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22

Assuming that you are in an Active Directory domain environment with at least 25 computers on-site (or on your reliable, mission-critical WAN or VPN) running any combination of Server 2008, Server 2008 R2, Windows Vista, and Windows 7, you will want to use KMS. Detailed pros/cons: MAK: Pro: When you activate a product with a MAK key, it is activated ...


5

As it turns out, the version of the KMS software included with Server 2008 is version 1.1. In order to use Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2 KMS keys, you need to be running KMS 1.2. KMS 1.2 is included as part of Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2, but requires a separate download to run on Server 2008 (non-R2) or Server 2003. I found the answer and more info on ...


5

Well, lets jsut say ignoring documentation is never wise, and you did so. Your images should be sysprepped and thus geneate unique identities. as they obvfiously are not - you are in trouble.


4

Self-answer: I needed to download http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=97b7b710-6831-4ce5-9ff5-fdc21fe8d965&displayLang=en - the Office 2010 KMS Host License Pack. This modifies KMS to also activate Office, as the stock KMS is not able to ;)


4

KMS is by design stateless. The documents stated pretty clearly that there is no reporting capabilities, which means you're on your own for making one. You're already doing everything you can. The next step is to make a long term archive of event-logs so you can get longer timescales beyond what the server running KMS keeps.


4

The Volume Activation Management Tool v3.1 has been released and it now includes several reports including how many clients of each type (MAK, KMS) have been activated. You can read an overview of the tool on TechNet at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh824953.aspx


4

For Windows KMS the newer key will activate down-level clients. See section 1.2 Plan for Key Management Services activation for a nice table. The product key group "Volume license for Windows Server 2012 R2" can activate the following versions: Windows Server 2012 R2 (all editions) Windows 8.1 Enterprise Windows 8.1 Pro Windows Server 2012 (all editions) ...


3

http://blogs.technet.com/b/odsupport/archive/2013/10/17/unable-to-kms-activate-office-running-on-windows-8-1-or-windows-server-2012-r2.aspx Installing the Hotfix from KB2885698 worked for me. Do give it a try.


3

It's not a big deal. Licensing is such a tiny application, and the attack surface is a single port on a service I've never seen a vulnerability for (though you may want to double-check on that). If you can, go ahead and make sure it's 2008 R2 so that Office 2010 KMS/volume licensing is supported.


3

First of all, it is necessary to install KB2757817 in order to activate a Server 2012 KMS key on Windows Server 2008 R2. Second, you need to clarify whether you actually have a Server 2012 KMS key. You will not be able to install a Windows 8 KMS key on a server, period. However, server KMS keys typically can activate client operating systems. For example: ...


3

You say the CMIDs should be fine, but you haven't actually verified them. You need to find out whether all of the machines really do have unique CMIDs or not. The KB article tells you to run slmgr.vbs -dli on the clients. And you say the output wasn't displaying the CMID. Did you actually run the command on the client workstations? Or did you ...


2

Honestly, KMS is the most convenient way to license large number of computer, but the buck stops right there. You can pull statistics from it using cscript slmgr.vbs /dli; but the licensed count will never exceed twice the minimum to activate a particular license (ie Win 7 takes 25 to activate, so the count will never go over 50). It doesn't keep track of ...


2

Computers activated with a KMS must check-in with the KMS once ever 180 days. If the computer isn't going to be able to communicate with the KMS (if it's, say, an off-site employee w/ no access to the LAN) then a KMS activation probably isn't the way to go. After a MAK activation, no further communication with Microsoft is required. This makes it work well ...


2

The CMID of the workstation needs to be unique. As TomTom pointed out, sysprep is the way to go and is a requirement regardless of your imaging process, otherwise the operating system is unsupported by Microsoft. Sysprep does way more than just change your sid or cmid. Scott McArthur who is a Senior Support Escalation Engineer at Microsoft wrote a blog that ...


2

Well according to Microsoft this is completely normal and the machines will end up in "Licensed" when the Grace period of 30 days is up. Got to say I'm a little suspicious about that, but I have to take their word for it. I'll update this post again in a few weeks if that does not turn out to be the case. UPDATE: I can now confirm that the machines have ...


