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5

IPv6 usually uses a /64 per subnet. Routers send a Router Advertisement or RA to the LAN. This RA contains the basic settings for the LAN like which prefixes (often a single /64) to use, whether the router can be used as a default gateway, whether hosts are allowed to auto-configure themselves and whether there is a DHCPv6 server on the LAN (and what kind of ...


4

Each broadcast domain gets a /64. If you have your hosts isolated, so that there should only be one per subnet, you can assign a whole /64 for a single host. This is mostly used for servers, where you use static IP assignements anyway. If you see the need for SLAAC or stateful DHCPv6, you probably should assign a /64 for a whole network segment, not a single ...


3

The fdee:... addresses are part of the Unique Local Unicast allocation (fc00::/7). These addresses are called Unique Local IPv6 Unicast Addresses and are abbreviated in this document as Local IPv6 addresses. They are not expected to be routable on the global Internet. They are routable inside of a more limited area such as a site. ...


3

In Puppet Enterprise the puppetmaster should be listening on a dual stack IPv6/IPv4 socket by default. Though PE has some other IPv6-related brokenness (my site) you'll have to work around. In open source Puppet, such as you may have obtained via EPEL, you need to set the bindaddress explicitly in the [main] section of /etc/puppet/puppet.conf: [main] ...


3

Well, first off, relying on MAC addresses as identifying information is not a good idea - they can be trivially changed by the user. Regarding SLAAC, as you've found out, it's very much not suited for an environment that you need control over. As such, consider switching to DHCPv6. Once you've switched to DHCP, the solution to your MAC address problem is ...


2

All TLDs should support this, however for the near future having a DNS server with a v6 only address would have too many limitations.


2

What you're asking is largely opinion based, which isn't a good way to approach the problem. What you should be more concerned with are what the standards have to say. Considering the fact that nothing has emerged to obsolete BCP91, I think you would be best served by reading the document in full. Section 1 explains the problem in detail, but to avoid ...


2

Which (if any) public TLDs permit for such subdomain configuration? They all should. However some registrars may prevent it due to restrictions in their web UIs. You should consider this a bug and complain. It would be useful if you reported any registrars you find doing this. How many DNS requests, pertaining to the domain, will be served by ...


2

The easiest way to understand the difference between the two is via an example showing the hierarchical nature of the prefixes. An example hierarchy An ISP has been allocated a prefix from a RIR which in this example we will assume is 2001:db8::/32. This prefix is different from the ones handed down to the customers in the sense that the ISP will have to ...


1

On linux it is ping6 -s <packet_size> your.destination.com.



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