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5

You want network address translation (NAT) for your LAN: source NAT for your clients, destination NAT for your servers. Your LAN firewall probably provides this capability. Then, you need to configure your firewall to forward ports 80 and/or 443 from the external IP address to your server's LAN IP address.


5

I'm assuming that you want to RDP to it so that you can change it's ip address? If yes, then you can try this: Temporarily assign your workstation an ip address in the same 172.18.2.x range, then RDP to the machine, then change the ip address to match your new ip address range, then change your workstation ip address back to what it was.


4

The entry in /etc/sysconfig/network is where RHEL (and derivatives such as CentOS) set the hostname/nodename that you'll see reflected on for instance the prompt of your shell, in system and log messages etc. That is the hostname that will be returned by the gethostname(2) and uname system calls. A system only has one hostname/nodename, but it can have ...


3

The lowest address is possibly less encumbered, since it's normally assigned as the gateway/router for that network, where as the highest would be used for broadcast traffic to every machine in the network. I've never tried to assign a broadcast address (as a unicast address) to a machine specifically, you might end up seeing a lot of odd traffic. If you're ...


2

Are there any gotchas to using the highest and the lowest IP in a block like this? It depends on how the network outside your server(s) is configured. I find it not very likely they could have divided a block of, say, 256 addresses into 64 subnets of 4 addresses each, mainly because this would waste 50% of the available addresses, up to 75% if a router ...


2

You just need to create 3 different A records in your DNS service pointing the domain or subdomains to the different ip addresses and then in apache create 3 different virtual hosts (one per domain/subdomain) bound each to its respective ip. A reason to do this would be to use https, otherwise it's not needed in general since you can serve multiple domains ...


2

The two possible solutions I can think of are: Split the network into segments. You can use VLAN tagging to run two different segments on one physical network. Then you hand out two different ranges of IP addresses with DHCP, and use one or more routers to rout traffic between the segments. Put a DHCP relay on each AP and have the AP block the DHCP request ...


2

You never need to add additional IP addresses to the local host on any operating system (Unix like, Windows, whatever). They will all respond by default, without additional configuration, to all IP addresses from 127.0.0.0/8: $ ping 127.254.0.100 PING 127.254.0.100 (127.254.0.100) 56(84) bytes of data. 64 bytes from 127.254.0.100: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 ...


1

I'm assuming this is behind a NATed connection. In that case, you need to enable NAT reflection to allow internal traffic to the external IP address your site resolves to. Most routers don't have this enabled by default and many consumer firewalls don't even support it in their out-of-box firmware. Without this feature, packets from the LAN to your WAN ...


1

It seems like that: Router's autoconfiguration created redirection rule only for external interfaces. You try to connect to the ext ip of the router. Packet appears on its local interface destinated to ext ip. Router sees, that destination ip is belonging to it, it sees, that it have 80 port opened (with router config site), so it passes packet to it's own ...


1

You can use the instance metadata documented here http://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/AESDG-chapter-instancedata.html below I wrote a simple piece of java code which prints the running instance-id import java.net.URL; import java.net.URLConnection; import java.util.Scanner; public final class Main { public static void main(String[] args) ...


1

The machine name is largely arbitrary and irrelevant to your quest in working why you can't access a particular domian name. In this case we can make an educated guess that the domain is going through a server belonging to "tinet.net" in Los Angeles. The IPv4 implies their network may have different routers for IPv4 and IPv6 (which may or may not be true) ...



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