2

Looking at your screen shot shows the line "Windows Server(R), VOLUME_KMSCLIENT channel" which seems to indicate your 2008 R2 KMS host was activated using a KMS client or MAK key. This means you cannot use this host to activate windows 7 clients. Find your 2008 R2 KMS key from the microsoft licensing site and remove the current key and use the 2008 R2 KMS ...


2

I would check for : -if there is a connection over to KMS server (1688 TCP ) -if the computer sees the network as a domain . -if you have a logged atempt to activate that 2013 Office . If that doesn't help I would take a look at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee939272.aspx - KMS troubleshooting .


2

When the grace period expires, Windows typically will reboot every hour until activated. The grace period it would seem is 30 days (which can be re-armed). See below. There is an article here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh831612.aspx but it doesn't explicitly say what will happen, just says "The computers running Windows Server 2012 must ...


2

My understanding is that you're way off. KMS keys are not 'linked' to a MAK key; they do not have an 'activation total'. Any KMS server key will activate any number of clients, given the normal minimum requirements are met to trigger KMS to start activating client requests. All you should need to do is switch your clients from MAK keys to the default KMS ...


2

If my Google-fu is correct, it unfortunately looks like you can't do this. Paraphrasing the TechNet post: You can't install the Windows 8 KMS host Product Key for Windows on Windows Server 2008 R2. You can only install the Windows 8 KMS host Product Key on a Windows client operating system (i.e., Windows 7 or Windows 8). If your KMS host is a ...


2

My wish is for 1 server to handle all the KMS licenses, is it possible? Yes, but remember to backup/plan for replacing it. KMS is a separate download (e.g. here for Server 2008). The download pages contain technet links (and technet search gives a lot of links as well).


1

You can use KMS on a Server 2008 (non-R2) server to license up-level versions, you just need to update the KMS server. (And also update your OS from SP1 to SP2.) Here is the update: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2757817/en-us This update extends the Key Management Service (KMS) for Windows Vista, for Windows Server 2008, for Windows 7, and for ...


1

I doubt anyone will be able to say for certain in 100% of the cases that a CNAME would work. But were I in your shoes, I'd validate it works for the subset of systems I can test and then just go for it. Worst case, you monitor your client counts before and after so you notice if they start going down as if clients are connecting anymore. Both Windows and ...


1

Your key for 2012 will not work on 2012 R2. Log into your volume license portal and get a key for 2012 R2.


1

It seems to me that you could probably use the Manually Create SRV Records in DNS method in this article in conjunction with Conditional Forwarders to achieve this. https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff793405.aspx?f=255&MSPPError=-2147217396


1

Some places use MAK keys if the client computer may not be connected to activate using KMS (typically notebooks). The KMS client keys are published on the Microsoft web site. If you run cscript slmgr.vbs /dlv, and it displays VOLUME_MAK or does not display VOLUME_KMSCLIENT, you aren't using KMS. KMS and MAK client setup keys are mutually exclusive. ...


1

This is more of an FYI, i am still unsure what the best practice is for this one, but here is what i did. I demoted the old KMS host, then removed the DNS entry for it. Then promoted the new host and manually created the DNS entry for it. All working as it should be now.


1

It turns out that in a case like mine where you have a retail edition of Windows but a volume license edition of Office you must have Windows fully activated before a KMS host will talk to your machine for purposes of activating Office. I did not have my installation of Windows 7 Ultimate activated during my attempts to activate Office against the KMS host. ...


1

I've done exactly this. As Hyppy said, it's a very low impact application as all it is doing is passing data through. Do be careful of KMS versions, though as there is some variation. I ended up running one on 2003 and another on 2008R2 because of what they each were able to license.


1

The KMs service activates anybody that asks for activation from vista on up. In order for your server to activate computers, you must have at least 5 Servers checked in for server activation to occur or 25 Windows 7 or Vista machines checked in for client activation to occur.



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