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4

The way to do this (for any equipment) is recognize that the MAC address of the camera is static even if the IP is not, and to act on the DHCP server. It may be possible for the DHCP server to update DNS with the new IP address, recognizing the equipment either by MAC or some more complicated protocol with a login/password. I would probably not recommend ...


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It's actually super simple. Try something like: DEVICE=eth0 BOOTPROTO=static IPADDR=164.132.193.xxx IPADDR2=91.134.28.xxx IPADDR3=91.134.158.xxx NETMASK=255.255.255.0 ONBOOT=yes GATEWAY=164.132.192.1


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In the end, we decided to use the git method, and changing IPs was the least of our troubles. :) The procedure: Use Puppet to install and set up etckeeper, and create a repo for each server on our Gitlab instance. We chose to use a gitignore that ignored everything except select files and directories. Have team members create a branch (with a common ...


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had the same question and found Zoredache pointing to TRACE / ipt_LOG was the solution! Additionally I found a script which inserts/removes LOG-rules preceding all currently active iptables rules. I tried it out and found it to be a really nice tool. - Output is similar to the TRACE solution - Advantage: it works on the active iptables configuration, no ...


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you need to edit your /etc/network/interfaces to add a new ip address to your interface like so auto eth0 iface eth0 inet static address 192.168.0.42 network 192.168.0.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 broadcast 192.168.0.255 gateway 192.168.0.1 That said if you dont know where to be adding new ips to a ...


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10.0.1.1/24 is a private address on your LAN. 70.88.182.1/24 looks like a public-facing address. It looks like you're trying to route your traffic internally and externally at the same time. If your router is a 10.0.1.1/24 (as noted by the netmask 255.255.255.0) everything else needs to be on the same subnet to connect, unless you have a vlan set up (very ...


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nmap is the starting place for this endeavor. nmap tends to get slow for me when I start getting beyond a threshold of targets (ports x ips), so staying within your own shell, you could break into ranges and fork those off to processes, and have each redirect their output to a file, database, etc. For the truely huge dataset, you might consider something ...


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The MASQUERADE of the iptables plus the /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward = 1 does the magic. And the matching condition for the -o $EXTIF comes from your routes. You should have one route add default gw x.x.x.x $EXTIF The x.x.x.x should be the inside IP (LAN) of your internet router. With that default gateway the kernel knows the packet it received it's not ...



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