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6

From the appropriately named (and fairly SEO-friendly) TechNet article "What is Sysprep?": [...] Sysprep also enables you to prepare an image to be delivered to a customer. When the customer boots Windows, Windows Welcome starts. Then, follows a general notice about appropriate usage: Sysprep must be used only to configure new installations of ...


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See http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/jj933287.aspx for an example of creating a VM and installing an OS from scratch. The steps are to create the vm, configure the vm, add the source ISO and a floppy with the unmattend.xml, then start the vm


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As a general rule it isn't the job of the hypervisor to install the os. Using your powershell to configure the vm you would then start your build process, which can also be scripted. Before I started using pxe boot MDT images I had unattended iso files I would mount. As soon as the system booted it ran the install self guided. I'm guessing something like ...


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Yes. PowerShell can do a lot with Hyper-V virtual machines. Take your pick form the following CMDlets: Add-VMDvdDrive Add-VMFibreChannelHba Add-VMHardDiskDrive Add-VMMigrationNetwork Add-VMNetworkAdapter Add-VMNetworkAdapterAcl Add-VMNetworkAdapterExtendedAcl Add-VmNetworkAdapterRoutingDomainMapping Add-VMRemoteFx3dVideoAdapter Add-VMScsiController ...


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check there: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/virtual_active_directory_domain_controller_virtualization_hyperv(v=ws.10).aspx The bug I seen in the past was if the DC die, my hyper-v console refused to open. So, like they told try to not create a single point of failure.


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1-1 was NEVER relevant. I would say 99% of the installs have a lot more virtual cores in various machines than physical cores - as long as the machines do not NEED the cores (most of the time) that works markedly well. 1-1 assignments only makes sense in VERY special cases (like a VM using up all CPU doing calculations) and is not a standard case at all.


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Basically, if you stop the 'Hyper V Virtual Machine Management' service it stops the 'Backing up' error and allows the virtual server to be started. Job Done!


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Creating, configuring and managing VMs can easily be done via PowerShell, as other have mentioned. However, if you want more control on the VM lifecycle, such as creating/deploying templates and cloning disks, you should have a look at System Center Virtual Machine Manager; its operations are, of course, completely scriptable via PowerShell.



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