Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

You probably won't really see much gains in network performance. What you do get is A place where you can block annoying sites you can integrate clamav to help block malware before it gets to your windows systems. You can watch the access logs and see what computers are doing what. And possibly see requests from systems that where infected by malware. ...


7

I used LightSquid: http://lightsquid.sourceforge.net/ It was good enough for me for several reasons: It is fast, takes very little diskspace (In comparison with SARG, only ~45Kb of Perl scripts) There is nothing superfluous You can try it, using online-demo: http://lightsquid.sourceforge.net/demo17/index.cgi?year=2005&month=04 "Official" ...


7

You can do this only in very specific and specialised circumstances. The problem is that the URLs visited, and exactly what went on in them, in an HTTPS connection is all protected by SSL. In order to look inside, you've got to break through that protection. The only way to do that (short of becoming wildly famous by breaking a crypto algorithm or two) is ...


4

Privoxy is a "non-caching web proxy with advanced filtering capabilities". But... What is wrong with using multiple processes? Due to the nature of how processes/threads are created on Linux (and some unixes) there's not much difference between a software that uses many children processes or threads... If your concern is resource usage, you can tune ...


4

Nginx doesn't support forward proxy requests (the HTTP CONNECT method), which is why you get the "Bad request" response from Nginx. Proxytunnel is able to connect to Nginx, but from there it stops. AFAIF the Nginx authors have no plans to support forward proxy requests, as they like to be specialized in serving HTTP really well. Apache has modules for ...


3

Not yet but it may get support http://www.varnish-cache.org/trac/wiki/PostTwoShoppingList#a31.UseUNIXsocketsforbackend


3

Considering that your nick is "IAmAN00B" I'll start from the beginning. Pretend in your mind that each virtual machine is in fact a separate computer sitting on your desk. Instead of say, one computer with three VMs, imagine that it's four computers sitting side by side. The computer on the left can't control what the computer on the right does. Now stop ...


3

Calamaris might provide what you're looking for. Handles many different types of logs, including squid.


2

As a possible Rube Goldberg workaround, can't squid be configured to use a proxy itself? If so, and you want the various smart features of proxychains, you could run some other no-op proxy that works under proxychains. Maybe even an earlier version of squid installed in an alternate path and configured to do nothing: squid-3.1 --> squid-3.0-noop --> ...


2

Without patching the kernel or the netstat binary, I don't think you can. This is something rootkits and viruses would really like to do. (Yes, there might be some ways, but they will probably involve writing a network driver or something.)


2

Create a setenv.sh (or setenv.bat if running windows), if you don't already have one, and add the following java options: JAVA_OPTS="-Dhttp.proxySet=true -Dhttp.proxyHost=<proxy_hostname> -Dhttp.proxyPort=<port_number> -Dhttp.nonProxyHosts=<domain_one>|<domain two> $JAVA_OPTS" This should work nicely.


2

No need of setting proxy in RouterOS. You can route all outgoing HTTP traffic to the server directly thru NAT: ip firewall nat add in-interface=eth1 src-address=!<IP of Squid machine> dst-port=80 protocol=tcp action=dst-nat to-addresses=<IP of Squid machine> to-ports=8080 The last parameter "src-address=!..." is needed in case which squid ...


2

Let's say you have two proxies: ________ _________ _________ __________ | client | --> | proxy B | --> | proxy A | --> { internet } |________| |_________| |_________| {__________} port port 8000 8080 Your configuration for proxy A already works so we'll ignore that for now. ...


2

Not a technical problem but a people and policies problem. Prove that you need the access or that it improves efficiency (lots of studies available) and get the policy changed instead. Using technology to circumvent policies should be a last resort where political censorship is in effect or so called human rights are ignored - and in a corporate setting one ...


2

I'm not sure why enforcing compliance with robots.txt would be the job of a proxy: The crawler (robot) is supposed to pull robots.txt and follow the instructions contained in that file, so as long as the proxy returns the correct robots.txt data and the crawler Does The Right Thing with that data, and as long as the crawler supports using a proxy, you'll get ...


2

You can configure the server to push only certain routes to its clients. For example, in order to force only traffic to 10.10.10.10 through the VPN, add the following to your server's configuration: push "route 10.10.10.10 255.255.255.255" Of course, for this to work, the redirection of the default gateway needs to be switched off. To do this, remove any ...


2

You have and extra dot on one of the ranges: export no_proxy="localhost,127.0.0.0/8,172.16.0.0/12,192.168.0.0/16" EDIT: After searching, it seems no_proxy won't work with networks, only domains .sample.com or exact IP 192.168.1.2, so either you add your local domain, all the IP your network has, or you use flags like wget --no-proxy


1

There's a known vulnerability that makes Facebook susceptible to cross-site scripting attacks. It's possible that something like this is going on. Here's a write-up of it.


1

You can do this with ngrep. ngrep -q -W byline "Text I'm interested in" port 80 > ~/my_log.txt


1

Can you skip the proxy, and just use tcpdump with the -A option and a filter? # capture everything destined for port 80 tcpdump -qni eth0 -s 0 -A port 80 # capture everything destined for port 80 on 192.168.32.1 tcpdump -qni eth0 -s 0 -A port 80 and host 192.168.32.1 # capture everything destined for port 80 and display only the interesting bit. tcpdump ...


1

Basic Authentication normally is a Base64 Encoded String of "username:password" and a HTTP-Header "Authorization". By adding the following to a Apache2 vHost you should be fine: <Location /path> RequestHeader set Authorization "Basic <base64string>" </Location> ProxyPass /path http://backend/path ProxyPassReverse /path ...


1

On one proxy (the client side), you need to define the cache_peer. On the other proxy (the server side), you need to define the appropriate acl line to allow the proxy IP to use this proxy.


1

If you can get OpenSSH onto your workstation computer (say, with Cygwin's openssh package), you can use a proxy helper named corkscrew to enable the OpenSSH client to tunnel out through the proxy. Cygwin has a corkscrew package, so it's convenient to use if you already have Cygwin installed. Read the corkscrew man page for instructions on its configuration ...


1

HTTP CONNECT is intended for tunnelling and is not required. Blocking CONNECT has no impact on normal sites which generally handle GET, HEAD, and POST requests. Blocking of this sort would assume deep inspection of packets. A web proxy might be a more appropriate tool for this than a firewall. HTTPS will not be blocked by blocking CONNECT. The ...


1

It can be done with the parent-proxy setting: /ip proxy set parent-proxy=<IP of Squid machine> parent-proxy-port=3128


1

Using the Single Network Adapter template means that the Internal network is defined as 0-126.255.255.255, and 128-255.255.255.255. Yep, that means that any non-localhost address is considered internal. This semi-nerfs the ISA Firewall features in favour of getting it to do Web Proxy stuff. Once you've got a Single Network Adapter configuration ...


1

In terms of a port-forwarder, I'd probably employ socat for this, to use your example variables, it'd look something like: socat tcp-listen:4545,fork,reuseaddr proxy:PROXYSRV:DESTSRV:DESTPRT,proxyport=PROXYPRT And man socat would of course fill in any details I've forgotten.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible