Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

19

Note: This answer is specific to the server components described in the OP's comment. Compatibility is going to dictate everything here. Dell PERC array controllers are LSI devices. So anything that works on an LSI controller should be okay. Your ability to monitor the health of your RAID array is paramount. Since this is Dell, ensure you have the ...


8

Yes, the SSDs will be way faster than the SAS drives. For sequential throughput, a good RAID of SAS drives might do pretty well, but for random access, the SSDs will blow them out of the water which can result in a very noticeable performance difference. Depending on the particular SAS drives and the particular SSD drives, the SSDs may have a better ...


8

What you have probably heard is that for RAID5 configurations using large disks problems can arise under some circumstances. These problems are not an issue for RAID 1 as the rebuild I/O is less than that of RAID5. What's the recommended size? - that which will do the job with some elbow room for expansion. we will be running daily backup so we can just ...


7

Consumer grade SSDs will work fine in many servers for use cases. They are way, way faster then SAS disks. I'd suggest the reason to get enterprise disks over consumer disks is not the speed, its the read-write cycles and better engineering - for example supercaps are present in some enterprise SSD's where the consumer grade version does not have this - ...


6

If you are using them for writes, to avoid data corruption in the event of power failure you need to make sure that you only consider models with a supercap. Eg. Intel S3500, Samsung 845DC Pro Otherwise consumer SSDs are more suited to caching.


5

The performance inconsistency of consumer SSDs can cause problems with some raid controllers, the spikes in I/O latency are exacerbated when using a raid controller as it often will not be using TRIM (I don't know of any controller that does). Enterprise drives are designed around consistent performance even without TRIM so they typically play well with RAID ...


5

The reason to go with enterprise grade gear is reliability more than speed. Most consumer SSDs are MLC, with the lower end stuff being TLC (MLC does 2 bits a cell, TLC does 3, and they're less performant, and reliable than SLC). At some point, they may also drop the onboard ram cache to save costs, as nand cells get cheaper. A enterprise SSD also has greater ...


4

Even consumer-grade SSDs are much faster than the faster 15k HDDs, so from a performance standpoint they will be fine (if using the right disk and if overprovisioning them), but you had to carefully pick them, especially due to how they interact with hardware-based RAID controller... First, check if affordable, entry-level enterprise grade drive (as Intel ...


3

I don't think it's worth using this server in ANY situation right now. Even an entry-level modern $500 system will be more capable and robust. I'm not sure I understand the desire to use something for "non-critical functions" just because it's there. To answer your specific questions, though, Ultra 320 SCSI drives topped out at 300GB 15k RPM before SAS/SATA ...


2

it is not good idea to store your backup data on the same disk, because if the disk fails someday, you will lost the data. I will suggest you to keep your backups on the separate disk, cloud or tape solution. This way you will prevent lost important data. As for the disk, I will suggest you to calculate how much disk space you will need with eventual growth ...


1

Why do you want to put one pair of huge disks in there, when you have a server running a database? If you want to look at performance, try putting your database on different disks than your OS / web application. Databases are often bottle-necked on I/O. In stead of purchasing 2x 2TB disks, you could buy 2x 320GB disks for the OS / web app, and 2x 128GB SSD ...


1

check your mainboard manual for diagnosing errors. Normally you have a speaker or LED control which tells you what part may be faulty. The speaker often is not connected, so you wont notice the beeps.


1

From both the server spec sheet and the SmartArray 6i manual, the maximum HDD size is capped at 300 GB. While I think that this is not an hard limit, the fact that you had to use old Ultra320 disks (not newer SAS ones), let me think that you can not buy bigger disk at all. Regarding the supported disks, from my understanding HP controller have no problem in ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible