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1

MAC addresses reside and operate at Layer 2 of the OSI networking model. Routing occurs at Layer 3 of the OSI networking model. In the strictest sense, routing isn't performed by way of the MAC address, because routing occurs at Layer 3 while MAC addresses operate at Layer 2. That being said, and using a very simple example, when a local host needs to ...


1

You have 2 options: Use a bigger subnet (e.g. instead of /24 use a /23) Add another VLAN and configure the router/firewall to forward required traffic. Solution 1: You will need to change the network mask on all machines connected on the current VLAN. Because you are using only a slice of 192.168.0.0/16, you can grow your VLAN to have a maximum of 65534 ...


0

Of course. There are only 4 billion IP addresses and if address once used, could not be used again, we would have run out those a long time ago. On some networks, you get new address every time you connect. And you can even get address that was vacated just seconds ago. ISPs keep record of who used what address at what time. So when tracing someone back, ...


0

If you have services running on your public IP addresses, AND you want to provide services on both ISP lines simultaneously from the same machine (or through the same firewall), you cannot do so without source IP address-based policy routing. That's because the same client coming from the Internet can connect to those services presented on different IP ...


3

This is by design, the entire 127.X.X.X address range is reserved for loopback, as defined in RFC1700: http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc1700.txt This is discussed a little more here: why is loopback IP address from 127.0.0.1 to 127.255.255.254? Just because MPLS uses it internally (For whatever reason), that doesn't mean a target server can listen on it and ...


2

You can have all the services resolve to a single IP, then use port forwarding to direct the traffic to the appropriate server. This is a commonly used solution. If you are running an email server you should either get a fixed IP address, or use your provider's relay for outgoing email. You wouldn't need a DDNS solution in this case. Many providers ...


0

Since osx is nix based the commands are similar. sudo route add -host 192.168.1.3 -interface en0 I would then set en0 to a netmask of 255.255.255.255 so no trafic will route through it unless it is going to the static route for the other ip.


0

as @ceejayoz mentioned, iptables can do the redirection on layer 3/4, however, if you are serving up a tcp protocol, such as http, you could use haproxy or nginx to redirect on layer 7, and that would allow you more fine-grained control (ie. url rewriting, etc)


0

There is a default virtual host defined in your httpd.conf that will handle web requests on the IP address itself. It will appear first in the list of VirtualHost's and the ServerName tag is typically set to the server IP address rather than a domain name. Example: <VirtualHost 104.37.179.4:80> ServerName 104.37.179.4 DocumentRoot ...


0

auditd to the rescue: ausearch -m USER_AUTH yields (among others): type=USER_AUTH msg=audit(1435161396.088:342): pid=17550 uid=0 auid=4294967295 ses=4294967295 subj=system_u:system_r:sshd_t:s0-s0:c0.c1023 msg='op=success acct="root" exe="/usr/sbin/sshd" hostname=? addr=10.0.0.x terminal=ssh res=success


0

You can use the command "last" which will show users who logged into the server, ip address, and date. http://linux.die.net/man/1/last


0

The solution was, based on @CraigWatson answer, the next configuration on GoDaddy DNS Zone File of the danigarcia-dev.com domain: Create a CNAME record with: www as the Host ec2-52-26-205-227.us-west-2.compute.amazonaws.com as the Points to A forwarding to the www.danigarcia-dev.com web address


-2

You should go and re-read the wikipedia article for subnetting. A basic grasp of IPv4 addresses will help you more with your homework than just copying answers off here. You didn't explicitly state it in the question, but I'll assume you have a /24 network and want to divide it into one 1x /25 and 2x /26 So you end up with 134.7.1.0/25, 134.7.1.128/26 and ...


0

You most likely have set your domain up for web forwarding rather than DNS redirection. To get redirection without URL rewriting, you'll need to point your domain apex to your EC2 instance using a CNAME record. So, using the GoDaddy documentation, create a CNAME record with @ as the Host, and ec2-52-26-205-227.us-west-2.compute.amazonaws.com as the Points ...


0

I'm not familiar with LXC or how devices are shared between host and container, however using iptables you can forward traffic from one interface to another like so; iptables -A FORWARD -i eth0 -o eth1 -j ACCEPT Don't know if that helps you any.


0

This is impossible. Ok, not impossible, but to do it, you would need to brute-force iterate through the entire DNS name space. Needless to say, this would be very expensive and very time consuming. Additionally, DNS is non-deterministic. Due to round-robin and other load balancing methods, just because you query a record once does not mean you have ...


