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Does this mean that IBM owns everything in-between 9.0.0.0 and 9.255.255.255? Yes That's 3 octets a.k.a. 24 bits of freedom which means they own 2^24=16,777,216 addresses! Yep That seems like a lot for one company. There's no way they need that many, right? Correct


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On most of the networks I work with the router address is the first routable address (1, 129, and 193) in the subnet. This is by tradition, and not a requirement. Another option is to use the highest routeable address (126, 190, and 254) for the router. The lowest address in the each subnet (0, 128, and 192) is the network address and is not assigned. The ...


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Your root zone, as shown in the question, does not contain any delegation information for edu, only an A record. By this definition edu is not a zone of its own but just a name that is part of the root zone. To match your description of what you want, the edu A record should not be in the root zone, instead there should be delegatory NS records + glue ...


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After "Brute Forcing" the configuration (for the second time) I've managed to get this to work. The first time I tried to configure this every conceivable way I could think of, I didn't have the Virtual Interfaces assigned to the WAN interface. Apparently in Zentyal (an possibly the networking world entirely), the router/gateway/whatever it's called ...


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The problem is that you have three default routes. Since only one of the networks is connected to the internet, there should be only one default route. One of these three lines needs to stay and the others need to be removed. 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.1.1 192.168.1.17 10 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.2.1 192.168.2.51 ...


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Thanks David. To remove these entries from route table I have used: route change 0.0.0.0 MASK 0.0.0.0 10.112.29.253 metric 1 What I saw is, if I am executing this command, The metric value for this route is incremented by 1 and the other 2 default gateways are getting removed from the route table. Not sure why. If you can explain that would be great. ...


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Speaking for myself, we acquired a /26 block because 'we needed it' last year. Then we came to our senses and re-architected our SaaS product. Still have the block though - no reason to get rid of it - and frankly it's easier to have many. My last employer - not a small company had a handful and it was a constant PITA for the network guys having to juggle ...


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Those addresses are network addresses, which identify the specific network, and cannot be assigned to a host, which is what a router is. A router's interface must have a host address in order to identify that it is a member of that network and to know what interface to route traffic to.



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