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40

Unplug the ethernet cable and see who gets upset. Seriously though, mystery machines like this create a lot of mental overheard for a team and often provide absolutely no business value. Talk to your boss, if no one knows what it does maybe no one cares what it does.


29

This is a pretty broad question for the Serverfault format, but here is a good start: Check for running processes and those scheduled to run at system startup. Review the running configuration of each. Look into any defined data directories. (Maybe someone installed MySQL and turned it on, but there are no databases.) Check for scheduled tasks. Check the ...


19

There are a few things you could do to try and ascertain what's running on your system. You can check which ports your server is listening on to get an idea of what's on there. A good command to use would be: [root@server ~]# netstat -tulpn Active Internet connections (only servers) Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address Foreign Address ...


17

Another method involves checking the /etc directory and looking at the modification dates. After a fresh install all the files in this directory should have roughly the same date/time. And since an install usually installs a lot of things people usually do not use, only the files that have a later modification date reflect the actual purpose of the server. ...


7

Check the firewall rules. With a bit of luck, it's configured for default-deny. That means there's an explicit rule for each allowed service. This is better then netstat because it can also show ports that are open for e.g for nightly backups.


5

One answer I've not seen yet: Check the most recently modified files. Logs, database files, other output files etc. may get written to still that may provide clues: find . -mtime -3 That would find modified files in the current directory and deeper, changed in the last 3 days. Increase the number 3 to an educated guess until you get some output you can ...


5

The subnet mask is mostly used to work out whether another IP address can be accessed on the local network, or if it needs to go through a router. Your workstations with the old /24 subnet mask will have been able to access everything else that was inside the old /24 network, because the wrong mask will still give the right answer for those addresses. They ...


2

Actually, when you do: $ ssh -f -N -D 0.0.0.0:8080 root@192.168.3.182 $ curl --socks5 192.168.3.182:8080 ip.appspot.com The following events occur: CURL opens a TCP connection from [YOUR-HOST]:[RANDOM-PORT] to the SOCKS server that SSHD runs on 192.168.3.182:8080 SSHD accepts the connection CURL asks SSHD to open a new connection from ...


2

According to nixCraft: Genmask : The netmask for the destination net; 255.255.255.255 for a host destination and 0.0.0.0 for the default route. It's called 'genmask' because it shows the 'generality' (i.e. the netmask) of the route.


1

This answer assumes that your router has an ip address of 192.169.1.100 (or any ip address between 192.168.1.0-255). With a /24 subnet mask your ip address range is 192.168.1.0-192.168.1.255 (including the network and broadcast addresses). With a /20 subnet mask your ip address range is 192.168.0.0-192.168.15.255 (including the network and broadcast ...


1

DNS congestion is pretty damn unlikely. Not only has it been around since the days of dial-up (read: serial port speeds), the /etc/resolv.conf defaults use a five second timeout cycle by default. There are a few knobs you can play with, but this is unlikely to be a real problem. Tune timeout and similar options in /etc/resolv.conf. (see man resolv.conf) ...



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