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According to the listed authoritative servers for abacushub.io, the specified subdomain does not actually exist: % dig +norec @ns3.iwantmyname.net. ifodgw.abacushub.io ; <<>> DiG 9.8.3-P1 <<>> +norec @ns3.iwantmyname.net. ifodgw.abacushub.io ; (2 servers found) ;; global options: +cmd ;; Got answer: ;; ->>HEADER<<- ...


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For this to be possible, you would need a valid SSL certificate for 111.111.11.111, which is unlikely, see also Is it possible to have SSL certificate for IP address, not domain name?. What you probably want to do is: Create a VirtualHost entry matching 111.111.11.111 as ServerName, but not using https, but http instead. Redirect that to your domain. ...


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Yes, DHCP requests are broadcast requests. If the host wanting a DHCP address is on a different subnet then you need to configure an IP Helper address. The IP helper address will forward the DHCP request using unicast to the DHCP server.


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Azure reserves some IP addresses within each subnet. The first and last IP addresses of the subnets are reserved for protocol conformance, along with 3 more addresses used for Azure services. So 5 adresses that you cannot use in your VNet So in your case, 16-6-5= 5 available addresses Additional info : ...


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/28 gives you 4 bits for your network addresses. The first address is the network address, the last one is the broadcast address. So you technically have 16 addresses, 14 of which can be used. A subnet that provides addresses for 14 hosts needs to be a /28 network. So to hold at least 3 of these subnets you need a /26 network. 00001010 10010000 00011010 ...


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I would setup apache on port 80 and add a VirtualHost for gitlab.mydomain.com . Then setup that VirtualHost with mod_proxy to http://127.0.0.1:8080 . Finally, setup gitlab to listen on 127.0.0.1. Found an example for you on GitHub: https://gist.github.com/radmen/3689615


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Yes you can, editting /etc/hosts like this: 192.168.0.10 example.com.local That file is where it checks first when you are trying to resolve any hostname, then it goes ahead and uses DNS servers. I'm saying this so you are aware that, for example, if you add 1.2.3.4 google.com to /etc/hosts, you wont be able to get to the real google.com


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Hetzner have stopped assigning public IPv4 addresses to virtual servers. As far as I can tell this change happened when they changed the product name from VQ to CX. The usage of NAT is not mentioned in the product description though. Virtual servers ordered in 2012 and 2013 still have their public IPv4 address today. But virtual servers ordered in 2016 only ...


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The PTR record will need to be set at OVH, however, before being able to do that, you will need to create an A record at CloudFlare for the servers hostname and set that record to not pass through CloudFlare. Say, for example, if your server name is server.domain.com, do the following: In CloudFlare, create an A record for server.domain.com with the IP of ...


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You should make httpd service to start automatically on system reboot to avoid such failures. on Redhat/Fedora: chkconfig --add httpd On Ubuntu/Debian: sudo update-rc.d apache2 defaults


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Don't use the current IP address in your code. It is standard practice to listen on '0.0.0.0' which will listen on all available servers. You can add the ability to set the listen address from a configuration file and/or the command line. That should solve the issue of having to modify the code every time you change networks. Getting a static IP address ...


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You need to configure the other IP addresses on this host system. You can do by adding relevant configuration lines in /etc/network/interfaces file like below. auto eth0:0 iface eth0:0 inet static address X.X.X.149 netmask 255.255.255.248 network X.X.X.144 broadcast X.X.X.151 You should add these lines for all IP addresses you want to use, ...



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