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0

Try to add to your zone (group.hom.db) this: group.hom. IN A 192.168.0.1 Because you only have an entry for www.group.hom


0

Why don't you put your wired users and wireless users on different subnets? That way you can tag your traffic by network mask.


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Your Dallas default gateway device needs a static route directing the Ft. Worth SSL VPN subnet via the Ft. Worth VPN endpoint.


-1

Ok, so basically we've seen a lot of stuff so far, and I can be pretty sure to say that this issue is related to the Windows Samsung Driver. Somehow, after installing it, it possibly corrupts a shared library with the Dell drivers, causing both printers to fail at printing sometimes. Why am I sure? All the Windows computers with Dell's and Samsung's ...


6

You have a lot of options here. One of the assumptions baked into IPv6 is that everything is probably going to have several IP addresses. At the outset you have the link-local addresses (the fe80:: addresses), as well as whatever address you're assigned. That's two. The documentation makes clear that cases where an interface will have a link-local, a ...


0

As the other answers on this page describe, there are ways to achieve similar functionality, but: No, there is no "per-user" file like /etc/hosts or any other way to override the default name resolution as a non-privileged user in GNU/Linux.


0

Your post is a bit difficult to understand. First, you need to specify the services you are attempting to connect! If your COMP2->WAN:A is over a NAT'd network, and that service is something like Windows Remote Desktop, then you have to specify in your firewall settings that you will allow certain interactions such as NAT Traversal in your windows firewall ...


1

A network design could look like this. Each building switch double attached (using fiber uplinks) to a failover backbone router at the Center Building. Default backbone route would be a Firewall.


1

You might consider using routers instead of switches. If the campus is a big one, and there are a lot (lets say 1000+) clients, it does make sense to go for a routed network instead of a big and bloated tree structure. Also, if you do not have enough experience, a Cisco Catalyst will be overkill for you.


1

You have a routing problem. Consider this: your RPI (192.168.0.x) does know nothing about the existence of another LAN (192.168.1.x). How can you inform it that another LAN exists right next to it? Answer: by using a route, which is a very specific piece of information stating how a particular subnet/host can be reached. In your example, your LAN ...


0

The ASA line can throttle to specific bandwidths, yes. You could assign a policy to each vLAN limiting them to 33Mb. An IOS router might be preferable as it can do Custom Queuing on Interfaces; which could allow any one of the three to saturate the 100Mb when the others aren't using it (call it a 33Mb connection that can "burst" to 100Mb).



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