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16

i7z is a good tool for monitoring Intel Turbo Boost for Intel CPUs that support it (i7 and later) on Linux. If it is working, you will see the current frequency change as you add load to the CPUs, due to the multiplier increasing dynamically under load. Try BurnP6 for this. Basic description (pdf) of power states: C0 - active state. While in C0, ...


14

When selecting a CPU architecture for a web-server, you do need to know what you're doing with the server itself. Only you can tell if what you're doing can take advantage of multiple cores, or if it is solidly single-threaded. PassMark's PerformanceTest product test distils CPU performance down to a single number, yet what you're doing with your web-server ...


13

From what I've seen, there are three things to be aware of for i-series processors vs Xeon series processors: Xeon processors can typically be used in multi-cpu motherboards; i-Series processors cannot (just like the sales guy told you). This is by far the largest difference between between the processors themselves. Certainly a good i7 processor has the ...


13

Should be very little difference in performance between two dual core CPUs and a single quad core CPU, if you are using current Intel Xeons. However, you might expect to see slightly better performance from the quad-core CPU if it is a "true" Quad core design, ala the new AMD Opterons or the new Xeon W5xxx (aka the Core i7 / Nehalem) series. ...


10

Faster DDR memory should always work in a system that only supports slower clocked memory - it's part of the spec. However you do have to stick with the stated type (ie DDR3\DDR2\DDR). I would generally advise someone to buy the correctly rated memory but if all the parts are built to spec then there should be no issue using faster rated memory in an ...


10

Please help Dude, a reality check. Machines BREAK DOWN. When they break down, they get fixed or replaces. YOu must be VERY new to life if you never needed for example a car mechanic. Things DO break down, there is nothing special about it. Now, what to do? SIMPLE. Depending on when the server was purchased, do one of the following: contact shop for ...


9

I think round here you will get many people suggesting an extra drive and RAID 10 rather than RAID 5 as the write performance is much higher under load. I personally would say if the drives aren't going to see high IOPS (especially random IOPS) then RAID 5 would do. However I've noticed you have chosen WD Green SATA drives - I would consider these a very ...


9

The RAID on that motherboard is not real hardware RAID, it's "fakeraid" that depends on drivers in the operating system. ESXi doesn't support fakeraid, because it's aimed at enterprise environments (which use real hardware RAID for better performance), not consumer PCs (which use fakeraid because it's cheap). ESXi should recognize drives connected to that ...


9

the 1400 means that at which speed the processor is running RIGHT now. 3000 is the Max cpu speed.


9

We've just ordered two Dell M910 blades with 4x Xeon X7560. That's Octo-Core 2.26Ghz. They cost close to 6 figures each and are the fastest Intel processors available on the market today. There is SO MUCH more to a processor than just clock speed. If I took just four of those 2.26Ghz cores and put them against a quad-socket P4 generation 2.8Ghz server I ...


9

There is a hardware limit of 96 endpoints on most Intel XHCI controllers. It wouldn't surprise me if each camera is using 8 endpoints, that's a pretty typical number for complex, modern devices. The hubs occupy endpoints as well. You can confirm this with USBView. This is a controller hardware limitation, and there's no way around it.


8

Let me get this straight. You upgraded the client based on a hunch and a single benchmark? That's a mistake. Benchmarks are entirely artificial and do not reflect how real world programs will perform. I will say that they do however provide an indication of potential performance. Firstly, there is a lot more to getting apps to perform well on multiple ...


8

Looks like VMware KB 1034926 specifically covers this. some Westmere micro-architecture processors that have AES/PCLMULQDQ features disabled are not permitted into Intel Westmere (Xeon 32nm Core i7) EVC clusters. If these features cannot be enabled in the BIOS, the host will only be admitted to the Intel Nehalem Generation mode or below. Hopefully the ...


8

533MHz is not possible on this gear. This is a problem with the interpretation of the CPU-Z results. Multiply that frequency by the data rate (2x or DDR), giving you 1066MHz. But 1066MHz isn't what you were expecting either!! For the rest of the setup, there are a few factors to consider. The DIMM population guidelines for the server are below. You have 18 ...


8

Make sure your client understands what they are asking for. It's very easy to find systems that match the specs you have given above, but almost certainly will be something they are quite unhappy with. Is your client aware that when Intel went to the Core architecture they increased the amount of work that can be done per clock, and reduced the clocks? I ...


8

What's your definition of "better"? Will it be faster? Probably. Will it require less power? Yes. Will it be more reliable? Maybe not. Even if a single SSD proves to be more reliable than a single standard hard drive (which is up for debate), your data is still not protected from a single-drive failure like it would be in a RAID1 scenario. Additionally, ...


8

Under Windows you might want to try CPU-Z. Under linux, you can try cat /proc/cpuinfo.


8

In old Compaq vernacular the number of CPU sockets was traditionally referred-to as "1-way" for single socket, "2-way" for dual socket, "4-way", etc. I suspect that you're looking at a machine with a single CPU socket.


7

OK, the previous answers have talked about why it's a bad idea to use fakeraid, why VMware doesn't support it, and to some extent why using a desktop motherboard isn't such a good idea. If you're really set on using this board as the base for a VMware server, this is what you do: Go to eBay. Search for DELL PERC 6/i. Buy one, preferably one that includes ...


7

In my experience using a 32 and 64 bit variants of FreeBSD on the same hardware, I have seen a measurable (but not huge) benefit to running 64 bit. 64 bit has been around long enough that active projects don't have issues. The one area this is not necessarily true is for compiled commercial apps (doesn't sound like an issue for your workload). If you were ...


6

It won't be the driver. It's most likely to be a physically shared component, such as interrupts or the PCI bus.


6

Sparc IV processors enjoy a supercomputer-like memory bus that has only been approached or equaled by the introduction of Core i7. As a result the are good at churning through large quantities of data (think database, large analysis) at a consistant rate. Actual Dhrystone benchmarks usually trail Intel. UltraSPARC-T1 processors plow through parallel ...


6

Intel vPro technology is a platform that requires specific ingredients - you need to have a vPro-capable processor and a vPro-capable motherboard. You can look up processors and boards on http://ark.intel.com and that site will tell you exactly which functionality is available on each component. One thing that I've learned about that site is that vPro ...


6

There is compatibility going beyond VMWare's HCL - a "whitebox HCL" has been assembled by the community listing a lot of components which ESX(i) has been found to work with. It also has something to say about software RAID controllers: this list includes a number of SATA controllers that provide RAID functionily via a software component in the ...


6

The x86_64 architecture has a few other advantages than just the memory space. The most imporant one is the increased number of registers, which allows the compiler to generate more efficient code. It's unlikely to make a big difference in the performance of your system though.


5

Implementation of OOB is not a trivial exercise by any stretch, and takes a significant amount of planning and investment. Simply turning on vPro is not enough, you have to have the back-end architecture to support it as well. Unless you are ready to immediately implement out-of-band management, my recommendation is to leave vPro turned off, because by ...


5

I wrestled with the same problem. My solution was to lock down the control panel and disable the Intel program. I disabled the Intel program with a startup script that ran a registry update: startup.bat: reg delete HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run /v IgfxTray /f


5

You should be able to ignore this - this is simply how CentOS labels its 64-bit packages, which work on both AMD and Intel processors that are 64-bit capable. Any quirky behavior would not be caused by this - there are no AMD or Intel specific packages in any Linux distribution, as far as I'm aware; just 32 or 64 bit


5

Check the max memory you can put in each system - it's possible that you may be able to stuff more RAM into a 2xdualcore box than you can into a 1xquadcore box. And more RAM will likely help.



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