Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

Just cleanly partition the new disk to any size you like and copy the data over with Carbon Copy Cloner. It will be bootable and have the size you want. You can do that on a running system, and don't need any live cd's or anything, just an usb or firewire interface for the new/second harddisk.


4

You are correct - FAT32 and it's limitations (to do with file size and character limits) will be your biggest constraint. For reference (so as to have the information all in one place): | TYPE | FILE SIZE | FILENAME | CHARACTER SET | DIRECTORY | VOLUME SIZE | | FAT32 | ~4GB | 11/255(2)|ASCII/Unicode(2)| No (3) | 2TB (1) | | NTFS | ~16 ...


4

Depends on the value of the data. If the data is of low value go with tools such as ddrescue, then export the image back to another mac. If the data is valuable you should send the disk to a rescue company without trying to read out the data yourself. Additional operations on a failing hd can kill it permanently, which will significantly increase the cost ...


3

I haven't used it, but iPartition claims to be able to convert in-place between case-sentitive and case-insensitive HFS+ formats.


3

From Linux you can use ddrescue.


2

It seems the only 100% reliable way is to disable journalling in OSX, hfsplus-tools doesn't have the ability to disable it without reformatting.


2

Personally, I think the best solution would be for you to setup a Virtual machine, using whatever you favorite VM tool is, that is as near to identical to your production environment as possible. Same OS, same packages, same configuration and so on. You are bound to run into other issues as well like slight differences in php, difference in available ...


2

I have written a small python script to remove all characters from filenames that makes handling them under *nix difficult. Perhaps this can help you as well. #! /usr/bin/python # -*- coding: UTF-8 -*- """ usage: fixFileNames.py FILE... Renames FILEs to sensible names, avoiding collision. """ import sys import os from string import maketrans def ...


2

Converting in place is (as far as I know) not possible if HFS+ is involved. Besides, this sort of thing should never be done without a proper backup of the data. So copying the data to another medium is sort of mandatory anyway to make the backup. I run into a similar sort of scenario regularly when needing to resize partitions on encrypted drives. The ...


1

Unless you get an answer from someone who has tried this before, a quick bit of Googling seems to suggest that you're playing with fire. While this question on SuperUser suggests that more recent versions of rsync support resource forks, I see no such mention in any of the upstream changelogs. It may be specific to the OS X version of rsync. Tread very ...


1

Neither of those includes a target that I can see, so I'm not sure what you intend them to apply to. The chmod manpage makes it pretty clear that -R applies things recursively, otherwise they apply to the named objects and nothing else.


1

I believe BackupPCs implementation of the rsync protocol would not support ACLs and extended attributes anyway, so any kind of metadata stored there cannot be backed up effectively. This way, the problem of storing it does not even arise. Apparently, the rsync patches for MacOSX do contain some functionality to convert metadata [...] on the sender into an ...


1

I guess that degradation you mention is caused by the filesystem and not the storage device. In that case, any block device (single disks, RAIDs, whatever) would behave similarly. The only exception that comes to my mind is SDDs; on one hand, the lack of significant seek times would make irrelevant the level of fragmentation and non-locality that plague ...


1

use testdisk with linux. It will allow you to search for lost/corrupted/overwritten partition(s) (tables) and restore/recover them (and or their data) and even lets you dump raw data from ntfs formatted diskspace.


1

Don't know about UDIF, but HFS+ does support transparent compression. There is an opensource tool called afsctool that will be able to convert your files into compressed state. Not sure whether the tool will work on Linux, as I think it uses build-in Mac OS X api.


1

You can format your development volume to be HFS case sensitive which will force the behavior you wish. Downside of this is some poorly written OS X applications won't work because developers have made the same mistake you have and mis-capitalized paths.


1

I had a similar issue even after decompressing the DMG to a normal disk image. Turned out the issue was because my DMG was a Hybrid (FAT+HFS) image and wasnt correctly recognised by the HFS driver. Check out the following link for a way to do it [ http://www.64lines.com/mounting-hfs-plus ]


1

Not convinced this is going to help all that much, but based on the source of the driver for HFS, it looks like it's struggling to find the b-tree detailed in that technical note. Unfortunately I don't have such a file to even experiment with. 372 HFSPLUS_SB(sb).cat_tree = hfs_btree_open(sb, HFSPLUS_CAT_CNID); 373 if ...


1

I think there is a GUI way of doing this with Disk Utility but I can't remember off the top of my head. Anyway you should be able to resize a hfs+ volume nondestructively from the command line. The article is kind of old but the syntax haven't changed so it should still be the same. Standard warning like you should have a backup and don't try to resize the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible