New answers tagged

0

It would not surprise me at all if this is Dropbox. You have to stay awake long enough (not easy when reading most of what qualifies as cloud-related "news") to find this nugget in the article @ceejayoz linked to: Despite those accidents and everything else, Dropbox made its deadline. And it dropped those contracts with Amazon. The company continues to ...


2

The connections you see could simply be web pages employees are surfing that are run from or supported off of AWS or an employee is connecting to their own AWS servers. I have seen a lot where people want to learn about AWS and they do not limit their learning to off company work hours or the company's IT department hasn't met some need of theirs and they ...


2

I would say that a single connection of 30mpbs would be better for the following reasons: Less chance a high usage burst is going to fill the pipe during peak times. If one floor's usage capacity is much higher, it is more likely that the 15mbps would get saturated vs the 30mbps. Monitoring and Control - Unless you have hardware to terminate both ...


0

If it's two different ISP, it is better to have two different providers (reservation and balancing) than one.


1

Most people's Internet bandwidth is downstream. Your own router does not make the packet scheduling decisions for downstream traffic, it is the ISP's routers that do that. They will almost certainly have some form of QoS scheduling even if it's as basic as WRED. Without any scheduling, a router will operate FIFO (first in, first out) with tail drop. That ...


1

Quality of Service doesn't evenly distribute services based on the number of clients requesting the data, rather, it rations the bandwidth based on the services being requested. Example; one user is requesting Netflix, the other is just surfing web pages. If streaming video is higher on the list of priorities than HTML, then the first user's data will be ...


1

Can't believe this - the IP was actually null routed! If you have the same problem as me, make sure to check this in your provider's control panel...


0

I agree with everyone else that if you aren't allowing traffic to the server through your firewall there is nothing to worry about. If you want to use Windows Firewall to block it though you can create a new Inbound Rule (the default will block Edge Traversal), allow port 3389, and from there you can limit the external and internal subnets that are able to ...


2

Then the obvious answer is to disable outside access to your RDP port (typically 3389). This question is a bit surprising since the only ways it could be reached from the outside would be if the server was directly connected to the Internet (not firewalled), or if you had previously set a port forwarding rule in your firewall configuration.



Top 50 recent answers are included