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21

I use NFS for my home directories in our production environment. There are a couple of tricks. Don't NFS mount to /home - that way you can have a local user that allows you in in the event that the NFS server goes down. We mount to /mnt/nfs/home Use soft mounts and a very short timeout - this will prevent processes from blocking forever. Use the ...


18

SSH can't do that because SSH protocol does not include the requested hostname in the call. (HTTP is one of the few protocols that does include the requested hostname, which is how it can be used for virtual hosting.) There are a couple of other things you might try instead: You could create separate users for each subdomain, but with the same UID as the ...


14

FreeIPA is probably what you're looking for. It's to Linux what Active Directory is to Windows. (It can also talk to AD if you have a heterogeneous environment, but shouldn't be used to manage Windows machines directly. Use AD for that.) Red Hat's documentation (they call it Identity Management) is very thorough and easy to follow, and should be mostly ...


14

The "Folder Redirection" feature of Group Policy will help you a lot. It'll work on both your Windows XP and Windows 7 machines and will get the users' "My Documents" out of their local hard disk drives and onto a server computer (or NAS device, if you like-- it doesn't have to be a Windows Server machine but it does need to be accessible from the clients ...


11

For individual folders (My Docyuments, My Pictures, etc., the "Special Folders") I do the registry/GPO thing you alluded to. However, if I want to move the entire folder structure I cheat. Move the folder to a new location, and then create a junction pointing the old folder to the new folder. So all your programs will still think the folder is ...


9

I've run something like this in the past. LDAP is your best bet for centralized accounts. This is reasonably standard, and should be easy to set up. The client is merely a matter of installing a few packages (ldap-utils, libnss-ldap, and libpam-ldap), and editing /etc/pam.d/common-(everything). You'll need to add a line like <type of file goes here> ...


9

According to Chapter 3 of the FHS (Filesystem Hierarchy Standard) 2.3, data for services provided by a server should go under /srv, but leaves the organization under it pretty much in charge of each specific system. I would recommend /srv/www/<domain> or if the server is providing multiple services per domain something like ...


9

This is NOT possible because SSH protocol does not send the requested hostname anywhere in the packets. My idea on implementing this would be to use something like OpenVZ to isolate the subdomains and have a separate IP for each subdomain.


8

This is what I have in my favourites for reference: http://blogs.technet.com/b/migreene/archive/2008/03/24/3019467.aspx CREATOR OWNER - Full Control (Apply onto: Subfolders and Files Only) System - Full Control (Apply onto: This Folder, Subfolders and Files) Domain Admins - Full Control (Apply onto: This Folder, Subfolders and Files) Everyone - Create ...


8

Most common solutions are NIS+NFS or LDAP+NFS. NIS is easier to set up than LDAP, but LDAP supports multiple OSes and is more flexible in that sense. I would recommend using one of these two since both are well documented and established in the industry.


8

I've spent a long time researching this and finally managed to do it on my own machine. There are two scenarios here: a new install, and a machine that is already installed/used. For a new install, you can (apparently) modify the autounattend.xml file (unresearched link here, no guarantees, I haven't tried) For a machine that is already installed, there ...


7

chrooting users using ssh is not a desirable configuration in most cases. When they're jailed into their home dir, they won't be able to use any programs outside their home dir. This makes unix almost unusable as a shell server. You can use FTPS instead of SFTP/SCP, which will send passwords over SSL, but uses an ssh server, allowing you to chroot them for ...


7

Red Hat and Debian use /var/www. If I was accessing an unfamiliar server, that is the first place I would look for a web server's document root.


7

Just create a home directory for them and grant them permissions. mkdir /home/$user and then chown $user:$user /home/$user. Take note to replace the group in the chown command with something else if required.


7

Assuming all the users are local users (that is, there's no network directory service like LDAP, Active Directory, NIS, etc), then local users are probably all enumerated in /etc/passwd, which is a colon delimited file with the following fields: username:password:uid:gid:name:home directory:shell You can get just the usernames and home directories, if ...


