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For Windows guests you'd use Sysprep to generalize the VM that you're using as your template. I don't know if something similar exists for Linux. As for the MAC address, each cloned VM will have it's own unique MAC address, which is generated by Hyper-V so that shouldn't be an issue. As for the ip address, if you use DHCP to assign ip addresses then this ...


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Put the host OS on a partition on the standard HD. Leave some space on the standard HD for VM overflow... even if you can fit all of the VMs on the SSD right now, you need to expect some growth. Then put as much of the VM's as you can on the SSD. This may mean using multiple VHD's per VM, to separate the VM OS from the application hosted on that OS. If you ...


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You could use Storage Spaces to create two pools; one for SSD and one for HDD and allow SS to migrate the data around based on its IO requirements. I know for a fact this works great in a file-services system, I've not tried it with HV but there's no reason to assume it won't.


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You need either a Windows 8 workstation or a Windows Server 2012/R2 OS elsewhere, because Hyper-V server does not have the ability to run GUI tools (Hyper-V manager included). You add "Hyper-V" feature on that OS and connect to your Hyper-V server via Hyper-V manager console.


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You can setup Performance Monitor to log memory used per process. Under available counters, scroll down to the Process object, expand it. Add Private Bytes, Working Set and Working Set-Private. Make sure to select so it would show you a breakdown per individual process instead of totals. That will show you the memory allocated per process and hopefully ...


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We've had issues in the past when virtual machines have consumed too much memory and the host has locked up. There is a way to reserve some memory for Hyper-V which might help you. This solved some problems for us. The registry path to use is explained here. It's a DWORD and should be specified in MB, for example 2048. ...


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Windows Failover Clustering (which is what Hyper-V uses for clustering) requires shared storage of some sort. Further to Massimo's answer, and if I'm reading this page right, I don't think you can use exclusively SMB shares for a failover cluster. You'd still need some shared disks (SAS, iSCSI, FC) for the cluster portion, but you can store the Hyper-V VM ...


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You had to resize the filesystem to let the added space be usable. Try booting with a Parted live cd and resize you filesystem, then retry the refresh process.


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A dynamic VHD disk will not preallocate all the space on creation. It will expand its size as you use it, until it reaches the maximum size defined, or the available space on the host disk. If you create a 70GB disk, for instance, it will allocate a few GB and keep increasing the size until it reaches 70GB. It will stop growing on 70GB or when it exhausts ...


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There are two ways to 'view' a virtual hard drive. You can see it on the host system as a vhd file and you can see it as you described from inside the virtual machine as an attached drive. From disk management inside the virtual machine you will see no difference between a fixed size disk and a dynamic disk. If you created a 70GB disk either fixed or ...



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