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You can use lspci to see what's connected to the PCI bus, lsusb for usb bus, and then there is dmidecode (# man dmidecode for more on it). The /proc filesystem has hardware information too. For example, CPU and memory: # less /proc/cpuinfo # less /proc/meminfo Hope that's what you're looking for.


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Enable the IOMMU option in the BIOS setup


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CentOS yum install watchdog On Ubuntu apt-get install watchdog #optional #apt-get install das-watchdog Then... sudo vi /etc/watchdog.conf Of course you should know that in VIM the colon (:) button opens the menu (or rather, command line) and w tells it to write your changes, or w! forces it to, and q quits. (Also that you can use the old ZX Spectrum ...


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A single broken fan should never cause this kind of "critical" (that's what health light = red means) problem. Your server has probably six hot swappable fans that create a wind tunnel through the chassis, so if five are really up then you should be fine IMO. You need to get a handle on what component is failing/has failed/is getting too hot. Use HP ...


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Log onto the ILO3 interface and it will tell you exactly what the server's health history and specific problems are within the IML log. This is the best option for a VMware installation since you likely don't have the HP-specific ESXi build running on your system. You should also replace the failed fan.


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With DELL, it's a bit complicated, specially for: Firmware updates (when LifeCycle is buggging, and it's happening very oftenly), you will have to use the very slow ISO from DELL (http://goo.gl/GSuiWp) DELL RAID controller (AVOID them !!!) - Replace them by ARECA for example that support officialy FreeBSD DELL support (they have no idea what is FreeBSD, so ...


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OK the damn thing is now working. I suspect that taking the battery out, spending 10 minutes looking for where I put my meter (curtesy of recently re-arranging my office to be a lot neater), and measuring the battery to see that it was good gave the server enough time to reset whatever was locking up the power on circuitry.


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Buy sliding rails or simply place your equipment on a sliding shelf.


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Short answer: It depends. Long answer: This is going to vary a lot from one chassis/enclosure to the next or even from one sub-model of enclosure to the next. Questions you need to consider: Are the rails designed to hold the weight of the chassis while fully extended? Does the chassis extend far enough so that any other equipment in the rack will not ...


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Rail kits tend to be specific to the type of enclosure you're getting, since while the holes on the rack mounting post are standardized, the method of fastening rails to the case is not. What you may find are L-shaped brackets that a server may rest on, but those are not able to support the server while slid out. Depending on your application this may or ...


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"I'm not sure if a server I own has been setup on RAID or not." Easy calculation Assume that you server got 4 HDD Each HDD 100GB 4X100 = 288GB 400 - 30% Raid 5 = 370GB



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