Tag Info

New answers tagged

-3

SELECT FLOOR(NUMBER_PAGES_GET/(NUMBER_PAGES_GET+NUMBER_PAGES_READ) * 100) as InnoDB_Buffer_Pool_Hit_Rate FROM information_schema.INNODB_BUFFER_POOL_STATS;


2

Beyond the shadow of any doubt, I strongly believe it is the InnoDB Storage Engine. It is almost like a living, breathing organism. Here is a Pictorial Representation from Percona's CTO Vadim Tkachenko Please note the InnoDB Buffer Pool. If it has lots of dirty pages (changes to write back to the physical tables) and corresponding index changes (Insert ...


0

The issue is not related to storage engine, the problem might be because few SQL queries are taking too high CPU resource to process for that particular site/application. This might be because the query is using "un-indexed" columns or the query is not efficient. Better to understand the issue enable "slow query" log on the mysql. ...


1

So I never quite figured out exactly how to trigger the problem, but it had something to do with really large innodb tables in one of our databases. One of them was over 303 million lines long. When I setup some scripts to remove old data every night, the problem went away for good. These really weren't very important tables, and were for the most part only ...


1

This log entry is the key to the most likely issue: 141207 20:50:34 mysqld_safe Number of processes running now: 0 If there is not an extremely verbose block of log messages, including a stack trace, immediately before this line, then MySQL's not actually crashing... the kernel is killing it because another process (such as the web server) is making ...


2

In general case innodb_force_recovery mode is supposed to let a user to start InnoDB and dump valuable data. A common belief InnoDB will heal tablespace after enabling innodb_force_recovery. No, it won't. (In some cases you can fix a tablespace dropping particular tables, but that's another story). If you are lucky enough and MySQL starts the next step is ...


1

innodb_buffer_pool_size requires restarting MySQL. Why ? Take a look at Percona's Vadim Tkachenko's Pictorial Representation of InnoDB In the upper left corner, you see the InnoDB Buffer Pool. It has Data and Index Pages for InnoDB Tables and a giant scratch pad for migrating secondary index changes from the Buffer Pool to the Insert Buffer. All those ...



Top 50 recent answers are included