the-fly: dd ...


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Check VMFS for metadata inconsistency, it's done with VMware Ondisk Metadata Analyser Before you start VOMA from the CLI of your ESXi host, take care of the following guidelines: Shut down all virtual machines running on the VMFS datastore make sure that the VMFS volume is not in use by other hosts (best practice: unmount the datastore on the other ...


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If you actually use arcconf you can see physical drive status like this: arcconf getconfig 1 PD Look for drives with Failed state to identify drives that have been marked as failed. For your reference the output would look something like this: Device #6 Device is a Hard drive State : Failed Block Size ...


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My company has three datacenters. They bought drives from Newegg and stuck them in one of the Dell servers to see what would happen. It's been fine for two years. The only problem is that they can't reboot it remotely. If you reboot it it stays stuck on its POST screen until you clear the warnings complaining that it doesn't have real Dell drives in it.


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OEMs test some drives (or change the firmware slightly and get them rebranded as theres) with there servers, and that can give you piece of mind. I typically use regular drives in my servers, and have come across a couple of issues - Using drives > 2tb in an HP system didn't work, and using regular consumer grade drives in an Intel server was ...


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I'll play devil's advocate here. If you are considering name-brand ENTERPRISE GRADE drives, with appropriate specifications, then in general they will be fine in commodity x64 servers. If you are considering CONSUMER GRADE drives, you are taking your chances. Other posters and commenters have explained the difference in quality and performance ...


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In addition to the other valid remarks: That particular drive, the Samsung 845DC is in the words of the manufacturer "designed for read intensive, <10% write content" and a write lifetime of 600TB which, depending on the IO profile of your VM's, may result in an early death, not covered by the 5 year warranty. Server SSD's are typically specified for ...


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This all depends. If HP or IBM, I'd say use their respective drives. (just because) If Dell, probably use their drives... If you can't afford the Dell-spec'd disks, look harder. But refurbished Dell disks if you have to in order to save money and retain support. But also know that Dell PERC RAID controllers are manufactured by LSI, and LSI controllers ...


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The manufacturers have spent time validating OEM drives and possibly creating custom firmware to deal with compatibility/optimisation issues with specifically their RAID controllers. There is some value but it is very untangible. Some products simply won't accept non-proprietary drives. Also until very recently server grade SSD products simply were not ...


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I would agree w/ what @ewwhite said insofar as you have a really non-ideal situation here. If the other admin was kind enough to mirror the "System Reserved" partition to the other disk you could probably get away w/ booting a Windows 2012 setup DVD and running: bootsect /nt60 ALL That'll write a Windows "6.0" MBR to the disk, which in turn will attempt to ...


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I thought this was answered in: Combine 2 logical raid 0 drives to 1 logical raid 1 drive If you (or the previous admin) used software RAID on the hardware array, you really need to ditch it. There's no option to rebuild or do this the right way? Perhaps shape the hardware array the way you want it to look, then restore from backup? Outside of that, I ...



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