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Yes, the hostname really is case-insensitive, as specified in RFC 3986 § 3.2.2, because hostnames in general are case-insensitive in the DNS. This RFC also gives recommendations on how to avoid the problems you mentioned: Although host is case-insensitive, producers and normalizers should use lowercase for registered names and hexadecimal addresses ...


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VirtualHost is what you want to use to serve both HTTP and HTTPS and different content for each. If you have one listening on port 80 and the other on 443, then having the same name isn't an issue. You don't need to do SSLDisable on the VirtualHost on port 80. You have one VirtualHost which handles the HTTPS traffic and another for HTTP traffic. You can ...


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If you created the Certificate Signing Request in IIS your private key is stored there. You should be able to export the certificate as a PFX file then extract the private key using the following article. http://www.completessl.com/faq/article.php?id=027


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Your private key lives on your server, yes. I think it lives inside the registry somewhere by default, but can easily export it using Windows' Certificate Management MMC Snapin. This process has essentially been the same since at least Windows Server 2003. Here is a walkthrough with screen shots: ...


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We are going around in circles in the comment thread above, so let me state this clearly for you in the form of an answer: once your users have entered an HTTPS URL in their browser, they are committed to having an HTTPS transaction with a server that has a properly-signed certificate matching the hostname they've entered before they can do anything else at ...


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I have found that, as of nginx 1.6.2 at least, the working syntax for me for the location block is: location ~ \.php$ { try_files $uri = 404; fastcgi_pass php fastcgi_index index.php; include fastcgi.conf; } that is: one should not specify the http:// protocol before referencing the php backend. The http://php syntax is to be used with the ...


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According to wikipedia article on status codes, Nginx has a custom error code when http traffic is sent to https port(error code 497) And according to nginx docs on error_page, you can define a URI that will be shown for a specific error. Thus we can create a uri that clients will be sent to when error code 497 is raised. nginx.conf #lets assume your IP ...



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