Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

hdparm -T will essentially test the performance of reading disk caching, which is CPU and memory. This tests what read speeds you would get when files are cached in memory (see the cache section for the free command). The nearline SAS drives aren't full SAS drives. They have the same benefits as SAS drives as they use the SAS interface, but are still ...


3

6 Gbs is the speed of the SAS link, not the IO profile of a single disk. Typically the speed in a SAS backplane will be negotiated down to the lowest common denominator so you'll find slow disks that still support high-speed SAS links to allow you to mix disks in a single (external) enclosure or backplane, or to benefit from parallelised IO spread out ...


1

You can change the default scheduler for all disks by adding the following to your kernel command line, which can be found in /boot/grub/menu.lst: elevator={SCHEDULER-NAME}


1

You simply have to create a file in /etc/systemd/system/io-scheduler.service with the following content: [Unit] Description=I/O Scheduler Setter After=local-fs.target [Service] Type=oneshot ExecStart=/bin/bash -c 'echo noop > /sys/block/sda/queue/scheduler' TimeoutSec=0 RemainAfterExit=yes [Install] WantedBy=multi-user.target Then, enable the service ...


5

The tuned and tuned-utils pacakages are available for Fedora (they are also in Red Hat). This is a system service that can apply predefined or user-defined system profiles and tuneables on-the-fly, including mount options, disk schedulers, sysctl parameters, etc. Many Liinux admins overlook these settings. See the Fedora 20 Manual: ...



Top 50 recent answers are included