Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Quite simply, that appears to be what the PTR record is configured to point to. Took a look at mxtoolbox as well and it concurs that it is indeed the returned record. My guess is it is a default setting for the IP's in that range as .78, and .77 also return localhost. Unless you are specifically trying to do reverse lookups on the IP for some need (In ...


0

Did you have a look at http redirection? Sound like you want to view server B via server A website, correct? Take a look here:http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.4/rewrite/remapping.html


0

Your static routes are invalid. You need to delete all your static routes from both sites and add the following routes on each router: Run on SITE2: /ip route add dst-address=192.168.3.0/24 gateway=172.30.2.222 Run on SITE3: /ip route add dst-address=192.168.2.0/24 gateway=172.30.2.221 Also the bridges are unnecessary so delete them too. You sould also ...


0

No, you cannot prevent a DDoS attack that way. By the time the packets reach your server they have already consumed capacity on the saturated link. Dropping a packet with iptables is not going to give you back the link-time which has already been used. In order for a measure against a DDoS attack to be effective it has to block packets before they enter ...


0

My question is, when is the DNS lookup performed by clients to resolve the new IP for OpenVPN When the connection is first established. how can I trigger a lookup to make clients use the new IP? This varies depending on OS. If your users are using OSX, for example, $ dscacheutil -flushcache will flush the local cache. Other OSes have similar ...


0

Amazon VPC's network infrastructure assumes that all of the address space in the supernet associated with the VPC will be inside the VPC, associated with instance interfaces. Your VPN, being on the "other side" of one instance, isn't "inside" the VPC. As such, you can't provision your VPN to use any subnet within the VPC's address block, if you want your ...


0

This is my fiorst post, so bear with me, Depending on the severity of the attack and determination of the attacker you can slow them down but never think of "stopping" them, an attack can be slowed down but not stopped. IPtables is a good solution, depending on the source traffic to your website I always use country restrictions if I'm not willing to deal ...


1

The attacker could then just start attacking the other IP as well if they weren't already doing so. You might block some unsophisticated attacks, but not anyone who's even moderately determined. If your goal is to prevent DoS and not DDoS, you can look in to using mod_qos or iptables to limit total concurrent connections from a single IP. You can also ...


5

That's an IPv6 address. You can have him Google "what is my ip" (no quotes) and tell you what it reports and see if it gives a normal IPv4 address like you're expecting. Another site he can visit to get it is http://whatismyip.akamai.com


0

Its odd that removing the binding for port 80 in IIS did not do the trick. I ended up blocking port 80 in the Windows Firewall as a work-around.


2

ColdFusion is a platform/language. It is not in and of itself a web server, application layer protocol or network protocol. ColdFusion based websites run on whatever TCP port the website itself is running on, typically ports 80 or 443. HTTP/HTTPS operate at the application layer over TCP, not UDP.


1

That means that the 192.168.1.1 address is associated with a 240.0.0.0 mask. You have to think binary to understand that. In binary your IP address would be: 11000000.10101000.00000001.00000001 In the same way /4 represent the number of "1" bits in the mask. So here the mask is 11110000.00000000.00000000.00000000 (which is 240.0.0.0 in decimal) /8 would ...


1

Amazon's CloudFront CDN lets you serve dynamic content, and I'd recommend going that route because just because you have a presence in a particular country, doesn't mean you have a great network route to all the users there, and a good CDN tries to ensure that's the case. See http://aws.amazon.com/cloudfront/dynamic-content/ if you want to learn more about ...


2

It's not just American users, it can be users from any country. And there are several reasons it can happen. Users traveling abroad and logging on from there would get reported as being users from that country. international companies often have IP blocks from one country only and assign those addresses to all their offices. same for ISPs operating in ...


20

Maxmind is a good service, though occasionally there can be errors, since we're now in the time period where IPv4 blocks are scarce, and are being traded and resold on a gray market. If you do find an actual error you can report it to them, though this doesn't appear to be an error. This is basically how I confirm the location of an IP address: First, I'll ...


0

This might require some web server reconfiguration. But you can configure your https virtual hosts to use different local private ip addresses and have a reverse proxy ssl server like Nginx to handle all incoming https connections. This is how I overcame this exact limitation. https://www.rubysecurity.org/nginx_reverse_ssl-proxy


-1

Yes, you need a dedicated IP address if you want your users to browse your site using any browser on any OS. If you use something which is called SNI (Server Name Indication) then you don't need a dedicated IP address for each SSL certificate, but not all browsers support SNI. It's the same thing CloudFlare is providing with free SSL certificates for their ...


11

If you can safely limit the supported clients of your service to systems supporting Server Name Indication, having only one IP address should be sufficient. See this article for a list of supported clients.


1

Views and RPZ allow you to define static responses based on characteristics of the packet source/destination (views), query itself, or upstream authoritative server (RPZ). The operative word here is static. The packet headers and queries change, but the replies are always pre-defined and static. What you're looking for is a form of on the fly response ...


-2

The Chinese are scanning / attacking everything, everywhere. For the sites I run, I don't want any Chinese or African traffic - there's no reason for it, and so I consider any hits from there as an attack. To accomplish the ban, I created a table to store IPs that hit the sites, and a php script that uses the geoplugin API to identify the origin of the IP. ...


0

Assuming the public IP address is available on the machine hosting the service, the issue is likely one of configuration, you mention the server.port option, what is server.address configured to? It should probably be 0.0.0.0. I should also mention, your firewall there isn't doing much firewalling, you should change your INPUT chain policy to DROP, that way ...


1

Resolution was to access the system logs of the machine which currently had that IP. It was an OSX machine and I was able to grep 'IP ADDRESS' /var/log/* /dev/null to find a log file which held historical IP information. I found that it was held in /var/log/daily.out and I was able to confirm the machine which currently held that IP had also had the same IP ...


3

You say the IP has changed, which sounds like you may be using DHCP to assign addresses? Check the DHCP log files C:\Windows\system32\dhcp. Use the time and the IP to find the MAC address, then use your inventory system to track down that asset. https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd183591%28v=ws.10%29.aspx


0

Are you performing this configuration from within RRAS? I would like to duplicate the steps you are trying and go from there.



Top 50 recent answers are included