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9

Now the problem is apparent. Your network interface has the wrong prefix set. It is set to /8 (or in the old netmask notation, 255.0.0.0), which tells your operating system that every address in the 104.0.0.0 through 104.255.255.255 inclusive is on the same LAN as your VPS. This obviously is not the case. Most of this range is subdivided into very small ...


4

The first reply you get is from the device you are pinging from and is probably because of an ARP lookup going on which makes the first ping timeout.


4

On windows server OS's after WinNT 4.0 SP3, this information is coming up by design. The Winsock applications on your machine are listening (waiting for information) from those ports. 0.0.0.0 means 'all addresses' This will come up wether you are connected to the internet or not. Think about it like this: a person has earphones in their ears, but no music ...


4

This does not look Powershell-related at all. Instead, it looks like your network (after 192.168.160.2) is filtering at least the ICMP Time exceeded responses, which is what tracert / traceroute relies upon to generate the routing path trace. It does not matter what traceroute implementation you are using or how you tweak the parameters of the call - your ...


2

Try to add this line in /etc/network/interfaces pre-down ip route change default via 10.255.255.1 dev eth0 src 82.82.82.82


2

You use port forwarding on your router so that any traffic originated from the outside to your public address to a particular port number gets forwarded to the IP address of the server. For a web server, you would forward ports 80 and 443 to your web server's IP address.


2

AWS has a feature called VPC Flow Log that captures all the traffic coming to a VPC or a particular subnet or a particular network interface. You can setup VPC Flow log and these logs are then populated to AWS CloudWatch. It gives a very descriptive Log information and you can filter your query from that. Check more on AWS VPC Flow Log


2

Most likely you cannot : the typical situation is that your server is on a private subnet behind the firewall, and any outbound traffic to the Internet (such as a "What's My IP" site) is NATed on the firewall to the latter's public IP Address. The website has no way of knowing what your server's original IP was.


2

Looks like packets from 'some_problem_place' are not reaching your webserver at all. You can debug this using tcpdump (i assume that you know outer network interface on your webserver): On server run sudo tcpdump -ni "outer inferface" src host "IP of some_problem_place" . For example: sudo tcpdump -ni eth0 src host 11.22.33.44 On client try to access your ...


2

Well, if your application works for your clients, it works. If it doesn't, it doesn't. That's about all there is to it, unless they have some sort of L7-aware "fuzzy" matching going on that may permit some traffic to your app and deny other traffic, in which case the network team needs to be involved. If your clients want to use your application, the onus ...


1

The only way I have been able to achieve this is by using NAT. Something like this: iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o eth0 -j SNAT --to 1.2.3.4 where 1.2.3.4 is one of your alias IPs. Doing this flips all outgoing traffic to use this IP address, for everything (so be careful). You may wish to consider this variant: iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o eth0 ...


1

I probably misunderstood something but to set static IP you do not need to disable DHCP from the router. Add to the server as many ipv4 ip as you want by going to its advanced settings. I do not even think you'd need to have groups, I'd only use 1 lan for everything (since a router is not a firewall, so I'd not push it too far). Your server would have all ...


1

There are netmasks that can be defined in dotted notation that can't be defined in CIDR notation. You should avoid using non CIDR netmasks in real life. Example is: 10.0.0.0 255.254.255.0 Note that there's a bit flipped in the second octet. This turns into two ranges of ip addresses that's defined in a single network + subnet. If I can find a pencil ...


1

This can most certainly be done utilising Virtual Hosts. Domain1.com could use the original web root folder and vhost file. If you do not wish to do this, you can repeat the steps below for domain1 as well as 2.` Steps (ubuntu 14.04): sudo cp /etc/nginx/sites-available/default /etc/nginx/sites-available/example.com sudo nano ...


1

I think you will not be able to do this without separating all your boards so they don't see each other. Fortunately, you don't need to physically separate them, there is a solution that allows you to achieve this logically. To give you an idea of what is needed: You need a managed switch, where you configure a different VLAN on each port you will connect ...


1

If you want to see dropped traffic you'll need to do the whitelist using a firewall running on your EC2 instance, not the AWS infrastructure. (Your server cannot log/see traffic that it doesn't receive). You may want to look into something like Fail2Ban. A word of advice, there are bot nets that will try to connect to your IP (especially on EC2) via SSH ...


1

Azure's load balancer does not support PING (ICMP), which is why you cannot ping your VM's IP address. You can use tcp-based ping tools to achieve this. Note: You will be able to ping between VMs internally (via each VM's internal IP address), assuming they're deployed into the same vnet / cloud service. You can absolutely access your VM by IP address ...


1

I am assuming you are talking about a private IP address (192.168.x.x) Which is only accessible when you are on the private IP's LAN this would be the reason you are not able to access the webpage from your school



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