6

If you mean applications using OpenSSL library for SSL, each application can either specify the (concatenated) file and/or (hash-linked) directory to be used for trusted certs, or it can invoke OpenSSL's defaults, or it could offer the choice. In the first case, you need to (be able and) configure the app what to specify. For example, in curl use --cacert ...


6

I would suggest a good local consultant to assess the particulars of your situation... Really. There may be other business requirements or nuances that people on this forum may not recognize or be invested-enough to consider. A dedicated resource is your best bet... Otherwise, we're just throwing product recommendations at you for something that's easily ...


6

Make sure Apache has +x (execute) permissions on all parent directories: /, /home, /home/pedro and so on. If standard Unix permissions are used (i.e. no ACLs), this command will help: namei -l /home/pedro/dev/k2tv/gerenciador_eventos


6

It doesn't "delete on reboot"; it only exists in RAM in the first place. Mount tmpfs to a directory under your home directory.


6

du -hcs /home/*/ Or, for exactly what you want: for i in /home/*/; do user=${i#/*/} space=$(du -hs "$i" | cut -f1) echo "${user%/} = $space" done


5

Assuming you're running this on Windows Server 2003 or newer you'll have both the TAKEOWN and ICACLS commands. I'm also assuming the that top level folder permission is set sanely (i.e. "Authenticated Users - List Folder Contents - This folder only", proper "Administrator" permissions if you like them being able to get into user folders, etc). @echo off FOR ...


5

http://www.howtoforge.com recently posted an article on using GlusterFS as a NFS replacement/alternative, you may want to check it out. http://www.howtoforge.com/creating-an-nfs-like-standalone-storage-server-with-glusterfs-on-debian-lenny Here is a short description of why its a good 'feasible' alternative to NFS, from the GlusterFS project page ...


5

This might be the intended behavior. The manual page shows an --env option for start-stop-daemon: -e|--env env-name Set an environment variable whose name and value is env-name before starting executable. Example: -e HOME="/home/user" exports an environment variable whose name is HOME with value ...


5

This guide is pretty major surgery, only follow it if you are confident at the command line - a few mistakes could lead to losing all your data. You will have to copy all the files from your home directory somewhere else, and then copy them back once you have turned off the encryption, but you don't have to reinstall. So let's say you have an external drive ...


5

There are two common ways of dealing with a mixture of local and centralized accounts (be it LDAP or NIS or whatever). Your third update covers one of them. Local accounts use a non-/home base directory for homes LDAP/central use a non-/home base directory for homes I commonly use option #1 and create /local then setup my local accounts to have home ...


5

Unless something drastic has changed in 2012, the following should work. Set the share on the server (in your case UserData$) with Full Control for the Admins/Domain Admins, and Everyone as "Change and Read". On the NTFS folder "UserData" set the permissions explicit without inheritance and only grant Domain Admins Full control, along with anyone outside ...


5

This is normal behaviour. Most of the FTP Server lock the user to their respective home directory to prevent access to other filesystem files. This is called "chroot", because you change the root directory of the this process. In vsftp for example you can disable it by editing the configuration file /etc/vsftpd/vsftpd.conf and change this value to no: ...


4

There was an old csccmd.exe utility in Windows XP that had functionality to do what you're looking for but it doesn't work with the new Offline Files (CSC) in Windows Vista and 7. In Vista and Windows 7 Offline Files has a WMI API that can be used to manipulate the configuration in an automated fashion. I haven't used it but I strongly suspect this API will ...


4

It's documented here: https://blogs.technet.com/b/askds/archive/2008/06/30/automatic-creation-of-user-folders-for-home-roaming-profile-and-redirected-folders.aspx Administrators: Full Control System: Full Control Creator Owner: Full Control Authenticated Users: Read & Execute, List Folder Contents, Read And you must further edit the ACE ...


4

You can and should restore it from backup.



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