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Greg's answer is alright, but your question specifically states that you want to check this from the client, not from the domain controller. So I'll take a crack at it. First way, enable Kerberos logging on your client: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa\Kerberos\Parameters LogLevel DWORD 0x1 Once Kerberos logging is enabled, ...


3

One way would be to check the domain controller Security event log for Event Id 4264 (logon) events, where the AuthenticationPackageName is NTLM or Kerberos. You should also verify that your domain controllers have auditing enabled, and are capturing the required auditing events. You can create custom Event Viewer filters to make this easier, and filter ...


1

This command: c:/> ktpass -princ HTTP/vmproxy.mydomain.com@MYDOMAIN.COM -mapuser squid@MYDOMAIN.COM -crypto rc4-hmac-nt -pass P@ssw0rd -ptype KRB5_NT_PRINCIPAL -out krb5.keytab I believe sets HTTP/vmproxy.mydomain.com@MYDOMAIN.COM to be a service principal associated with the squid@MYDOMAIN.COM user in AD. Active Directory does not typically allow you ...


1

Kerberos credentials expire after a set amount of time. This is set up by the site admins, typical is about 24hrs. Your real problem is that your home directory is likely in AFS which is a distributed filesystem that uses kerberos for authentication. What you need to do to regain file access is to aquire a new kerberos ticket and AFS token. ( tokens are ...



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