1

Maybe LoadImpact thinks /13 is too big to whitelist. A work-around may be to whitelist the network in parts: 54.80.0.0/16 54.81.0.0/16 54.82.0.0/16 54.83.0.0/16 54.84.0.0/16 54.85.0.0/16 54.86.0.0/16 54.87.0.0/16


-1

I would really, really urge you to not put your ESXi management interface on the Internet directly. Your only security control is then your password, which gives you full keys to the kingdom. I would suggest that you install a Unified Threat Manager (UTM) like pfsense or Untangle to be your router with a public IP address. Your network would look like this: ...


4

Your hosting provider (Hetzner, at a guess?) is correct. You will need to assign the single static IP address to your VMware server's VMK interface. This will allow you to connect to the server via the VMware console and create VMs. Your hosting provider should be able to route your /29 subnet to the server's MAC address. You will also have a single ...


0

Assigning the same IP address to the wireless and ethernet will NOT work (and may break things). A tunnel is your best bet. There's no native OS or 802.1/802.11 support for this sort of thing. Industry is working on seamless multi-mode roaming but it is not possible on stock networking stacks today: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multipath_TCP There are ...


0

The keyword you are looking for is bonding see wikipedia. I'm not sure if macs have this. This stackoverflow article says no (in 2014) for wifi and ethernet, only for ethernet and ethernet.


1

Add this to your ~/.ssh/config Host special HostName special.myjob.com Port 22000 User fooey Now you can just run: ssh special to get ssh -p 22000 fooey@special.myjob.com More ssh tips at: http://nerderati.com/2011/03/17/simplify-your-life-with-an-ssh-config-file/


2

v6 in your output is short for IPv6. IPv6 is the new Internet Protocol, which was introduced in 1998 to replace the aging IPv4.


1

I guess this can be done in 3 ways: Install and configure Routing and Remote Access and configure a NAT rule on the device Configure a NAT rule on the upstream router Configure a static ARP entry on the server pointing 2.2.2.2 to the servers existing mac address


0

If you want to retain the IP address so you don't have to do the wide scale application change you mentioned, you can enable IP forwarding and then do forwarding of the traffic at the IP level rather than via proxying (see http://www.debuntu.org/how-to-redirecting-network-traffic-to-a-new-ip-using-iptables/ for an example). If using Windows, check out ...


-4

You should use a reverse proxy and not a webserver to do so, try to install nginx (which does both reverse proxy and webserver). It will allow you to do exactly what you want, by, basicly instead of configuring a filesystem path, you will configure a network path (Your application server).


2

There is little difference between allowing connections to ssh from any IP and allowing connections to ssh from any IP for a given user as the user authentication has to happen after the connection - ie, after it's already let the originator connect. You certainly should be restricting direct ssh access for servers that don't need it in general regardless of ...


0

Never mind, unfortunately, the only computer which the server is not able to see via the IPV4 addresses is my own work-station! For my workstation, the server--which is a VMWARE VM running on the workstation, the server finds that as the IPV6 addresses. While I do need to make my workstation to be in the list of exceptions, at least I know why the problem ...


1

Set up your own VPN server hosted in London (take a look at OpenVPN Access Server - it's free version will suit your needs), this, however, requires some administartion skills. Or just buy a VPN service from a provider that has exit nodes in London and has client for MacOS X.


0

Here is a Microsoft TechNet article showing how to add a binding. Just do the opposite to remove. For SSL only websites, why not redirect the requests? Or you could require SSL for a website.


0

I don't know about "in Splunk", but the conversion is easy - take two hex digits for each octet, put dots between them, convert each pair to decimal. Many languages have a conversion function, otherwise for a one-off use http://www.binaryhexconverter.com/hex-to-decimal-converter. e.g. C0A8FE01 -> C0.A8.FE.01 -> 192.A8.FE.01 -> 192.168.FE.01 -> ...


1

There are a number of scenarios for each case, but I'm going to list just one for each: You'd add a secondary ip address when you want to communicate with devices that are on the same Layer 2 network but on a different Layer 3 network (devices that are connected to the same physical network but are using a different ip address range/subnet). You'd add a ...


3

Depends whether your ISP is a LIR or not. When they are they can get the IPs in ranges at their local RIR (RIPE, ARIN, etc.). They pay a yearly fee depending on the amount of IPs they have. If they are not a LIR, they probably use ranges owned by another LIR. You cannot create your own IPs. You can however use internal ranges (not accessible from the ...


0

If I understand you correctly you want your outgoing traffic to pass through multiple of your network interfaces in a round robin fashion? If that's the case, and you're in a Linux environment, you should be able to use iproute2 and just change your default route. Please have a look at this previous question for more information and an example.



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