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4

Er, that's the way it always works. If you are actually looking at a website via HTTP, you're very specifically not using HTTPS, and thus not using the certificate. You might be thinking of HTTP->HTTPS redirection; you can configure a webserver to redirect all HTTP requests automatically to HTTPS. Even though you type in HTTP, when the page finishes ...


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You can check the full list of HTTP request methods in RFC 7231. An attacker was probably assessing what your web server does with an invalid request.


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By using an absolute URL you issue a request against an HTTP proxy. To make a request against a HTTP server you need a relative URL. Also, HTTP/1.1 the use a a Host header: POST / HTTP/1.1 Host: homebrew.herokuapp.com


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You have more options than just no-cache in the Cache-Control header with regards to caching instructions for both visitors browser, as well as any intermediate caching proxy servers: private or public ; a private response is specific to a user and shouldn't be cached, a public response may be cached. no-cache does mostly what it sounds like and is an ...


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STILL WONDERING Why doesn't the provided AWS DNS Server work in this case? PROBLEM The problem was that DNS names weren't resolving via the local DNS server than Amazon provided when originally creating the VPC. I discovered that I could make outgoing HTTP/HTTPS connections to IP addresses, which didn't need to contact a DNS server to resolve. SOLUTION ...


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Gor might be worth the try. It supports forwarding requests to multiple different instances or dumping the traffic to file for later replay. It also supports adjusting the number of requests per second. This way you can replay traffic from production to staging and dev environments, always ensuring that your code works, while ensuring that you are not ...


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That log screams, to me, of either a cabling problem or a duplex mismatch between a device and the switch. I'd consider forcing the speed / duplex on the NICs on two devices (the server and a client) to 100Base-TX half-duplex and working up from there. Shoddy patch cables, bad NIC drivers, or a failing switch could cause these behaviors, too. It's important ...


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X-Sendfile removes X-Sendfile header. So in order to check if it works: Check if header does not exist when X-Sendfile is enabled Check if header exists if you disable X-Sendfile. Your file should not load You can watch headers with curl: curl -I URL Hope it helps :)


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In your try_files directive, you look up for image $uri$webp_suffix, which resolves to image.png.webp. I think you want to look up for $1$webp_suffix there. Otherwise, I recommend you to enable nginx debug_connection <your_IP> directive in your main configuration, and you will get a detailed log of what happens during the request. There you can better ...


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Why are you trying to send the data via GET request? Why just don't use POST as it was created for large data input? EDIT 1: It is very complicated to do this with nginx. If you still want to send it via get, install Apache instead of nginx and just edit LimitRequestLine param as suggested


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Here's a one-liner I came up with for displaying request and response HTTP headers using tcpdump (which should work for your case too): sudo tcpdump -A -s 10240 'tcp port 80 and (((ip[2:2] - ((ip[0]&0xf)<<2)) - ((tcp[12]&0xf0)>>2)) != 0)' | egrep --line-buffered "^........(GET |HTTP\/|POST |HEAD )|^[A-Za-z0-9-]+: " | sed -r ...


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If you are capturing packets on the server then you might see TCP sending out larger segments than the MTU. The packets on the wire , however, will be MTU size only. You can verify this by capturing on a network device (switch) etc. Alternatively capturing packets on the remote (client) machine will reveal that each packet is <= MTU . This behaviour is ...



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