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0

I did try to start Systemrescuecd in a 2nd gen machine. But it didn't work, so I created a new 1st gen machine and added the VHDX to it. systemrescuecd started. I didn't do any operations. Removed the 1st gen machine and put the VHDX back in the original machine. Then Ubuntu didn't start up at all. Only Grub-menu. See my post here: Hyper-V Ubuntu vhdx scsi ...


1

Heard about Disk2Vhd? This little tool here will convert your machine (physical or virtual) to a vhd disk on the fly. https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee656415.aspx


2

VMware Server 2.0 is kind of old, and had little or no remote management capabilities as we see in ESXi today. It was one of VMware's evolutionary dead ends. Nevertheless this ought to be possible. What I would do is the following. Note that the VM must be powered off. Locate VMware Server's datastore. The datastore details will tell you where the files ...


1

I would leave the second DC RW. In case of hardware failure, the SBS server might be down for [a day/four hours/whatever your support contract says] while you get the replacement part.


0

Here's a couple of things to check for: HP Service Pack: start with this, it will update the NICs drivers and firmware, the problem could be there? http://h17007.www1.hp.com/us/en/enterprise/servers/products/service_pack/spp/index.aspx RAM?: no kidding, some of my clients problem with the SMB performance turned out to be a RAM problem, since you're using ...


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Once the 2nd server is restored, was it still part of the domain? you will need to connect this server to the domain and add AD role. It can be RW domain but all FSMO roles will remain with SBS.


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It could be antivirus related. Configure AV exclusions for the following: Default virtual machine configuration directory (C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Windows\Hyper-V) Custom virtual machine configuration directories Default virtual hard disk drive directory(C:\Users\Public\Documents\Hyper-V\Virtual Hard Disks) Custom virtual hard disk drive directories ...


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I appear to have solved the issue by disabling large send offloading in the guest operating systems. Disabling it on the host didn't help but disabling it on the guests solved the issue.


2

See https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/azure/en-US/62d03380-41e5-4be8-a742-431a980bc318/csupload-produces-unknown-error-unsupported-virtual-size?forum=windowsazuredata Looks like it needs to be a whole number in MB. Dividing your number by 1024 two times (to reduce to KB, and then MB) doesn't result in a whole number. According to the thread you ...


1

Not much to add here since StarWind and HP VSA are already mentioned! Both products provide great value and do exactly what you're trying to accomplish. Keep in mind, you won't be able to shuffle the VMs back to local storage if it's already provisioned as storage pool for either HP VSA or StarWind. However, StarWind's storage is always available in ...


1

StarWind Virtual SAN is pretty much everything you need. Unlike VM-running home-brewed solution GregL was mentioning this particular one is 100% native to Hyper-V as it's Windows app: simple to install and no VM patching mess. + performance. If you're fine with VMs take a look @ HP StoreVirtual VSA. It would be 1TB limited in capacity for their free version ...


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I would think your only way to accomplish this would be to setup your own, home-grown version, of vSAN with a locally hosted "controllers". Something like this, or a set of clustered FreeNAS/OpenFiler instances running DRBD should do the trick. I wouldn't rely on it for primary storage purposes, but it might do OK in a pinch when you need to do disruptive ...


2

Failover clusters require shared storage. Without it, if a machine dies, the data on them is inaccessible and there's no way to failover without the data. I don't believe there is any built in fault tolerant method of using the local drives. For clustered virtual machines, you need shared storage, and internal drives don't qualify. What you can do, ...


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You, like almost everybody else who's new to this area, are confusing disk sharing and file sharing. Here's another question where I tried to explain the difference between these two: File Sharing using Hyper-V Shared VHDX


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Try this one: Second alpha version of Hyper-V Web Interface. What new: Authentication Bugfixes (hope I not added new bugs) Other internal webserver improvements Configuration help page added Currently 2 types of authentication are supported: Basic and Windows. System requirements for host system: Hyper-V 3.0 Hyper-V Server 2012, Windows 2012 Server ...


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We use a service account to manage our servers instead of our regular user accounts. So when you launch Hyper-V Manager you have to say "Run as Different User" and then enter in your service account credentials.


2

You also need to extend the volume in the guest using disk management. (Screenshot shows shrink, but you must extend)


5

I feel like you're looking for a one line answer, so here it is: You should have a physical DC if you do not trust your virtual environment's ability to withstand failure. We could wax on about the peculiarities and exceptions with each scenario, but I think this strikes the root of the question.


2

Turn off and delete the failed DC. Perform a metadata cleanup. Rebuild the failed DC. https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc816907(v=ws.10).aspx


7

I too wouldn't make the Hyper-V host a DC. As for whether or not you should have a physical DC, my opinion is that with the changes Microsoft has implemented regarding virtualized Domain Controllers in general and DC-less cluster bootstrapping specifically, I don't personally see the need for, nor do I advocate having a physical DC. Maintaining a physical ...


16

One rationale for retaining one physical DC per domain is if there is a major incident that affects the host or trashes the frame storage for the virtualized DC's, you would have at least one physical DC with local storage to perform recovery and maintain continuity. Microsoft continues to perform this check and make this recommendation during Active ...


3

Let's take clusters out the equation and focus on the one line in your question that makes me shudder. Should I still be considering having a physical DC along-side my single, non-clustered 2012/2012R2 Hyper-V host that has a single virtualised DC on it? Why, why, why, would you want a single DC? In any given environment we try to avoid having single ...


1

A better idea is to use the built in NIC teaming. I would set it up as: One NIC for the host OS, so I can access the host even if some of the other networking is broken. Two NICs in a team for all the VMs One NIC left over, possibly for use in clustering or live migrations if another server ever gets added. By using teams you get a few advantages: ...


0

Hyper-V offers both full hardware virtualization and paravirtualization to its guest VMs. Which one you use depends on what you install in the guest. With Windows guests, this is either a matter of installing the Integration Services in the guest (by telling Hyper-V to insert the IC DVD-ROM image into the virtual DVD drive) or, for Server 2012 R2 guests, ...


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There seems to be an issue binding an external virtual switch to a wireless physical adapter. The whole issue is described here. To make a long story short, the solution is to assign a static IP to the VM's virtual adapter. If you happen to connect your wifi adapter to a network with another subnet range, you have to edit your VM's IP address. update: An ...


2

If your goal is backups, then you should be using Hyper-V aware backup software (something that uses the Hyper-V VSS writer). While the VM is running, the .vhd/.vhdx file is locked. If you want to backup files within the VM, then use any backup software you like that will backup flat files/sql/exchange/whatever. It sounds like the VM portion it throwing ...


1

You can use the following to set the name of a Virtual Machine managed by SCVMM 2012 R2: Get-SCVirtualMachine -Name "VM03" | Set-SCVirtualMachine -Name "VM04" Cmdlet reference: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj654500(v=sc.20).aspx


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Be aware that Windows is using dynamic port allocation for some services e.g. Disk management. https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/929851?wa=wsignin1.0 Meaning Microsoft finally uses one of these ports 49152 - 65535.



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