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MDMarra is Correct, use the Hyper-V Server which is free. You need to manage it with remote tools though. to answer your first question, You can Migrate a 2012R2 VM if it is Version 1. If its a Version 2 you would have to do a disk copy of sorts to a version 1 VHD.


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I suspect your issue is Windows Dynamic Cache. Basically, if your disk isn't fast enough to keep up, Windows caches the writes in memory and may use up to 100% of the memory for this. You can, as of February 2014, manage the size of the cache yourself with this utility from Microsoft.


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Try to use the robocopy tool (should be included on this Windows version) and see what you get this time. Also prior beginning the copy either using GUI or robocopy open Resource Monitor by typing resmon and watch out I/O values as the other guy also suggested.


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The reason your virtual adapter is listed as an unidentified network is because it does not have an IPv4 default gateway assigned. Get that specified in Network Connections and you'll be on your way. But if he set default gateway for Internal switch - 66.171.178.177 , gateway and IP address(192.168.137.1) are not on same subnet = error !


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If you are looking for a fast VHDX creation tool consider the Systola VhdxTool: It works almost like VHDTool but for VHDX and even offers compatible command line.


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TLDR - this would be a bad plan for a business. Each sync would be a full sync. Backing up the VHDX file will backup the data, but it isn't a full VM backup. If you restored over the existing VHDX you wouldn't notice, but if you had to restore to a new server, you'd lose the VM configuration. If you just need a point in time, you could do an export from ...


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Acronis Backup Advanced can do that. It can transfer by scheme - physical-virtual, virtual-physical, virtual-virtual, physical-physical


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This change can be done from the PowerShell command window. In the ribbon inside VMM click the PowerShell button Run the command $YourCluster = Get-SCVMHostCluster -Name YOUR-CLUSTER-NAME replacing YOUR-CLUSTER-NAME with the name of your cluster. Run the command $YourRunAs = Get-SCRunAsAccount -Name "YOURRUNASACCOUNT" replacing YOURRUNASACCOUNT with the ...


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After a bit more searching it seems like this is a general problem with modern server CPUs, even unrelated to virtualization, and major server vendors as well as software vendors like Microsoft and VMWare ship their products with default settings that artificially limit your CPU performance. I still find that hard to believe. The solution for anybody who ...


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I've only seen this sporadically. In theory speedstep (which is increasingly becoming a non configurable option it seems), should not affect your performance. However when it's stepped down, and you suddenly get busy in a single VM, sometimes it seems like the processor just doesn't think it's enough. I'm not sure this is a Microsoft issue, since as you ...


-1

Its a bios feature on server to remove speedstep. On IBM blade its a default bios option : no speedstep and sometime no turbo. check that blog technical details : https://workinghardinit.wordpress.com/tag/c-states/ "Depending on your findings and needs you might just want turn SpeedStep or Cool’n’Quiet off either in the BIOS or in windows" So if you have ...


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Physical hardware is best if possible. I have seen a lot of chicken and egg type scenarios where people are having problems getting their virtual machines to boot up. They can't log into their virtual machine hosts to fix the problems because the domain controllers aren't running to authenticate them (because they are on the VM hosts having issues). How ...


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The article you are quoting is about Hyper-V Server 2008 R2, you are using 2012. In the 2012 version there is no option Allow MMC Remote Management, use: 1) Enable Remote Management


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check there: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/virtual_active_directory_domain_controller_virtualization_hyperv(v=ws.10).aspx The bug I seen in the past was if the DC die, my hyper-v console refused to open. So, like they told try to not create a single point of failure.


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If you've created an external virtual switch bound to those NICs then you shouldn't have TCP/IP bound to those NICs unless you check the box "allow management operating system to share this network adapter", which it sounds like you didn't do and don't want if you have a dedicated NIC for the Host communication. It sounds like you enabled TCP/IP on those ...


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Hyper-V doesn't work like this. Forward ports as you would to physical servers - start looking at your firewalls or load balancing appliances.


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From the appropriately named (and fairly SEO-friendly) TechNet article "What is Sysprep?": [...] Sysprep also enables you to prepare an image to be delivered to a customer. When the customer boots Windows, Windows Welcome starts. Then, follows a general notice about appropriate usage: Sysprep must be used only to configure new installations of ...


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1-1 doesn't make sense at all. Because the overall aim of virtualization is to use the server resources more efficiently and to have a number of virtual servers within a physical server. In our infrastructure a single physical host has just 4 cores, but we do maintain quite a good number of virtual servers. So, no need to worry about that.


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1-1 was NEVER relevant. I would say 99% of the installs have a lot more virtual cores in various machines than physical cores - as long as the machines do not NEED the cores (most of the time) that works markedly well. 1-1 assignments only makes sense in VERY special cases (like a VM using up all CPU doing calculations) and is not a standard case at all.


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The solution I ended up going with was to create a VBScript that runs on startup (using cscript and Task Scheduler). The script: set wmi = GetObject("winmgmts:{impersonationLevel=impersonate,(Shutdown)}!\\.\root\cimv2") set batteryColl = wmi.ExecQuery("select * from Win32_Battery") set osColl = wmi.ExecQuery("select * from Win32_OperatingSystem") while ...


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Check my answer here: Cannot create Hyper-V Virtual Machine - General Access Denied 0x80070005 what you might find useful there: a suggestion to use Process Monitor to find out exactly what is going wrong in the process if your problem is broken file permissions on your config files, and it seems like a possibility, you can use or adapt my batch file to ...


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Basically, if you stop the 'Hyper V Virtual Machine Management' service it stops the 'Backing up' error and allows the virtual server to be started. Job Done!


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I never solved this and due to lack of time, just decided to put in a hard drive and install to that instead of trying to boot from USB. I did notice that when I had successfully booted from USB using Windows Server 2012 that performance of the host (not guests) was quite bad. Loading powershell for example took a long time.


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You need to add the drivers for your server's storage subsystem to your USB flash drive's image of Windows. See dism.exe for the easiest way to do that.


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Aside from installing from media using an unattend file, it's entirely possible, and probably faster, to configure recent versions of Windows entirely offline. You'd create a VHD using the Hyper-V PowerShell cmdlets. Then you'd install a Windows image in it. Then you'd connect the VHD to a VM and boot it. Perhaps the easiest way to do that would be to ...


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Creating, configuring and managing VMs can easily be done via PowerShell, as other have mentioned. However, if you want more control on the VM lifecycle, such as creating/deploying templates and cloning disks, you should have a look at System Center Virtual Machine Manager; its operations are, of course, completely scriptable via PowerShell.


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See http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/jj933287.aspx for an example of creating a VM and installing an OS from scratch. The steps are to create the vm, configure the vm, add the source ISO and a floppy with the unmattend.xml, then start the vm


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As a general rule it isn't the job of the hypervisor to install the os. Using your powershell to configure the vm you would then start your build process, which can also be scripted. Before I started using pxe boot MDT images I had unattended iso files I would mount. As soon as the system booted it ran the install self guided. I'm guessing something like ...


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Yes. PowerShell can do a lot with Hyper-V virtual machines. Take your pick form the following CMDlets: Add-VMDvdDrive Add-VMFibreChannelHba Add-VMHardDiskDrive Add-VMMigrationNetwork Add-VMNetworkAdapter Add-VMNetworkAdapterAcl Add-VMNetworkAdapterExtendedAcl Add-VmNetworkAdapterRoutingDomainMapping Add-VMRemoteFx3dVideoAdapter Add-VMScsiController ...



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