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17

You will have to ask your university support. Whoever administers the licenses will have to log into the Microsoft eOpen site. It's listed there.


10

I'm sure you're all aware of it, but just for the record the per-CPU pricing for SQL Server is per socket - not per core.


8

There are a few licensing options. If the application is internal only you can license the SQL Server with a server license which is a few thousand, then buy a CAL one for each employee which needs access to the system. If the application is internal only you can license the SQL Server with a server license which is a few thousand, then buy a CAL one for ...


7

Sadly, I'm sure it depends both on your local laws and the EULA for each individual product. ArsTechnica has an article up about legal precedent specifically in relation to reselling AutoCAD licenses. In short, the courts have found that it is illegal for them to prevent you from reselling the license. In the US, anyway.


6

Yes, you do, a license is required regardless of whether you run on bare metal or in a VM.


5

I guess there is no general answer for your question. It depends on what's written in the software license agreement (or EULA). The best thing you can do here is to ask the vendor of the product.


5

This type of question is one reason why we never buy OEM server licenses. I want to be able to move licenses around if necessary. The usual rule for OEM licenses is that if you change the motherboard, it's a different computer and you can't use the license. Here's one article about what hardware changes in XP can require a new OEM license. If it were me, ...


4

Use the same license key for the Standard Edition VMs.


4

The licensing docs explicitly mentions multiplexing does not reduce the CAL requirement for end users. Use of hardware and/or software that reduces the number of devices or users that directly access or use the software (multiplexing/pooling) does not reduce the number of CALs required. n users = n CALs. If you don't know n then you have to go "per ...


4

The answer to this question suggests that automatically pulling the license info out of a single .deb package is non-trivial. I suspect there is no easy way to do what you want. Since the answer I linked to has been updated, I'll update mine too. This is beginning to change, as the debian/copyright file is now required to be machine-interpretable, so ...


3

You will need to obatin a volume license so that the product does not need to activate. Then it's just a paper exercise of how many users and buy the appropriate number of licenses.


3

Microsoft Licensing is only going to give that code to someone who's got the Agreement number and License number (not license key). Which brings us back to Joseph's answer - you're only going to be able to get it through University IT. However, if you put in a helpdesk ticket that makes it as easy as humanly possible, it should improve your odds. The US ...


3

Download and install the 180 day trial, then once you get the keys later you can do an in-place "upgrade". If someone lost the key, you might try looking at the registry key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Microsoft SQL Server\XX\Registration->CD_KEY. I haven't verified the above on a full copy of SQL Server, but found that mentioned a few places on ...


3

Here's the link to the Microsoft page that discusses SQL Server licensing and all the options - it also has a link to a doc that explains the various options and the gray areas. This is the official word: SQL Server 2008 Pricing or SQL Server 2005 Pricing. Depending on your company size and agreements with MS, you may be able to negotiate lower volume ...


3

The MSDN website has a detailed description of all the Operating System requirements for the various editions of SQL Server 2008 from the Express right through the Data Center editions. The requirements for the OS change as you move through the versions. Express will run on consumer operating systems, but it appears that most of the versions of Windows ...


3

Unless it's Windows Server. I believe Standard Edition allows one virtualized guest included. Enterprise Edition allows for four also.


3

The question was essentially: without upgrading, what techniques can one employ to conserve host usage. @dunxd was the closest so he gets the nod, although the expense of sticking a router between the ASA and servers is greater than the upgrade (setup in a colo facility, pay $$ per U per month) For future ASA newbies, the 10 host limit applies to any ...


3

The SA accout in SQL server is the traditional "System Administrator" and goes back to the time that was a Sybase product. It has zero relationship with Software Assurance or any licensing. It is just a standard account that is created so that one CAN (it can be disabled at install time or later) log in as a local machine administrator FOR THE DATABASE ...


2

I recommend you ask your University technical support, software licensing department, or the University bookstore (if that's how you're buying it). Our university switched from Open to Select several years ago. At least back in those days, we found the "Open" media did not work with "Select" keys and vice versa. So when you say "I can find Office 2003 ...


2

According to the "Licenses: Migrating, Upgrading, and Renaming" documentation on the Citrix website, it looks like you could do manual deletions of the .lic files, but it's not recommended because if the metadata isn't updated properly it would screw up Citrix's license counts (see page 11 of linked PDF). The "Access Essentials Administrator's Guide" only ...


2

At that price, go talk to your local microsoft office and do a deal.


2

Corelgott, as you have probably already figured out none of us here are Microsoft licensing experts and even if a few of us are, nothing that we say would satisfy your legal department since they would not be officially representing Microsoft. (And if you say "But I don't have a legal department so there's no worries!" just remember that you will still have ...


2

I added "management" because for us it's partly a management issue. We don't usually have the time to sell surplus equipment, and we've never taken the time to sell surplus licences. At least with old hardware, it's sitting unused in a corner anyway, it's already been removed from inventory, and we can just post something on Craigslist or sell it ...


2

You need an OEM media, that's actually a different media from retail and VLK, so you can't use OEM keys on those other ones. You can try "looking around" for it, IYKWIM; as long as you have a proper license key, it doesn't actually matter where did you get the media.


2

Did you create and install these VM's individually or did you clone them? The problem could be that the SID is the same. I'm not entirely certain if that COULD cause this exact issue but it can cause other similar issues with things like windows updates. If you cloned them run NewSid on the machines to give each of them their own unique SIDs.


2

The following KB articles cover troubleshooting the errors you mention: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/950755 http://support.microsoft.com/kb/938450 http://support.microsoft.com/kb/942969 The first KB article recommends re-entering the key to resolve your first error, and for the second two (which have the same error), your best bet will be to call the ...


2

0 CAl. Maybe 1. Depends how your application accesses the data. Because the clients never access the database at all - this is pretty much a regular export job. Once exported - the CAL does not count anymore. The trick here is that the export is not triggered by the user. This is similar than exporting a catalog into HTML via a tool and then having the web ...


2

Windows has a built-in failsafe for this. It's called either the console session, or the admin session, depending on your version of windows, but the effect is the same. If your RDP client is on Windows XP, run mstsc /console, or if it's Vista or Windows 7, run mstsc /admin - this will always get you in to your server, but will disconnect anyone else who is ...


2

It isn't nice but putting a NAT router in between the ASA and your internal network will limit the number of hosts the ASA counts, since it will only count the NAT router, and nothing behind it as a host. The upgrade to a higher number isn't that expensive in my experience - probably worth paying that than dealing with the hassle of NATing your internal ...



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