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The grub.cfg.tar file on the boot partition is actually built into the grub image, so modifying it does not make a difference. You can add a grub.cfg file on the OEM partition (/dev/sda6) that will be read during boot. For this instance, the following should work: mount /dev/sda6 /boot echo set linux_append="net.ifnames=0 " > /boot/grub.cfg reboot


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The initramfs executes /scripts/local-top/mdadm to handle raid. In that script is the statement if $MDADM --assemble --scan --run --auto=yes${extra_args:+ $extra_args}; then verbose && log_success_msg "assembled all arrays." else log_failure_msg "failed to assemble all arrays." fi With the version of mdadm shipping with Debian Jessie, ...


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It works fine for me: mv /boot/grub/grub.conf /boot/grub/bk_grub.conf yum -y update && yum -y reinstall kernel


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I noticed in the list of tweaks that timestamps is turned off, please do not do that. That is an old throwback to days of yore when bandwidth was really expensive and people wanted to save a few bytes/packet. It is used, for example, by the TCP stack these days to tell if a packet arriving for a socket in "CLOSE_WAIT" is an old packet for the connection or ...


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In general, every machine that acts as a TCP server, especially with short-lived connections (e.g. serving a web site), would benefit. And the higher the connection latency, the higher the benefit as IW10 would reduce the amount of round-trips initially. IW10 would also help faster recovery in case of packet losses in comparison to IW3. The Load Balancer ...


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Thanks to caskey for pointing me in the right direction. In case someone else needs the same functionality, here is the function that converts a path to a device: #include <libudev.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <locale.h> #include <unistd.h> #include <string.h> #include <sys/stat.h> #include ...


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Shift+O to modify the Boot instructions, then clear runweasel field and enter this value and push ENTER ignoreHeadless=TRUE


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fstat() on the file returns a struct stat which contains a field of type dev_t. There are macros which will extract the major and minor device numbers. Those uniquely identify a drive and partition on a system.


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There is something wrong with your hardware - this can be the hard drive itself, the motherboard, or maybe the cable connection is noisy. Use badblocks to check the drive. But I suggest to back-up all the data beforehand, as comprehensive tests can kill a dying drive.


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Actually, I just re-read this Oracle Blog post: https://blogs.oracle.com/wim/entry/fast_reboots_for_oracle_linux So, as long as you use the UEK kernel, you can do the kexec fast reboot on OEL5 and OEL6. This is not related to ksplice (which is about not rebooting in the first place!) and not needed a license or anything to use.



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