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5

When the socket is in TIME_WAIT, there is no process attached to it anymore and the kernel is just holding it in case some other packet arrives. At this point, the software the originally opened this socket does not have a open file description to it anymore. That's why you can't find any relation to it. The socket that existed in /proc/$PID/fd is not there ...


4

No, there is no such logfile. You have to specifically set up logging to do that, and I am not aware of a standard way to do it. It may not be easy to do it accurately: a user may cause a process that isn't owned by that user to generate network traffic and it may not be trivial to ascribe that traffic to that user. See e.g. this near-duplicate question or ...


3

The iLO RAC is a completely separate NIC. If you want the OS to have a network connection you must also connect the on-board NIC to the network. I'm guessing you don't have the NIC plugged in, and Ubuntu has no magical powers to make a network connection out of an unplugged NIC.


2

A socket in TIME_WAIT status is no longer owned by a process, but by the kernel. As such, there is no owner, that's why you can't see it :)


2

To drop all traffic but allow two specific IP addresses, you will need to use three rules in this order (iptables rules are processed in order, so the order matters): Allow IP 1 Allow IP 2 Drop all If multiple IPs are on the same subnet, you can use either CIDR or IP/mask notation. You can also do something more fancy like create a chain, see this ...


2

Reverse the logic (accept if.. instead of drop if not..) in your iptables rules and use two rules: iptables -A INPUT -s FIRST_IP_HERE -p tcp --dport 30001 -j ACCEPT iptables -A INPUT -s SECOND_IP_HERE -p tcp --dport 30001 -j ACCEPT iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 30001 -j DROP


2

A great way of doing this is with 802.1x and port-based authentication, combined with a captive portal. You set up a captive portal on your gateway to make the user accept terms/conditions or enter a guest password. You assign that captive portal onto your guest VLAN. Then you use 802.1x on all your switch ports. If the MAC address authentication passes, ...


2

It is very simple: with iptables, you can track the users as well. Theoretically, you could block/delete/redirect their packets, but now currently you only want to measure them. It is very simple, because iptables by default tracks all of the data getting through their rules. An example code is here: iptables -A OUTPUT -o eth0 -m owner --uid-owner 1001 ...


2

I believe you created an orphan socket by killing the connection on the .137 server. So, the kernel parameter in use would be tcp_orphan_retries - which has a generic linux default of 7. You can get a description of both the condition you created and the results here: http://www.linuxinsight.com/proc_sys_net_ipv4_tcp_orphan_retries.html


2

Use the REDIRECT target in the nat table, in the PREROUTING chain. Assuming the server uses TCP, run this command as root: iptables -t nat -I PREROUTING -p tcp -m tcp --dport 443 \ -j REDIRECT --to-ports 25565 If the server uses UDP, replace tcp with udp.


2

The order of reboots is important. Rebooting the server after the clients can result in this situation. The stale NFS handle indicates that the client has a file open, but the server no longer recognizes the file handle. In some cases, NFS will cleanuo its data structures after a timeout. In other cases, you will need to clean the NFS data structures ...


2

You have and extra dot on one of the ranges: export no_proxy="localhost,127.0.0.0/8,172.16.0.0/12,192.168.0.0/16" EDIT: After searching, it seems no_proxy won't work with networks, only domains .sample.com or exact IP 192.168.1.2, so either you add your local domain, all the IP your network has, or you use flags like wget --no-proxy


2

Your benchmark is not testing the network performance of either operating system. Linux implements the loopback device as a pure software layer, with no connection to actual networking devices. On Windows, there isn't even a loopback device linked to the 127.0.0.1 address. All your tests could be measuring is the performance of CPU scheduling and memory ...


1

The problem is that you need to establish a link between a network connection and a user while it is running. Once this has been done, this link is lost (at least, up to my knowledge). One way to keep this information could be follow what is explained in this question: How to monitor network bandwidth per user on Ubuntu server?. (askUbuntu)


1

Well, which DHCP Client do you use? There are some different around. Considerung you are using the standard one from the ISC, you need to put a like like this in your dhclient.conf: reject 10.0.0.5; Where you replace the IP of course with the IP of the server whose offers you don't want. That's it. For futher information take a look at the man page of ...


1

In order for tcp wrappers to have effect, you need to launch the corresponding service out of xinetd or have the application link to libwrap. The xinetd daemon is a TCP-wrapped super service. tcpwrappers compatibility The first thing to remember is that not every network-based application on your machine is compatible with tcpwrappers. The restrictions ...


1

By default nmap probes only the 1000 most often used ports. If you want to scan a specific port, use nmap like this: nmap ... -p2012 ...


1

Old question, I know. But to answer anyway: you cannot have two default gateways. That's where the RTNETLINK answers: File exists error comes from when issuing ifdown and ifup. Remove the gateway 10.10.20.1 line from either eth0 or eth1. And more general: /etc/init.d/networking restart or service networking restart were never really supported and are not ...


1

I had the same symptoms and the problem turned out to be this kernel bug: https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=754294



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