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0

There are some tools you can use. One is the database maintained by Team Cymru. You can reach it (for example) by DNS: % dig +short 8.8.8.8.origin.asn.cymru.com TXT "15169 | 8.8.8.0/24 | US | arin |" Note: you need to specify the IP in reverse notation, so to lookup IP address 1.2.3.4 you need to request: % dig +short 4.3.2.1.origin.asn.cymru.com TXT ...


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Just curl this page: $ curl wtfismyip.com/text


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The SNAT target is only meaningful in the POSTROUTING chain of the nat table. A valid version of your rule would be : iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o em1 -p tcp --dport 25 -j SNAT --to-source 192.168.2.253 By the way if your (output) interface holds the IP 192.168.2.253, then rather use : iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o em1 -p tcp --dport 25 -j ...


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To add a NAT rule you need to do so in the NAT table; add "-t nat" to the iptables command line. Further, you can only do SNAT on the INPUT NAT chain (not OUTPUT), and on an inbound interface (-i, not -o). You will obviously have to alter which interface that is, to the one where the packet is arriving, not the one where it is leaving


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An SSL certificate depends on the IP address of host too, right (besides the hostname)? No, only the Hostname ("DNS-Name") is relevant for a X.509 certificate and the Application Layer. Such a certificate has a field called Common Name (CN) which holds the domain name (which also apprears in the address bar of your browser). The browser validates the ...


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As an alternative approach you could use something as simple as fail2ban. It institutes a timeout for successive failed login attempts and makes bruteforcing infeasible since they only get a few chances per timeout. I set my time out length to 30 minutes. By the time they're an hour or two in, they realize they won't be able to make any headway and give up.


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The following command with nmap with root privilegies (or using sudo): sudo nmap -sP 172.31.201.0/24 | awk '/Nmap scan report for/{printf $5;}/MAC Address:/{print " => "$3;}' | sort results in: 172.31.201.80 => 00:50:56:AF:56:FB 172.31.201.97 => 00:26:73:78:51:42 server1.company.internal.local => 3C:D9:2B:70:BC:99 ...


-3

as given - any block of IP address is 182.44.82.16/26 where /26 define the Prefix and to find First addr and Last addr you should know these formula: First addrs = any IP addrs AND Netmask Last addrs = any IP addrs OR ( ! Netmask ) to find Netmask :- as u given the Prefix is /26 that means 26 1's there Netmask = 11111111 11111111 1111111 11000000 ...



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