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19

It depends on your controller. If it supports hot-swap the yes. If not then you might blow the controller and kill the whole array. If you do take a drive out of the array (either while running or powered off) you will have a full re-build to do once you put it back in which will take a while and degrade performance while it happens. Testing your RAID ...


10

Hot-swap is more a function of the drive-controller than the drive itself. Doing it requires some procedures to be followed by the controller that are more expensive to implement than a simple controller. Some RAID controllers turn off the disk-cache and rely on on-controller cache to satisfy the same need, as this ensures that when the data gets sent to a ...


8

The drive has to be able to survive not only being removed without a proper shutdown procedure, but being put into a machine while the power is on and spinning itself up correctly without any instructions from the server. That and you'll pay it, so why not charge a butt load more. Wait until you look at the costs for Enterprise SAN drive. You think hot ...


8

Yes, in this case, you would pull the bad drive and insert the new drive. HP Smart Array controllers initiate the rebuild process automatically. This can be done hot, while the system is running. A description of the HP Smart Array RAID controller technology is available here.


7

Normaly any SATA I/II you can found in the markey will fit in. Check you NAS documentation to see if there some limitation about it. Hope this help.


7

Using those drives there is a 'lever' on the front of them that should be in the 'open' position when inserting the drives, when it gets back far enough, you can start to close the lever and it actually locks them in place. These drives if configured correctly and in certain types of raids can be removed while the machine is powered on and rebuild ...


6

Well, according to a simple search that server should have "Hot-plug 2.5" SAS" drives, so if that's the case, yes you should be able to pull drives out and put drives in while the machine is live. However, you need to double check your actual setup. This is something that you should do not only to impress your boss, but more importantly, to demonstrate to ...


6

Yes, they're hot-swappable... The drives are usually compatible and the hot-swap ability is built into the SAS specification. The SFF-8482 connector on the drives is a standard and there's nothing physically unique to Dell drives versus the OEM. I'd still prefer to use the manufacturer drive part number before going OEM, though. If you dig a bit harder ...


5

It is running RAID5 or 6 (dont remember) You might want to confirm that before you go any further. Now, can I just buy a new harddrive and take the faulty out and put the new in while the server is running, and will it automaticlly rebuild? No need for entering the RAID configuration? Use the Array Configuration Utility to look at the array ...


5

In theory, the standard says that SAS handles hot swap gracefully. In practice... well, you're taking a bit of a chance. Dell will kick up a royal stink if there's even the slightest chance you might have used a non-Dell drive in the machine (we're having terrible troubles with them at the moment -- they suggested that because the machine had previously ...


5

The server you selected is capable of maintaining a RAID1 with 2 disks+another hot spare if you so desire (you do). When it comes to backup you have a few options- NTBackup (Here's a link on how to do it with USB drives) downside-it will run on a schedule-it won't auto run when it detects your backup disk. So you'll have to make sure the disk is plugged ...


5

They charge this b/c they can. People who are worried about hot swapping tend to have a business need/reason behind that. Either from a risk or cost point of view but in many cases it's both. Say it's 9am and a drive in a RAID 1 running the companies email server dies. Do you shut it down and replace the drive which now leaves 200 employee unable to ...


4

You can hot-swap any drive that the MD3000i supports. It's the controller that allows hot swapping, not the disks.


4

Yep that is exactly what hot swapping is all about. You can pull the disk at any time without having to turn off the server.


4

Yes, if they are hot swappable you can just pull one of the disk and things should keep working.That is how you would replace a failed disk.


4

The feature term you are looking for is "Online Capacity Extension". Dell SAS iR controllers do not support it, the PERC and CERC controllers do. So with the iR controller, you would have to insert your two new disks, create a new large container and copy the data over from the old one. Also, I'm assuming that I can get any 3.5" SATA (or SATA II) drive ...


4

You can buy branded drives from HP and Dell that match the part numbers of your existing disks. If you have bare drives without a "drive caddy" (aka: drive tray, sled, or carrier), you can buy the requisite caddies from HP/Dell parts suppliers or eBay. As for 3G and 6G disks, you'll pretty much only find 6G SAS drives in the new market because they're ...


4

Unspared for sure. That mirror is at risk, where the mirror that is rebuilt with the hot spare is redundant.


4

Adapters are available to convert from a molex power connector to the SATA connector, with the caveat that the molex connectors don't have the 3.3 volt feed that's technically part of the SATA power spec. I haven't personally run across any drives that actually need the 3.3V connection, but you'll want to check with your specific drives.


4

Set autoreplace=on for your pool and use like or similar disks. Resilvering occurs automatically when that flag is set on the pool. If a hot-spare is defined in the pool, it will also rebuild automatically if autoreplace is on. There's nothing more to really consider.


4

That functionality needs to be supported both by the hardware platform, and by the OS. In your case, the HP Proliant DL385 g7 manual clearly states that a full power off is needed to install new memory modules, and as such I wouldn't even care to check for ESXI support to the functionality.


4

Page 50 of the manual says this: Installing DIMMs CAUTION: For proper cooling do not operate the server without the access panel, baffles, expansion slot covers, or blanks installed. If the server supports hot-plug components, minimize the amount of time the access panel is open. Power down the server (on page 22). Extend the server ...


3

You need to first initiate devfsadm cleanup subroutines. # devfsadm -C -c disk -v Then, configure and create device path # devfsadm -c disk -v If that is unsuccessful, then... Remove the disk. # cfgadm -c unconfigure sata0/5::dsk/c2t5d0 Initiate devfsadm cleanup subroutines. # devfsadm -C -c disk -v Verify the disk has been removed. # cfgadm ...


3

Intentionally degrading your array because you don't want to take a proper backup is a bad idea. I would never consider this as a valid option. If you don't want to back up to tape (a lot of people don't) then, at least do disk-to-disk backups where the disks are in a separate server. A backup that is stored on the same server being backed up is no backup at ...


3

Consider using a purpose-built internal or external RDX backup drive system for this. RDX consists of ruggedized SATA disks in cartridge form and is intended specifically for hot-swap and backup purposes. The drive is inexpensive and you can purchase "cartridges" or disks separately, as you need them. If not, an external USB3 disk and backup software go ...


3

Try the devfsadm command devfsadm -c disk The default operation is to attempt to load every driver in the system and attach to all possible device instances. Next, devfsadm creates logical links to device nodes in /dev and /devices and loads the device policy.


3

Server 2008 writes a GUID to each drive and remembers the settings for that drive. If you assign them all the same letter, then they'll keep that letter. When you put a new drive in and format it, it might get a different letter, depends on your exact configuration (though this shouldn't really be a problem, as you can just change the letter).


3

Short answer is no. A 1950 with 4 drives? Are you sure it isn't a 2950? The drives will not be able to sync up. At best you would get terrible performance and at worst it will just fail to accept the drive. Hot swap is just as safe as shutting down.



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