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10

The -t argument will tell duplicity from what time to restore. duplicity -t 3D --file-to-restore FILENAME scp://uid@other.host/some_dir /home/me/restored_file Will restore FILENAME from 3 days ago.


7

You have to exclude unnecessary files. Good start is -x -x, --one-file-system don't cross filesystem boundaries (from man rsync(1)). That excludes filesystems you didn't specify explicitly. Remember that then you have to list all mount points you want to include. mount gives list for you. Another useful option is --exclude: --exclude=PATTERN ...


6

Yes you can, here is a tutorial to do just that.


6

If you just want to keep a remote copy of the file then using something based on rsync will probably work for you. Rsync only copies the parts of the file that have changed so it can reduce the amount of data you have to to copy. For windows you could use deltacopy or syncrify.


5

you can also give rdiff-backup a try. it has version for windows too. i use it for nightly backups of [in total] few hundreds GB of data.


5

I am assuming you are using one of the mayor distributions If I needed to do the same as you I would use git for everything related to config files (/etc, /usr/local/etc, etc) I would avoid to version bin files unless you are compiling your own packages. And I would use the native package manager of each distribution to replicate the installation of the ...


5

Yes, they need to specify the copy_only option: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms191495.aspx http://www.mssqltips.com/tip.asp?tip=1075 This option is not available in the GUI interface, so the backup would have to be done from a script or query window.


5

I think it's reasonable to want a full backup every so often: most of my machines are configured to do one every few months. There's nothing magic about that number: the right value is going to depend on how much data you have, how fast it changes, how likely you are to want to restore from anything other than the most recent snapshot, how much traffic and ...


5

I would probably write a completion file to the central server that includes the date and hostname; you could use this: #!/bin/bash # when each backup completes, write a completion file: ssh user@central-server "touch /path/to/completion-files/$HOST-$(date +%F).complete" And on the central server: #!/bin/bash # on the central server, run this before ...


5

I know it is annoying to "not answer" answer questions, but this seems to call for it. The impression I get from reading this is sounds like you are working from what you know how to implement to a solution, instead of a solution/business needs to how to implement it. The big picture here is that it sounds like you have been put in the position of the ...


4

You'll have to schedule backups to UNC paths using the command-line wbadmin tool, as you've noted in your comment. Be warned that backing-up to a UNC path results in only a single generation of backup being stored. Each backup erases the previous backup. This is not the behavior that you'd have been seeing with a locally-attached USB disk. An SMB mounted ...


4

Someone has already written a script that does this, and it has a lot of great features, plus it has been tested by many people for years. It is called "rsnapshot". I highly recommend "rsnapshot". It is easy to configure and will do a 3-day retention, or even more complex retention policies. http://www.rsnapshot.org/


4

I've done some extensive searching in the last week for something similar. I have found no solutions to do all 4 steps. There are numerous blogs from home users who try the 'rsync to btrfs'-type of backups, and all of the major Btrfs wikis cover how to perform Btrfs snapshots. There are also quite a few people who are attempting different ways of rotating ...


4

Another option besides using rsync is to configure mysql replication with each of the normal databases as masters, and the ones in your office as a slave for each master. You can read mysql's documentation here.. If you want to keep with the scp/rsync style backup, you can maybe add compression to the backup with bzip, or some other method. There is also ...


4

you could continue doing what you're currently doing with a few minor changes to your rsync backup scripts. rsync can run inside a VM and backup to a remote host via ssh, just as it can from a physical machine. e.g. i backup /etc, /usr/local/, /home, parts of /var and a few other directories from all my machines to /var/backups/hosts/$HOSTNAME on my backup ...


4

How often do you backup your servers? The standard backup is done nightly, there are a few backups that are done more frequently. How do you ensure that all of your Linux servers are properly backed up? The backup send a report with a good subject on success or failure. I check that I have received the status messages at least a couple times a ...


4

Short answer: yes Long answer: The file access times may differ but if you use rsync -ci that will force it to compute a checksum for the source and destination file. The -i option will give you verbose output for what changes in each file. Run it with -n to start out with and it will just tell you what it will do without transferring anything. You will ...


4

I suggest rsync. It's the standard tool for this sort of thing, and I gather it works on Windows as well.


3

I do this using wget. In my case it's Linux to Linux but this should work equally well on a Windows box. While it may not be obvious from the command, this is indeed an incremental backup. The relevant line is: wget -c --mirror ftp://username:password@ftpserver/ -o logfile -P destination


3

I use a self written bash script for it using rsync and cpio: http://pastebin.com/uRdH2uQf So, the first thing I have done is create a directory structure. I work like this: create a backup every day, the 7th day (sunday) I take the last backup (previous week sunday) and put it in weekly. Every 4 weeks I keep a monthly backup. All these backups are ...


3

Windows 2000? You could just use NTBackup and have it write the bkf file to the hard drive. I don't have any more machines with Win2000, so I can't give any details about that version of NTBackup, but it's pretty straightforward.


3

Backuppc might be your answer. -- http://backuppc.sourceforge.net/ From the doc: Identical Files BackupPC pools identical files using hardlinks. By ``identical files'' we mean files with identical contents, not necessary the same permissions, ownership or modification time. Two files might have different permissions, ownership, or modification time but ...


3

Do it via a NAS share (samba or NFS). I use Time Machine to back up to a ReadyNAS (which runs Linux under the hood). Here are my notes on how to do so. Enable NAS backups. - defaults write com.apple.systempreferences TMShowUnsupportedNetworkVolumes 1 Find MAC address - ifconfig en0 | grep ether | sed s/://g | sed s/ether// Command to create ...


3

What you are asking for is called a synthetic full backup, which refers to the process of getting a full backup by merging an incremental backup with a previous full backup on the destination side (ie: the backup server). I'm not familiar with Duplicity, but from their website it appears to not do synthetic full backups. You must keep all of the ...


3

I've never been a fan of using hard drives as a primary means of backup storage and retention. IMHO, you're better off using tape backups for long term and archival backups and hard drives for short term, near-line backups. There are a bazillion different ways to accomplish your goals so I'll just propose our method as one for your consideration: We run a ...


3

man rsync it does exactly what you need to be more specific - you must have rsync --daemon on the machine with the files and the following command on the machine the backup is stored /usr/bin/rsync -avz 1.2.3.4::ETC/ /some/dir/to/store/the/backup where 1.2.3.4 is the ip of the machine and ETC is defined in /etc/rsyncd.conf as seen below [ETC] ...


3

You are describing log shipping, but you want to use 'differential' backups instead of log backups, which is the problem with your approach. With log shipping you restore the database once, then apply log backups as they are being created on the principal site, and you never ever have to redo the initial full backup restore. Just keep applying the log ...


3

Have you considered rsnapshot? It uses rsync for the incremental backup, but gives you as many snapshots as you want (and have space for). Similar to jcisio's suggestion, but fully packaged.


3

ZFS-based filesystems support exposure of a .zfs/snapshot subdirectory that functions in the same manner as the NetApp example you gave. If you have a fileserver presenting home directories to users (via CIFS, NFS, etc.), a ZFS-based solution could provide this functionality. Options these days include NexentaStor, Solaris, OpenIndiana, FreeBSD.


3

Keep the previous dump and use rsync or even better, rdiff-backup ( http://www.nongnu.org/rdiff-backup/ ) through ssh instead of plain scp.



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