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2

So after waiting two weeks for an answer and researching another few hours after opening up a bounty i found the solution. Set up a new IPv6 enabled network and assign a subnet available to me (a /80 of my /64) docker network create --ipv6 --subnet=w:x:y:z:aaaa::/80 myfancynetwork Now start a container and connect it to the new network. Find out it's IP ...


2

You assign a full address (/128) in a quad-A record. The /64 is a range of addresses for you to allocate from. For example: 2604:4301:a:103/64 is my range, and I can use any address between 2604:4301:a:103:: (the :: is shorthand for all-zeros) and 2604:4301:a:103:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF.


1

How do you propose that you would assign a subnet to an AAAA record? :) Per the RFC: The AAAA resource record type is a record specific to the Internet class that stores a single IPv6 address.


8

Giving each website its own address makes it easier to see which website traffic is for on the network. This can help with accounting, attack detection and prevention and things like that. It may also make it easier to move a website to a different server because you can just move the address with it. If you're not doing things like that's the benefits are ...


5

It's not that a link-local address is required to be generated from the MAC address; it never has been a requirement. You can manually assign link-local addresses on many devices. What you are seeing with Windows is the use of Privacy Extensions and random addressing. Instead of the original way of assigning a SLAAC Interface ID, Privacy Extensions and ...


0

ssh's -6 parameter forces the client to connect with IPv6: ssh -6 hostname It is possible to stop sshd from listening on IPv6 but that would simply cause an error instead of your slow connection problem. The exact reason why your connection alternates randomly between the two may be hard (and pointless) to pinpoint, but is probably related to the results (...


3

Firstly, you need to use ping6. Secondly, you need to specify an interface with -I; as the man page says: -I interface [...] For ping6, when doing ping to a link-local scope address, link specification (by the '%'-notation in destination, or by this option) is required. Et voila: [me@risby scratch]$ ping6 -I p1p1 fe80::213:72ff:feba:3750 [...] ...


2

This first bit is not a direct answer to your question. I just include it here for others that don't realise the importance of ICMPv6. IPv6 really needs certain ICMP message types to get through. The most important ones are Packet-Too-Big and Parameter-Problem. If you block those then you will get connectivity issues. Also: the IPv6 equivalent of ARP is ...


2

Before answering the questions, I'd like to address some of the assumptions in it. The firewalling properties of NAT were also beneficial for security. This is often-repeated, but simply not true; see below. IPv4 NAT firewall rules are "block incoming packet remote-address:port -> local-address:port, unless sent outgoing packet local-address:port ->...


0

Your external access on IPv6 may be restricted to a single IP address. Normally you would be provided with one or more /64 subnets for internal use. These would be advertised by one or more radvd servers on your local network. You will need to check with your IP provider to see what mechanism to use, and which subnets are assigned to you. IPv6 clients ...


1

You will need to delegate individual /48s. Assuming your /32 is 2001:DB8::/32 your zone is 8.b.d.0.1.0.0.2.ip6.arpa. Reverse zones are done by dotted nibbles. That is why recommended sub-delegations are a /56 or a /48. This yields 256, and 65356 /64 subnets respectively. If you assign 6 zones starting with 2001:DB8:1234/48, you would need to delegate ...


0

From your question it seems that you are connected, I guess over ethernet, to a /64 network from your VPS provider. In that case what you ask is not possible. Your upstream router would have to keep a Neighbor Discovery entry for each separate IPv6 address in memory, which will use much more memory than available (1). You can ask your provider to route a ...


1

Is it possible for me to use IPV6 in my local network/subnet? Yes, infact your local network's router most likely already does handle internal ipv6 routing. is it even worth it to do so? Subjective ... it all depends on what you are trying to accomplish. If you are just planning on using it for home use aka hooking up the occasional laptop / cell ...


2

Sure, it's possible here is list of tunnel broker provider : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_IPv6_tunnel_brokers If your ISP does not route IPv6 packet to you. There are many solutions that can help you to serve IPv6 and access IPv6 network. In my case I have a public IPv4 address which make me able to use 6in4 served by Hurricane Electric. 6in4 ...


2

If all 17 addresses are assigned and configured, any of them (or all of them) will work. The key is that the address is working on the server


1

You have to use address which is configured on your server interface. No another limit, it behaves same as IPv4.


3

You use whichever IP v6 address you have assigned to your server.


3

Teredo is a protocol that tunnels IPv6 traffic via UDP on IPv4 to a Teredo server, which then routes the IPv6 traffic onward to the Internet, or back toward you. The Teredo IPv6 address you receive encodes the IPv4 address of the Teredo server and UDP port for your particular tunnel connection. If the tunnel disconnects and reconnects, these may change. ...


2

Are there any risks or caveats to take into account when adding an IPv4-only DC to an existing pool of DCs that are already configured with IPv4 and IPv6 enabled? - No. Also, don't disable the IPv6 components on the new DC. The fact that EC2 doesn't support IPv6 is irrelevant to the configuration and operation of the actual DC.



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