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10

Yes, they're completely hot-swappable. Think of them the same way as cables (note the link lights). Same for SFP+ direct-attach cables. It wouldn't make sense for them not to be hot-swappable. Heck, most network switches don't even have power switches :)


10

Typically, co-location providers build out the rack electrical on-demand to customer specifications. Due to the variances in provisioning and client requirements, it doesn't make sense to waste the effort of pre-provisioning power until the rack space is sold. New racks... no power feeds (I had to wait 12 hours for Union electricians) With power!! You ...


10

Yes, it's a bit old school. Modern hardware doesn't just fail that often. Focus either on making your applications more highly-available (not always possible), or on the items needed to make your individual hosts more resilient... For hosts: Buy better hardware. Ensure you have support contracts. REGISTER your servers' support contracts (spare parts are ...


7

It's rather inefficient - not least because of the dependency on manual intervention to make the switch. I have worked at places that run a hot DR site - literally, identical servers to the primary, ready to go instantly. However the DR switchover is an automated process - we're not talking cabling, a bit of fiddling and a switch, but a process when we ...


6

Generally yes they are, certainly I've never come across any that weren't - in particular I know for a fact that the top three on your list are, not used the bottom one so can't say with the same degree of confidence.


5

The answer here depends on the specific model of server being used. I was holding off until the OP could describe the actual server being used, as the SSD options vary. Read through the descriptions of HP's SSD portfolio for detailed information on the different classes of drive. For instance, with a G6 or G7 ProLiant, all SSD performance will be ...


4

The fact that it is old school doesn't necessarily make the use of a hot spare a bad idea. Your main concern should be the rationale, what are the risks you run, and how does running a hot spare mitigate them. Because in my perception your hot spare only addresses hardware failure, which is although not uncommon, neither the only operational risk you run, ...


4

Sobrique explains how the manual intervention causes your proposed solution to be sup-optimal, and ewwhite talks about probability of failure of various components. Both of those IMO make very good points and should be strongly considered. There is however one issue that nobody seems to have commented on at all so far, which surprises me a little. You ...


4

Some of this hinges on the hardware involved. I prefer RAID 1+0 for simplicity and rebuild times. It's tough to give a generic answer without more details, though... Things to consider: The disks installed in the system: SAS? SATA? Nearline SAS? This impacts the failure rate and failure mode, as well as array rebuild times. The anticipated use for ...


3

I found the technical specs on insight for the HP drives: Specfications -> Performance -> 4KB Random Read 63000 IOPS 4KB Random Write 19200 IOPS Drive Transfer Rate 600 MBps (external) Internal Data Rate 480 MBps (read) / 185 MBps (write) I then looked up the Samsung Evo 840 specs, this case taken from [ebuyer], this case a 120GB ...


3

The HP Solid State Drives (SSD) Quickspecs document likely has all the details you need. Besides raw speed and IOPS a large part in price difference between what HP calls Value Endurance, Mainstream Endurance and Enterprise Performance is how often the complete disk can be overwritten, because flash supports only a limited number of write cycles. I ...


3

Two things... You can add a warranty to an HP server whose factory warranty lapsed. It's not very expensive to add another year of support to the machine you have now. You can also initiate a per-incident support call/technician with HP and be liable for parts charges. Depends on how desperate you are... But here's a (lengthy) troubleshooting ...


2

Most colocation companies charge per rack unit, 1 of which is 1.75" high. Some will allow you to have a shelf, and if you've purchased enough rack units, allow you to put into the cabinet whatever you please, so long as it's safe and remains within your allocated power consumption. If the box is too heavy for the shelf (unless the shelf bolts at both the ...


2

The concept of having a hot or even cold spare is dependent how the application(s) are built in the first place. What I mean is that if the application has been built in such a way that the data and service load is spread across multiple machines then the concept of any single machine taking the system down should go away. In that situation you don't need ...


2

I bought 6 of the 1.2tb cards in the last couple months. One of them has already failed. So I would absolutely raid them. I used windows active disk mirror. The drive failed with the message "missing LEB map". I was told it would need to be swapped out. But to get the RMA approved I would need to take pictures on both sides of the failed card (requiring a ...


2

This actually looks like a problem with your server's motherboard. We can see from your dmesg output that it is failing to communicate correctly with the PCIe card in the failing server, but works correctly in a different server. So you most likely have a bad PCIe slot, or bad motherboard components. You can try using a different PCIe slot, if you have ...


2

If you are looking to put 10KW in a single rack, power is only going to be 1 of your worries. Heat Rejection is going to be the other. Rack power is determined by the PDU(s) that are installed in it. if you are starting to pull >1kw per outlet you would probably want High Density PDUs and to feed the antminers 208V as opposed to 110/120V (less amps more ...


1

The load imposed by a DHCP server with that number of clients is pretty minimal, so any reasonably modern computer would suffice. Bear in mind that you might want to hold on to your DHCP logs for a while, so plan to allocate some disk space to that. However, you should think carefully about redundancy. If your DHCP server fails, it could be pretty ...


1

We use devices like this in our datacenter. They're called KVM switches (abbreviation for "keyboard, video and mouse"). The "over the network" part is solved by IPKVM. I can recommend ATEN Hope that helps.


1

The difference lies in the intended application of the CPU... Granted, I come from a world where I don't assemble servers from discrete components, but rather purchase purpose-built equipment (from a manufacturer... with a warranty...) If I were in the market for an AMD-based server system, the candidates would all use server-specific Opteron CPUs... The FX ...


1

These are the decisions that will shape your company, your company culture, how your employees work, how they feel about work, how productive they are, how your development and deployment processes work - other people can't really answer them for you. Thin clients have the advantage of cost compared to laptops or desktops, but they are slower to use (all ...


1

Some things come to mind: Some form of dust/dirt (chalk, talc, cement, gypsum, flour, salt). Does it come off if you plug a cable in/out a couple of times ? Shouldn't effect operation, but check the fan's that they aren't clogged first. (Use an air-duster.) Could be some form of corrosion (rust). If that is the case I would dispose of the switches. No ...


1

Ask your prospective hoster. The fans not only on the back will be a major problem though, not only for mechanical reasons but for thermal management as well. Most data centers are planned around hot and cold aisles and the hot air needs to get out to the back.



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