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Whatever URL has been navigated to is what will decide the Host header value. Ie, DNS does not actually affect this. On the DNS side of things you will simply want to ensure that the relevant names resolve to the correct IP addresses (A records will be fine for this). On the web server side of things you will want to map the relevant host names to go to ...


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You're getting things mixed up. As HÃ¥kan Lindqvist stated in his answer, all you need to do is to set up the A record in your DNS zone for the name of the site (somesite.yourdomain.com) and set up matching host headers in the IIS bindings of the appropriate website on your server. There's no "redirection" taking place, there's no need for a CNAME record. All ...


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Adding onto what the others have said and clarifying it. Yes you're getting mixed up between DNS and Host header. The DNS system is just for resolving names. This is how it works. Basically in the browser you'll enter in a URL like: http://www.example.com In DNS, an A record for www.example.com resolves to 93.184.216.34. Lets say that 93.184.216.34 is ...


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I struggled a long time with the same thing. What worked for me was: On the machine where you installed he IIS role: open a cmd window with elevated privileges (run as administrator) Type netsh Type http type show sslcert use the command "delete sslcert ipport=ip-addr:8172" and remove all certificates having to do with port 8172 Uninstall the IIS ...



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