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1

If your controller is recognized by dmraid (for instance here) on linux, you may be able to use ddrescue to recover the failed disk to a new one, and use dmraid to build the array, instead of your hardware controller.


2

To answer "How could two hard drives fail simultaneously like that?" precisely, I'd like to quote from this article: The crux of the argument is this. As disk drives have become larger and larger (approximately doubling in two years), the URE (unrecoverable read error) has not improved at the same rate. URE measures the frequency of occurrence of ...


7

After you accepted a bad answer, I am really sorry for my heretic opinion (which saved such arrays multiple times already). Your second failed disk has probably a minor problem, maybe a block failure. This is the cause, why the bad sync tool of your bad raid5 firmware crashed on it. You could easily make a sector-level copy with a lowlevel disk cloning ...


0

Some common methods, you have to see what your model supports: Export all drives as JBOD. You'll end up with n drives you can wipe separately. Export them as RAIDx with max capacity, again without a spare. If you see a drive with the expected capacity in the OS, wiping this should also destroy all data. See if the controller offers a specific feature ...


0

Without knowing what this enclosure was connected so, I'm going to make some assumptions. If you were connected to a RAID controller, just delete the logical drives/virtual drives/RAID groups. That's usually good enough. Your RAID controller may also have an option to wipe the drives. Also, SAS-to-USB adapters don't exist. Otherwise, this is too much ...


1

Typically when purchasing drives in a lot from a reputable reseller you can request that the drives come from different batches, which is important for reasons stated above. Next, this is precisely why RAID 1+0 exists. If you had used 6 drives in RAID 1+0 you would have had 9TB of data with immediate redundancy where no rebuilding of a volume is necessary. ...


3

Simultaneous failure is possible, even probable, for the reasons others have given. The other possibility is that one of the disks had failed some time earlier, and you weren't actively checking it. Make sure your monitoring would pick up a RAID volume running in degraded mode promptly. Maybe you didn't get an option but it's never good to have to learn ...


33

Your options are: Restoring from backups. You do have backups, don't you? RAID is not a backup. Professional data recovery It's possible, though very expensive and not guaranteed, that a professional recovery service will be able to recover your data. Accepting your data loss and learning from the experience. As noted in the comments, large SATA ...


30

You have a double disk failure. This means your data is gone, and you will have to restore from a backup. This is why we aren't supposed to use raid 5 on large disks. You want to set up your raid so you always have the ability to withstand two disk failures, especially with large slow disks.


1

I almost wanted to install Dell's OMSA tool. But it says on the Wiki page Fedora: The community releases are officially unsupported in this repository. You can, however, fake it by editing the yum config and changing "fc" to "el5". This is completely unsupported. If it breaks you can keep all the pieces. Luckily after further Googling, I found ...


2

Usually installing the megaraid tools from lsi would work. Make sure to read the readme to install 32 bit libraries, and to start the vivaldi service. I don't think they are certified for fedora, though - the rpms are for rhel5/6. Not sure if source rpm exists, or if generic linux is supported.


5

Converting a live boot/root disk to RAID is a lot of magic and usually it is not worth the effort. You are better off with moving to the new disk first. Start it up as a degraded raid-1, copy the contents (not clone). Then work on booting the system from it. Depending on the OS used that can be a lot of fun too. After you are able to boot from the new ...


0

You can see the SMART status of the disks with the smartctl command and it's -d argument. For example, to see the first disk in the array: # smartctl -a /dev/sda -d sat+megaraid,00 smartctl 5.43 2012-06-30 r3573 [x86_64-linux-2.6.32-358.6.2.el6.x86_64] (local build) Copyright (C) 2002-12 by Bruce Allen, http://smartmontools.sourceforge.net === START OF ...


1

There is no way to know the underlying device status/hierarchy without using a tools that can talk to a RAID driver. For example if you use MegaSAS RAID controllers, Linux only recognizes "sda", and to see details you have to use special tool called megacli. So, you have to either turn off your motherboard RAID and use linux mdraid, in which case you will ...



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