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0

Google for logstash and if you don't mind spending money then give Loggy a try.


1

I had success with adding this to the "Additional parameters for <VirtualHost>" CustomLog "/Applications/MAMP/logs/mySiteName_access.log" combined


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The best practice here is to write a script and call that script by full path within cron. This really is just reinforcing what Gene stated, but writing a script that will run those commands allows you the ability to test the script before placing it in a cron. Additionally, this makes cron easier to read over the long run.


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Firstly, when configuring a crontab use the full path for any commands and scripts you are calling. For example: tee should be /usr/bin/tee mailx should be /bin/mailx date should be /bin/date Note: If the paths are different on your system change as appropriate Also, chaining commands in a crontab (i.e. piping, |) can get messy very quickly. It might ...


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Cron doesn't allow % characters.


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Your second try[Edit 2] is having the correct syntax but I think the error occurs as you are using an older version of NGINX. The 'if' in access log was introduced in NGINX 1.7, see the release notes. If you have installed NGINX from Ubuntu repo then they are shipping ver 1.4.x . Run nginx with -V to know which version you are running. $ nginx -V ...


1

According to nginx documentation found here and here, try to use map rule to map your http referer to certain value and then log to specific file according that value. Put this map in your http context (outside the server context): map $http_referer $log_referer { example.com 1; default 0; } This goes to your server, location, etc.; access_log ...


2

The message indicates that the machine running out of file handles, check the current value and try increasing the value. List the current max-limit #cat /proc/sys/fs/file-max To increase the number of files (for whole system), add the following line to your sysctl.conf (/etc/sysctl.conf) fs.file-max = 131072 Run below command to re-read the ...


0

Try running logrotate manually to look for errors: logrotate -d /etc/logrotate.d/httpd. The manual says "-d Turns on debug mode and implies -v. In debug mode, no changes will be made to the logs or to the logrotate state file." This is what we're using successfully: /var/log/httpd/*log { daily dateext dateformate -%d-%m-%Y missingok nocompress ...


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Following on to Brian's answer, I'm a big fan of cronolog, which does pretty much exactly what you're going for: CustomLog "|/usr/sbin/cronolog /var/log/httpd/%Y/%m/%Y-%m-%d-access.log" combined ErrorLog "|/usr/sbin/cronolog /var/log/httpd/%Y/%m/%Y-%m-%d-error.log" yum install cronolog will get you cronolog on Cent6.


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Apache lets you pipe log files to another program which can then handle rotation without having to reload/restart Apache. Apache even provides a program to do this. ErrorLog "|bin/rotatelogs -l -f /var/log/apache2/errlogfile.%Y.%m.%d.log 86400" common CustomLog "|bin/rotatelogs -l -f /var/log/apache2/logfile.%Y.%m.%d.log 86400" common


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The last screenshot that you have is that of an item being "not supported", rather than a trigger. If you hover over the red cross on the right side, you should see the reason why the item is not supported. According to https://www.zabbix.com/documentation/2.4/manual/config/items/itemtypes/zabbix_agent, the log[] item must be configured as an active check, ...


2

There were probably some control characters that file (which appears to be binary, not text. Maybe it is a zipped file that you cat'ed by mistake?) which altered the character set of your terminal. Logging out and back in should fix the character issue. As for the file, make sure you did not cat a binary file by mistake. If it ends in .bz or .gz, it is ...


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That log only shows that xinetd received a request on the port that is associated to smtp and sent it to the smtp process. Since you're on centos, if you want to see user login activity you'll have to look at the /var/log/wtmp file using the utmpdump command.


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This line only tell us that you are getting a connection to xinited server "awaking" the smtp server by a connection requested form the given ip. Take a look on the smtp server log on what is the operation the daemon is being requested. The provided information won't give us any clue regarding what you ask, and is likely to be voted down if you don't add ...


4

As your log files have the good taste of having timestamps that are lexicographically sorted, you can simple compare strings using awk, eg: awk 'substr($0,1,17)>="20150720 15:06:00" && substr($0,1,17)<="20150720 16:25:00"' <logfile.log I've assumed here that your timestamp starts at column 1 (numbering from 1). If not, change the ,1, ...



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