Hot answers tagged

33

In the SATA specification this is referred to as hot plug and hot removal and they are two separate events. While the electrical and communication layers support both hot plug and hot removal, check that your drive controller, operating system, and drivers support them. Note that all of the below ONLY applies to host and devices (ie, drive controllers and ...


20

It depends on your controller. If it supports hot-swap, then yes. If not, then you might blow the controller and kill the whole array. If you do take a drive out of the array (either while running or powered off) you will have a full rebuild to do once you put it back in which will take a while and degrade performance while it happens. Testing your RAID ...


10

Hot-swap is more a function of the drive-controller than the drive itself. Doing it requires some procedures to be followed by the controller that are more expensive to implement than a simple controller. Some RAID controllers turn off the disk-cache and rely on on-controller cache to satisfy the same need, as this ensures that when the data gets sent to a ...


9

When a drive has failed in some circumstances Linux won't realise you've actually pulled it physically from the array. If you have that problem (as I did this morning) you can do the following: echo 1 > /sys/block/<devnode>/device/delete E.g. in my case /dev/sda had failed and I didn't want to reboot the server, so I did: echo 1 > /sys/block/...


9

Grrrr... I hate Supermicro... and white box servers in general - There's no consistency in model numbers or parts. If HP, IBM, Dell, etc., we would be able to look at your server model number and say, "yes, this supports feature X". For you, this is going to depend on the controller inside the server, as well as how the SAS backplane is connected. Please ...


8

The drive has to be able to survive not only being removed without a proper shutdown procedure, but being put into a machine while the power is on and spinning itself up correctly without any instructions from the server. That and you'll pay it, so why not charge a butt load more. Wait until you look at the costs for Enterprise SAN drive. You think hot ...


8

Yes, in this case, you would pull the bad drive and insert the new drive. HP Smart Array controllers initiate the rebuild process automatically. This can be done hot, while the system is running. A description of the HP Smart Array RAID controller technology is available here.


7

Using those drives there is a 'lever' on the front of them that should be in the 'open' position when inserting the drives, when it gets back far enough, you can start to close the lever and it actually locks them in place. These drives if configured correctly and in certain types of raids can be removed while the machine is powered on and rebuild themselves....


7

Well, according to a simple search that server should have "Hot-plug 2.5" SAS" drives, so if that's the case, yes you should be able to pull drives out and put drives in while the machine is live. However, you need to double check your actual setup. This is something that you should do not only to impress your boss, but more importantly, to demonstrate to ...


7

Normaly any SATA I/II you can found in the markey will fit in. Check you NAS documentation to see if there some limitation about it. Hope this help.


7

ESXi doesn't support hot-removing memory or CPUs from a VM. Someone I met in the pub a couple of months ago told me that the sister of a friend of his cousin *cough* got the answer that virtually no customer demands this feature. In other words: It doesn't pay to bother implementing hot-remove. If you want ESXi to support this, go to VMware and tell them. ...


6

Yes, they're hot-swappable... The drives are usually compatible and the hot-swap ability is built into the SAS specification. The SFF-8482 connector on the drives is a standard and there's nothing physically unique to Dell drives versus the OEM. I'd still prefer to use the manufacturer drive part number before going OEM, though. If you dig a bit harder (...


5

The server you selected is capable of maintaining a RAID1 with 2 disks+another hot spare if you so desire (you do). When it comes to backup you have a few options- NTBackup (Here's a link on how to do it with USB drives) downside-it will run on a schedule-it won't auto run when it detects your backup disk. So you'll have to make sure the disk is plugged ...


5

They charge this b/c they can. People who are worried about hot swapping tend to have a business need/reason behind that. Either from a risk or cost point of view but in many cases it's both. Say it's 9am and a drive in a RAID 1 running the companies email server dies. Do you shut it down and replace the drive which now leaves 200 employee unable to ...


5

It is running RAID5 or 6 (dont remember) You might want to confirm that before you go any further. Now, can I just buy a new harddrive and take the faulty out and put the new in while the server is running, and will it automaticlly rebuild? No need for entering the RAID configuration? Use the Array Configuration Utility to look at the array ...


5

In theory, the standard says that SAS handles hot swap gracefully. In practice... well, you're taking a bit of a chance. Dell will kick up a royal stink if there's even the slightest chance you might have used a non-Dell drive in the machine (we're having terrible troubles with them at the moment -- they suggested that because the machine had previously ...


5

This... doesn't really make any sense. IP addressing has nothing at all to do with domain membership. If you are replacing a machine with a new one, the new one will not automatically be a domain member just because it has the same IP address (or name) of the old one; you'll need to join it to the domain, using the standard procedure (change the domain ...


5

Assuming the power supplies support both voltages, then it will not be a problem. The PSUs output the same DC voltage either way.


5

You can, but you probably shouldn't. Can you try it with a less important server? Also, the make/model of the system may make a difference. Edit: I'm shifting a rack from 110V to 208V and decided to give this a try. It seems to work on my HP ProLiant servers without issue.


5

No! This is not a sane approach. At all. Taking out a disk out of a RAID array is no replacement for a proper backup. Among other things, you needlessly put yourself to the risk of a failed recovery due to a bad "primary" disk.


4

I can't believe nobody mentioned AHCI yet... your SATA controller has to be in AHCI mode to enable hot swap. Check this by looking at the driver you are using: root@peter:~ # find /sys -name sdk /sys/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:11.0/ata5/host4/target4:0:0/4:0:0:0/block /sdk /sys/block/sdk /sys/class/block/sdk root@peter:~ # readlink /sys/devices/pci0000:...


4

Yep that is exactly what hot swapping is all about. You can pull the disk at any time without having to turn off the server.


4

Yes, if they are hot swappable you can just pull one of the disk and things should keep working.That is how you would replace a failed disk.


4

You can hot-swap any drive that the MD3000i supports. It's the controller that allows hot swapping, not the disks.


4

Unspared for sure. That mirror is at risk, where the mirror that is rebuilt with the hot spare is redundant.


4

Adapters are available to convert from a molex power connector to the SATA connector, with the caveat that the molex connectors don't have the 3.3 volt feed that's technically part of the SATA power spec. I haven't personally run across any drives that actually need the 3.3V connection, but you'll want to check with your specific drives.


4

The feature term you are looking for is "Online Capacity Extension". Dell SAS iR controllers do not support it, the PERC and CERC controllers do. So with the iR controller, you would have to insert your two new disks, create a new large container and copy the data over from the old one. Also, I'm assuming that I can get any 3.5" SATA (or SATA II) drive ...



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