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2

If a host fails it will still be part of the cluster, just not available - so the percentage available equation will not change. It would only change if you removed the host from the cluster configuration. To really get into HA cluster sizing and host failover capacity you need to have a solid handle on slot sizes and reservations used in the environment. ...


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I was able to resolve this by adding the following to the vrrp_instance VI_1 block. vrrp_unicast_bind 192.168.1.11 # Internal IP of this machine vrrp_unicast_peer 192.168.1.12 # Internal IP of peer It appears that originally that the heartbeat was going out over unicast and being picked up by the other instances. By defining the peer(s) of the machine ...


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fail_timeout from the NGINX documentation: Sets: the time during which the specified number of unsuccessful attempts to communicate with the server should happen to consider the server unavailable; and the period of time the server will be considered unavailable. So a setting of 5 would mean 10 seconds total (5 timing out, 5 waiting before contacting ...


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If you an attach enough local storage you can build your own iSCSI HA-solution. Reiceipe: - drbd > 8.2.x - tgtd Set up two local VMs that replicate two LVs onto each other in drbd dual primary mode. Use each local iscsi target. In XEN-server make sure to use eacch target in active/passive mode (no rr!).


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When choosing an HA solution, you'll need to decide what level of downtime (if any) is acceptable. This will affect the complexity of your setup. I think you have two options without purchasing additional equipment (with further permutations): "Always up" - DRBD in Primary-Primary 5-15 minutes of downtime - DRBD in Primary-Slave mode For the highest ...


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Of cause there is, that's what those services are doing as well. :-) It depends a bit how you're currently redirecting/distributing your users globally. Assuming that the results is effectively that some users are redirected from www.example.com to www.eu.example.com and others to www.oc.example.com respectively www.am.example.com. You could use your ...


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None. Your approach is broken. You seem to be under the delusion that you can change the DNS like that. It does not work like this. Even if you set the TTL low, some providers will ignore it - and your old value will still be used. You effectively have no control over DNS expiration outside "within a day or two". Any high availability based on DNS changes ...


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In many cases a lot of newer companies are using clusters of cheaper servers instead of just one or two "big" servers to alleviate the costs. If your application supports clustering it can also give you an easy way to double or triple your capacity by just spinning up more instances of the server. Many people use Amazon in exactly this manner because it is ...


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check: ITIL - Capacity Planning In terms of your specific questions: "Are 4 8GB servers behind the load balancer better than 2 16GB servers?" it really depends on your architecture, design, other services (monitoring, config. mng. logging etc), etc.



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