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15

There are only few guidelines in the relevant section 9 of the specification: There should not be multiple connections from the browser to the same server Connections should not be closed "until it is determined that no further communication with a server is necessary", i.e. when the tab is closed and no other tabs have communication to the server The ...


6

Benchmarks are lies, don't reflect the reality but might be a useful tool to detect bottlenecks. But you have to understand the benchmarks. Given that you omit essential details needed to understand the benchmark results it might be that you don't really understand what might affect the results of the benchmark. Especially information about the size of the ...


4

Yes, try a web-log analyzer, here's a list to start with


3

Stick with using vhosts and let apache determine which site to serve via the headers. Using a port other than 80 and assuming the client will figure it out from the SRV records will not work. All modern browsers support this approach, and newer versions of apache and web browsers even support this using TLS, in case you do eventually decide to switch to ...


3

Top tells your your system isn't doing anything, as it is 100% idle. The fields have the following meaning and don't specify specific cores. us, user : time running un-niced user processes sy, system : time running kernel processes ni, nice : time running niced user processes wa, IO-wait : time waiting for I/O ...


2

To test whether Nginx is listening on port 80, on the same server, you can run: sudo netstat -nlp | grep nginx You should get back a result matching Nginx, reporting it listening on port 80. If that works, the next test is to access Nginx from inside the server via HTTP: curl http://127.0.0.1 If that works, the issue is a firewall or other networking ...


2

Yes, if the proxy-server adds a HTTP header X-Forwarded-For, most of them do. Proxy can also add several other headers, depends of the actual software.


2

Ok , if want http to https then please install self sing certificate


2

This answer depends on having PowerShell 3.0 to use the Invoke-WebRequest cmdlet instead of wget. It can be downloaded from here You could achieve this without creating a file to run this from in the first place. I imagine you're remotely triggering this task somehow, in which case you can do the following: powershell.exe -Command "& {Invoke-WebRequest ...


1

You already have a running program listening on port 8080, as evidenced by your netstat output. You seem to indicate that it is Apache. You will need to reconfigure Apache so that it does not listen on port 8080, or choose a different port on which to run your Go program.


1

You can have different server software handle the same port number of different subdomains, if the subdomains have different IP addresses only. In the end, the web browser connects to the IP address and port number, not to the domain name. So if the IP address and port number is the same for different (sub)domains, the operating system on the target server ...


1

Nope. Redirecting port 443 to 80 on firewall will just redirect it. Clients will expect that something SSL-enabled will be answering, and they will get plain HTTP answer instead. This will lead to an error (for example, ssl_error_rx_record_too_long). Thing you are referring to is called SSL Offloading. It's when something (basically a HTTPS-enabled web ...


1

This is one of the scenarios Nginx explicitely supports, and you would most likely see at least some performance gains due to the improved pipelining, having only a single TLS session to negotiate, etc... assuming your application's architecture is such that it would profit from those benefits. However, beware that some of the oft-used HTTP 1.1 hacks you ...


1

You can add this code in .htaccess file <IfModule mod_rewrite.c> RewriteEngine on RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^tset.com/tset$ [NC] RewriteRule ^/?$ "https://test.com/test" [R=301,L] </IfModule>


1

As per the comments, if you want to catch traffic on HTTPS, you must define a server block which serves up the right SSL certificates for the domains in question. SSL negotiation takes place before you can send a redirect to the browser, and if nginx can't provide a valid certificate for the domain there will be errors. You only need a single server block ...


1

Classic SSL setups involved required having a unique IP address for every SSL certificate. You haven't mentioned if is what you are doing or not. If this is the case, then simply point one IP at the temporary VPS won't be sufficient to make the SSL sites appear-- all the IP addresses for the SSL site will need to be pointed there as well. More recently, ...


1

My take: the openssl s_client's manual states: -nextprotoneg protocols enable Next Protocol Negotiation TLS extension and provide a list of comma- separated protocol names that the client should advertise support for. The list should contain most wanted protocols first. Protocol names are printable ASCII strings, for example "http/1.1" or ...


1

AWS public IPs are NATted to the instances. Hence you only see the private IP for eth0. You need to configure a security group to allow TCP traffic to port 80.



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