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4

You shouldn't use the SATA drive but it's not because of performance. Host system disk performance doesn't matter much. But since you don't have two 80GB SATA disks, you have no redundancy and that disk becomes a single point of failure for everything running on the server.


1

Convert the disk type to a "dynamically expanding" disk. (The more common term, which comes from the VMware world, is thin-provisioned disk). Looks like there's a walk through with screenshots on this Technet blog. And, of course, as a best practice, this is why you have a separate system partition on your servers, and just use it for the operating system ...


0

I found the correct answer and the short version is there is no zero downtime solution to migrate from a 2008R2 Hyper-v stack to a 2012 stack. Longer version is here: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/clustering/archive/2012/06/25/10323434.aspx


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How big is the drive? Due to Hyper-V restrictions it cannot be larger than 128GB. http://www.andrew-kirkpatrick.com/2013/01/how-to-install-centos-6-on-microsoft-hyper-v/ I note in the 2nd screenshot that vmbus_0_1, vmbus_0_2 and vmbus_0_4 error out, that vmbus_0_3 does not; from the first I'd assume this is the virtual CD drive (i.e. IDE bus 1 dev 1); This ...


1

1) You need odd number of enclosures for enclosure awareness as with only two you're going to lose both data disk and witness disk for pool. Means cluster would be dead with 50% probability (depending on what actual enclosure would go South). So one is OK (no protection), three is OK, five is OK and four, six etc are NOT OK. 2) You need SAS JBODs ...


0

You can't slow down the networking on the guest VM, but you can place it behind a router which will take care of slowing down the connection; that router can be another WM with two network interfaces, running a tool capable of customizing the network bandwidth and latency to your needs. There are various tools for this, one of the most versatile and easiest ...


4

The best method I have found for simulating a crapy internet connection is to put a pfsense router between the server and my test PC and setup the Limiter features. https://doc.pfsense.org/index.php/Traffic_Shaping_Guide#Limiter This can be used to emulate a slow network, latency or even introduce packet loss to see how your applications react to adverse ...


-1

Not out of the box. You also do not need the machine to be slower - you want to simulate a LAN connection, i.e. low bandwidth (which can be done in Hyper-V 2012 R2 to a certain aspect) and latency. Latency is really hard to do - i know of no software doing that - because it would mean buffering all packets. LAN badiwdth is easy - run it all through a ...


1

In addition to the answer from Bartłomiej, I would also recommend changing the Team load balancing mode to Hyper-V port and set both adapters in the team to active: This way you utilize both adapters in the team actively.


1

I realize this post is a couple months old, but you should update your version of Essentials, Microsoft has bundled in Hyper-V with Essentials, both the service as well as the manager. http://blogs.technet.com/b/sbs/archive/2013/09/03/understanding-licensing-for-windows-server-2012-r2-essentials-and-the-windows-server-essentials-experience-role.aspx


1

As a DataDomain is basically a "standard server", you can probably just install Linux/Windows on it, and use it as iSCSI target


0

Register: If you have a virtual machine were you have already put all of the virtual machine files exactly where you want them, and you just need Hyper-V to start using the virtual machine where it is. Restore: If your virtual machine files are stored on a file share / removable drive / etc… and you want Hyper-V to move the files to the appropriate location ...


0

Like the comment said, 2012 R2 is actually pretty solid for use in this scenario. As for remote access, each machine should have it's own remote access and shouldn't depend on the host or other VMs, meaning that you don't want to 'walk' anyone thorough adding your host on their Hyper-V manager to access their VM. If they can't remote desktop to it, then too ...


0

I would personally have a separate physical firewall (Netscreen or whatever you're confortable with) that handles the VPN separately and invest in an out-of-band management system (like Dell's DRAC) to give you low-level access to your server (and firewall's console port if/when you want to update your firmware) in case of hung or crashed (trust me: this ...


1

Your guest VMs will all appear as single-socket, multi-core processors (assuming you give them more than one virtual processor) unless you either reconfigure the VM manually or add enough virtual processors that you've exceeded the number of cores that your physical processors have. If you want confirmation on how your VM appears to the running workload, I ...


4

Register: If you have a virtual machine were you have already put all of the virtual machine files exactly where you want them, and you just need Hyper-V to start using the virtual machine where it is. Restore: If your virtual machine files are stored on a file share / removable drive / etc… and you want Hyper-V to move the files to the appropriate location ...


3

This error occurs when two virtual machines try to use the same DVD drive. To resolve this error, go to the virtual machine’s Media menu and un-capture the DVD drive. If the virtual machine needs access to the DVD drive then you will have to determine which virtual machine is presently using it and release the DVD drive from that virtual machine.


3

From: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn282285.aspx Generation 1 Provides the same virtual hardware to the virtual machine as in previous versions of Hyper-V. Generation 2 Provides the following new functionality on a virtual machine: PXE boot by using a standard network adapter Boot from a SCSI virtual hard disk Boot ...


0

I think that a virtual machine for which the “Planned Failover” has been initiated is turned off at the Primary Server and turned on at the Replica Server if you selected to do so. Such virtual machines cannot be turned on at the Primary Server unless replication is broken or the reverse replication is initiated. This is expected behavior from Hyper-V ...


1

Looks like the quoted KB has been updated: LINK: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2779204/ Solution: Perform the following steps on the Hyper-V host machine: Logon as a Domain Administrator Install the Group Policy Management feature from the Server Manager console After installation, open the GPMC MMC snap-in and browse to the policy that manages User ...


0

You can have high availability in that kind of configuration if you make the storage cluster highly available and configure it so that the SMB shares are "continuously available." In order to set that up, you need at least two machines in the file server cluster and you need SAS connections from each of the file servers to each of the enclosures. You need ...


0

What is the best way to achieve high availability and redundancy in this setup ? Should I use replica's or a HV cluster ? Both are not capable of doing any HA. Replica (assuming you talk of DFS replication, which is the only replication that is supported with the technology you name) will not replicate open files so you gain no high availability. ...


0

That was a lot of questions. I'm not able to answer them all at once, but I can share some thoughts with you, in regards to the general hardware requirements/specs. Depending on your budget, I would consider adding some SSD cache. It's supported by the newer HP controllers (P22x/P42x/P82x). If you add enough cache, you might be able to get away with using ...


1

You want the "remove-vmnetworkadapter" cmdlet in PowerShell. Merely looking at Device Manager will only allow you to add or remove device drivers from "devices" in the machine, where in this case the device is virtual. If you want a list of the virtual NICs that are exposed to the management OS (which is what you're showing above) you can use this command: ...


0

MS support was unable to isolate a cause for this condition;however, migrating all vm's off of the host, and then back fixed the utilization issue. I can only assume that it was something in the way the VM's were interfacing with the physical processors and the migration process eliminated it.


0

Snapshots in Hyper-V include, in addition to the virtual disks, the state of memory and the virtual processors (along with sundry other stuff.) So when you apply the snapshot, anything that was in the virtual machines memory related to the file systems on the virtual disks is still there, and still coherent. The file systems on the virtual disks don't get ...



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