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This is a very interesting topic, as a few years back i had a similar issue with a large corporation that has data centers across the world, most of its data was company oriented and was on private networks. But to the topic at hand, most large networks that require both, network engineers and network administrators. Network engineers and network ...


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You can login on the Linux server and use tcpdump in order to capture all traffic from/to relevant server. You can then use your captured dump in Wireshark for further analysis. tcpdump -i <youInterface> -w dump.cap Where: -i : Interface to capture traffic from. -w : Write captured traffic to file On "yourInterface" you might want to add your ...


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For such a small network and without the assumption that there is dns server on this network you can simply add the ip addresses to the local hosts file on each machine. I know this is a bit "old school" but it will be 100% solid and never fail. The reason dns may failing is that your dhcp server may be providing dns settings for a dns server that either ...


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There's no automatic system for making your hostname known to the rest of the network. If you have a DHCP server (often on your router in home setups) that might know it (I can see that mine does, but I don't know the DHCP protocol well enough to know how it's done). If you want others to know what IP address a certain name corresponds to, you (typically) ...


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Linux: dig +short myip.opendns.com @resolver1.opendns.com Windows: nslookup myip.opendns.com resolver1.opendns.com


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Yes, upgrade to a gigabit switch. To be honest I'm surprised that you are getting the throughput that you are. Fast Ethernet is 100mbps, that's 100 million bits per second. In reality there is always other network traffic and handshaking, so I'd never expect to get the full 100mbps. So to me your figures are surprisingly good: 92.5mbps and 88.7mbps write ...


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If your firewall allows the local network to access your webserver port (80 most of the time) then they can access by IP address indeed. And if you want them to be able to access it via a domain name, you can have them use their hosts file to make a DNS record matching this domain name to your IP address. Depending on the networking setup, you may be ...


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If people connect to your IP on a web browser, they will be able to see it.


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I know you say that DNS is set up and running properly, but the symptoms you report all suggest DNS. I was going to suggest you ping your DNS server, but you said in a comment above that you did. Nevertheless, something is clearly not right. Hexaduple-check (sorry!) the settings on your SQL Server, with ipconfig /all. Try to run nslookup on the ...


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Sounds like you have an internal IP address but no DNS setup on the server. Can you ping Google's DNS server 8.8.8.8 (assuming ICMP is allowed on your firewall) and get a response? If so, all you need to do is make sure you have your own DNS configured and then run nslookup and see what get's returned.



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