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14

The Blue Pill was a proof of concept, that this could be potentially used by malware, making that malware completely invisible to the OS.


6

KVM provides full hardware virtualization, but you can use paravirtualized disk and network drivers (virtio). Most current Linux distributions will use them by default provided you've configured them when setting up the VM. Since you expanded your question, I'll expand my answer. In full hardware virtualization, every component of the virtual PC appears to ...


6

There are none. The AMD-V feature was introduced on Athlon processors that used Socket AM2 (the successor of Socket 939) and on Opterons that used Socket AM2 and Socket F. Socket 939 AMD Virtualization List of AMD Athlon 64 microprocessors List of AMD Opteron microprocessors


4

Which Core 2 Duo? Not all Core 2s have the VT extensions. JR PS See http://www.intel.com/products/processor_number/chart/core2duo.htm for a list of which Core 2's support VT.


4

No, it is not possible. For running 32-bit virtual machines you need to have Intel VT-x / AMD-V support at least. For 64-bit machines, you need SLAT/EPT (Intel) or RVI/NPT (AMD) as well. Nested ESXi hypervisor should be working since VMware Workstation 7. For more details, I would recommend you to check Installing ESXi 5.x in VMware Workstation ...


3

On a Notebook it is useful if you want to run virtual machines, like Virtualbox, KVM or similar. Of course it would make no sense to run a production Hyper-V on a notebook, but for presentation reasons it might come handy. But simple virtualization is commonplace nowadays, if only for safe(r) web browsing. With the drive towards greener IT, it can make ...


3

KVM supports para-virtualization for certain drivers, but not for the entire Guest. They explicitly define themselves as a full virtualization solution for Linux.


3

This link states that amd-v is not in any socket 939/940 opterons. Wikipedia's list of AMD processors also states that the amd-v feature is absent in any socket 939/940 processors as well.


3

VMDc is for assigning a single VM its own personal NIC, which breaks all the fun stuff of VMs like live migrations. VMDq is an extension of processing offload and buffering, often called NetQueue. Go ahead and get that, though it's not going to be a huge boost unless you have some major workloads on the NICs.


3

Why not just reinstall, which would reset the configuration.


3

Some vendors, like Sony, for my Vaio, disable Intel VT and do not provide a BIOS option to turn it on, even though the processor supports it fine. I managed to enable it on my Vaio, but not without a serious amount of research, luck and trouble. If there is not option in your BIOS and you are sure your specific Core2Duo supports VT, complain at Dell ...


2

Hardware Virtualization is not required for Workstation 7 or Player 3 for 32 bit Guests although it may be required for 64 bit Guests. It is definitely required if you intend to virtualize ESX. The links you provided are for ESX 4. Edited to add: The Release 3 Installation Guide specifies the following: Processor Support for 64-Bit Guest ...


2

It should work, but you'll only be able to run 32bit OSes (at least if it's the same as VMware Server, VirtualBox, etc etc)


2

I know it'd likely be more cost effective to buy a new system with AMD-V or Intel VT-x AMD is cost effective. Intel, not so much. That's not to say Intel's processors are worse, but in terms of costs they're more expensive than AMD. .. but to prove it, I need to know if there are any 939 socket chips that feature AMD-V and if so what they ...


2

I am not sure of the entire range of 939 processors, but this was a review I found reviewing the technology and amd was quoted: http://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-cpu-windows-xp-mode,7739.html “With the exceptions of Sempron-branded processors and Turion K8 Rev E processors, all notebook processors shipped by AMD include AMD-V and therefore support ...


1

Likely you need to enable VT in the BIOS.


1

While creating VMs using virt-install or any virtualization product/tool , you need to specify the type of virtualiztion you want. Ex:- with virt-install -v ensures hvm machine and -p gives you a paravirtualized machine. With linux also one needs to enable VT support if present. Yes Yes. With VT enabled and type of VM chosen the virtualization type changes ...


1

In short, when dong virtualization, adds hardware acceleration making the VMs preform better. I think it might also add in some other virtualization features like better access to physical hardware but I'm not sure about that


1

It would allow you to run a hypervisor such as Hyper-V or ESX.


1

Assuming you don't expect any data to still exist on the SSD drives, disable VT-D, reboot and create a new datastore in the storage tab on the SSD's. That would become your "persistent storage".


1

I found out how to do it with Upstart. I needed to edit /etc/event.d/tty2 to change the exec line to point to getty -n -l my_program 38400 tty2, then I needed to edit rc.local to contain the line chvt 2, and remove GDM from my startup list so the chvt line would work.


1

Yep, all Nehalem/Westmere chips support EPT, so that's the 55xx/56xx/75xx ones plus I'm sure the 35xx/36xx series too (sorry but I'm no expert at workstation chips).


1

Windows doesn't have a Xen kernel modules available. Xen can only do paravirtualization without VT. To run Windows Xen needs VT to run full hardware based virtualization. I don't know exactly how ESX does it though.


1

VMware frequently does not use VT, because their technology often provides better performance than is possible with VT. E.g., VMware Workstation allows you to enable VT use, but the default on my machine is to not use it. In fact, usually VT needs to be enabled in the BIOS, because there are attacks on VT (and similar technologies) such as the BluePill ...


1

Apart from the security issues mentioned I guess as it enables a few new instructions, some new parts of the actual cpu is being activated which could actually be or have become broken and cause some malfunctions, local heat issues or whatnot - destabilizing some applications perhaps? Just a speculation. Should be true of all features you can enable I guess ...



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