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10

Yes, precisely so. The globally-scoped address is the one you advertise to the world (which in this case, means list in your AAAA record). The link-scoped address is a very useful feature of ipv6 which makes setting up point-to-point links elegant, but it isn't, as you say, globally-routable, and advertising it to the world will not get you any visitors. ...


9

If the ccTLD does not have IPv6 addresses for its name servers, an IPv6-only user may not be able to resolve any names under that TLD, even if those names are in IPv6-competent zones. Resolving follows a chain down from root, and if one link doesn't work, the entire thing fails. DNSSEC provides cryptographic authentication of DNS data. Like everything in ...


5

AAAA records can be delivered by both IPv4 and IPv6 resolvers. You can add IPv6 addresses to your domain and they will be delivered. People with IPv6 only resolvers (which I believe would be relatively rare) won't be able to resolve your domain in any case. The standard work-around for DNSSEC is to use DLV (DNSSEC Lookaside Validation). This has been ...


4

If the TLD doesn't support AAAA records for the nameserver addresses that doesn't mean you can't have AAAA records for your underlying services, it just means that people won't be able to use IPv6 for the DNS protocol itself to lookup your service addresses. It's a perfectly normal configuration (see BCP 91 aka RFC 3901) to only have IPv4-only nameservers ...


4

A Modestly Pragmatic (but admittedly less precise or permanent) Guide: If you find yourself in the above pickle and for whatever reason HAVE to proceed with the TLDs in question... (A) No IPv6 support for TLD As of this post (Jan/2016), IPv4 is far from deprecated, so any practical impact to general discoverability should be minimal. But because of the ...


4

There is no difference. The second ends in a dot. Using this method, the PTR record is defined explicitly without taking into consideration the context of the zone the record is residing in. Or rather, the dot suppresses the zone from being appended on the end. The first case is missing the dot at the end so the zone the record is defined in is ...


4

When Red Hat's networking scripts set multiple IPv6 addresses configured in /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-*, for whatever reason, they are applied in reverse order, so that the last address listed in IPV6ADDR_SECONDARIES becomes the address used by default for outgoing connections. Reversing the order in which IPv6 addresses are listed is generally ...


3

Having spent some time on this it seems that the Apache documentation could be misleading, although I may have missed something. It says IPv6 addresses must be enclosed in square brackets. This is true for non link-local addresses. But I have now discovered that link-local addresses can be used, and must include a scope id, but without the square brackets. ...


2

Problem was in not having the source address in /etc/hosts.allow.


2

1) Why do some hosts get one and some hosts more addresses? I've see this happen more often. IPv6 hosts always get a link-local address. The other addresses depend on a combination of the flags in the RA and the host settings. The RA can signal to the host that a DHCPv6 server might hand out addresses, which the host can act upon. If the RA contains ...


1

Apparently, DNSMasq not setting on-link is a bug that is fixed in 2.63, just too new for Debian 7. Need to upgrade to Debian 8 anyway, so doing that today. Edit, upgrade complete. The DNSmasq config line was changed to: dhcp-range=::,ra-only,constructor:eth1,infinite Now the route for the local subnet is added.


1

Unfortunately tc does not work yet for IPv6. Quote: The Routing Policy Database (RPDB) replaced the IPv4 routing and addressing structure within the Linux Kernel which lead to all the wonderful features this HOWTO describes. Unfortunately, the IPv6 structure within Linux was implemented outside of this core structure. Although they do share some ...


1

A link prefix is used between your router and your ISP. The routed prefix is used inside your network. If you receive a /64 routed prefix from your ISP, then you would simply have your router advertise that prefix on your LAN. If you got a prefix smaller than /64 (perhaps a /48?) you should consider how to subnet that prefix in a logical way, to be used ...


1

I know this means that I won't be able to add an AAAA record to the domain, This is wrong. The incompetance of the domain registry has no bearing on the record types you can use (unless they force you to use their servers as the authoritative namesevers in which case I would suggest running far away). but what does this mean for ...



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